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Volume 12; 2015
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Editorials
How much is Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions promoted based on journal metrics?
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:57.   Published online December 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.57
  • 31,298 View
  • 155 Download
  • 11 Citations
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  • Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions will be accepted for inclusion in Scopus
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 2.     CrossRef
  • Journal metrics of Clinical and Molecular Hepatology based on the Web of Science Core Collection
    Sun Huh
    Clinical and Molecular Hepatology.2018; 24(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • How much progress has Blood Research made since the change of the journal title in 2013
    Sun Huh
    Blood Research.2018; 53(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • The great rise ofIntestinal Researchas an international journal 3 years after its language change to English as evidenced by journal metrics
    Geum Hee Jeong, Sun Huh
    Intestinal Research.2017; 15(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The rapid internationalization of Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism as evidenced by journal metrics
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism.2017; 22(2): 77.     CrossRef
  • Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research's promotion to internationally competitive journal evidenced by journal metrics
    Sun Huh
    Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research.2017; 6(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • Promotion ofNeurointerventionto International Journal Based on Journal Metrics
    Sun Huh
    Neurointervention.2016; 11(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Journal of Gastric Cancer's Promotion to International Journal from the Perspective of Biliometric Analysis
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2016; 16(1): 8.     CrossRef
  • Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery's Evolution into an International Journal Based on Journal Metrics
    Sun Huh
    Clinics in Orthopedic Surgery.2016; 8(2): 127.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the suitability of the Korean Federation of Science and Technology Societies journal evaluation tool
    Geum-Hee Jeong, Sun Huh
    Learned Publishing.2016; 29(3): 193.     CrossRef
  • What is interesting in the issue 2016 of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions?
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 46.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Dental students’ and lecturers’ perception of the degree of difficulty of caries detection associated learning topics in Brazil  
Juan Sebastian Lara, Mariana Minatel Braga, Caleb Shitsuka, Chao Lung Wen, Ana Estela Haddad
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:56.   Published online December 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.56
  • 29,794 View
  • 168 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
It aimed to explore the degree of difficulty of caries-detection-associated-topics perceived by dental students and lecturers as pedagogical step in the development of learning objects for e-learning. Methods: A convenience sample comprising ninety-eight subjects from different academic levels (undergraduate/graduate students and pediatric dentistry lecturers) participated. Two spreadsheets (isolated/relative) were created considering key topics in the caries detection process. The isolated evaluation intended to explore each topic in an isolated way, while the relative intended to classify, comparatively, the participants’ perceived difficulty per topic. Afterwards, data were analyzed. All values on spreadsheets were combined obtaining the subject’s final perception. Associations between the subjects’ degree of the perceived difficulty and academic level were estimated. ANOVA was used to determine differences regarding the perception among evaluated topics in distinct groups. Results: Caries histopathology and detection of proximal carious lesions were the topics perceived as the most difficult in the process of caries detection by both students and lecturers. Differentiation between an extrinsic pigmentation and a brown-spot (caries lesion) as well as differential diagnosis between caries and enamel developmental defects or non-carious lesions were considered as more difficult by undergraduates in comparison to graduates/lecturers (regression-coefficient=14.54; Standard Error=3.34; P<0.001 and 8.40, 3.31, and 0.01 respectively). Conclusion: Topics as histopathology and detection of proximal caries lesions were identified as the most difficult despite the academic level. However, some topics are differently perceived according to the group. These results are useful for developing pedagogical material, based on the students real learning needs/expectations.

Citations

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  • Developing diagnostic skills from preclinical dental education: Caries detection and assessment using e‐learning assisted practice
    Alfonso Escobar, Diego F. Rojas‐Gualdrón, Luis F. Velez, Lourdes Santos‐Pinto
    Journal of Dental Education.2022; 86(10): 1382.     CrossRef
  • Dental Students’ Ability to Detect Only-Enamel Proximal Caries on Bitewing Radiographs
    Mohamed Samir A Elnawawy, Harshkant Gharote
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Disruptions in Health Professional Education: Use of Cognitive Load Theory on Students' Comprehension, Cognitive Load, Engagement, and Motivation
    Siti Nurma Hanim Hadie, Vina Phei Sean Tan, Norsuhana Omar, Nik Aloesnisa Nik Mohd Alwi, Hooi Lian Lim, Ku Ishak Ku Marsilla
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Virtual 3D Dynamic Model of Caries Lesion Progression as a Learning Object for Caries Detection Training and Teaching: Video Development Study
    Juan Sebastian Lara, Mariana Minatel Braga, Carlos Gustavo Zagatto, Chao Lung Wen, Fausto Medeiros Mendes, Pedroza Uribe Murisi, Ana Estela Haddad
    JMIR Medical Education.2020; 6(1): e14140.     CrossRef
  • Do undergraduate dental students perform well detecting and staging caries and assessing activity by visual examination? A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Ronairo Z. Turchiello, Djessica Pedrotti, Mariana M. Braga, Rachel O. Rocha, Jonas A. Rodrigues, Tathiane L. Lenzi
    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry.2019; 29(3): 281.     CrossRef
Smartphone-based evaluations of clinical placements—a useful complement to web-based evaluation tools  
Jesper Hessius, Jakob Johansson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:55.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.55
  • 25,694 View
  • 132 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Web-based questionnaires are currently the standard method for course evaluations. The high rate of smartphone adoption in Sweden makes possible a range of new uses, including course evaluation. This study examines the potential advantages and disadvantages of using a smartphone app as a complement to web-based course evaluation systems.
Methods
An iPhone app for course evaluations was developed and interfaced to an existing web-based tool. Evaluations submitted using the app were compared with those submitted using the web between August 2012 and June 2013, at the Faculty of Medicine at Uppsala University, Sweden.
Results
At the time of the study, 49% of the students were judged to own iPhones. Over the course of the study, 3,340 evaluations were submitted, of which 22.8% were submitted using the app. The median of mean scores in the submitted evaluations was 4.50 for the app (with an interquartile range of 3.70-5.20) and 4.60 (3.70-5.20) for the web (P= 0.24). The proportion of evaluations that included a free-text comment was 50.5% for the app and 49.9% for the web (P= 0.80).
Conclusion
An app introduced as a complement to a web-based course evaluation system met with rapid adoption. We found no difference in the frequency of free-text comments or in the evaluation scores. Apps appear to be promising tools for course evaluations. web-based course evaluation system met with rapid adoption. We found no difference in the frequency of free-text comments or in the evaluation scores. Apps appear to be promising tools for course evaluations.

Citations

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  • Enhancing emergency care in low-income countries using mobile technology-based training tools
    Hilary Edgcombe, Chris Paton, Mike English
    Archives of Disease in Childhood.2016; 101(12): 1149.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
Proposal for a Modified Dreyfus and Miller Model with simplified competency level descriptions for performing self-rated surveys  
Janghee Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:54.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.54
  • 34,983 View
  • 294 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In competency-based education, it is important to frequently evaluate the degree of competency achieved by establishing and specifying competency levels. To self-appraise one’s own competency level, one needs a simple, clear, and accurate description for each competency level. This study aimed at developing competency stages that can be used in surveys and conceptualizing clear and precise competency level descriptions. In this paper, the author intends to conceptualize a simple competency level description through a literature review. The author modified the most widely quoted competency level models—Dreyfus’ Five-stage Model and Miller’s Pyramid—and classified competency levels into the following: The Modified Dreyfus Model comprises absolute beginner, beginner, advanced beginner, competent, proficient, and expert, while the Modified Miller Model uses the levels of knows little, knows and knows how, exercised does, selected does, experienced does, and intuitive does. The author also provided a simple and clear description of competency levels. The precise description of competency levels developed in this study is expected to be useful in determining one’s competency level in surveys.

Citations

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  • Assessment of a support garment in parastomal bulging from a patient perspective: a qualitative study
    Trine Borglit, Marianne Krogsgaard, Stine Zeberg Theisen, Mette Juel Rothmann
    International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Milestones 2.0: An advancement in competency-based assessment for dermatology
    Kiran Motaparthi, Laura Edgar, William D. Aughenbaugh, Anna L. Bruckner, Alexa Leone, Erin F. Mathes, Andrea Murina, Ronald P. Rapini, David Rubenstein, Ashley Wysong, Erik J. Stratman
    Clinics in Dermatology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preparation for Challenging Cases: What Differentiates Expert From Novice Surgeons?
    Iman Ghaderi, Lev Korovin, Timothy M. Farrell
    Journal of Surgical Education.2021; 78(2): 450.     CrossRef
  • Rethinking Competence: A Nexus of Educational Models in the Context of Lifelong Learning
    Dalia Bajis, Betty Chaar, Rebekah Moles
    Pharmacy.2020; 8(2): 81.     CrossRef
  • Meeting Personal Health Care Needs in Primary Care: A Response From the Athletic Training Profession
    Wade Green, Eric Sauers
    Athletic Training Education Journal.2020; 15(4): 278.     CrossRef
  • Dreyfus scale-based feedback increased medical students’ satisfaction with the complex cluster part of a interviewing and physical examination course and improved skills readiness in Taiwan
    Shiau-Shian Huang, Chia-Chang Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Shuu-Jiun Wang, Boaz Shulruf, Chen-Huan Chen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 30.     CrossRef
  • Fitness for purpose in anaesthesiology: a review
    Nicola Kalafatis, Thomas Sommerville, Pragasan Dean Gopalan
    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia.2018; 24(6): 148.     CrossRef
  • Confidence in Procedural Skills before and after a Two-Year Master’s Programme in Family Medicine in Gezira State, Sudan
    K. G. Mohamed, S. Hunskaar, S. H. Abdelrahman, E. M. Malik
    Advances in Medicine.2017; 2017: 1.     CrossRef
Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi  
Thokozani Bvumbwe
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:53.   Published online November 23, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.53
  • 26,445 View
  • 201 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item “nursing staff provided constructive feedback” (P=0.162). Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978). The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment.

Citations

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  • Levels, antecedents, and consequences of critical thinking among clinical nurses: a quantitative literature review
    Yongmi Lee, Younjae Oh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 26.     CrossRef
Pre-clinical versus clinical medical students’ attitudes towards the poor in the United States  
Danial Jilani, Ashley Fernandes, Nicole Borges
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:52.   Published online November 1, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.52
  • 36,983 View
  • 150 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study assessed the poverty-related attitudes of pre-clinical medical students (first and second years) versus clinical medical students (third and fourth years). First through fourth year medical students voluntarily completed the Attitude Towards Poverty scale. First and second year students were classified together in the preclinical group and third and fourth year students together in the clinical group. A total of 297 students participated (67% response rate). Statistically significant differences were noted between pre-clinical and clinical students for scores on the subscales personal deficiency (P<0.001), stigma (P=0.023), and for total scores (P=0.016). Scores across these subscales and for total scores were all higher in the clinical group. The only subscale which did not show statistical significance between pre-clinical and clinical students was the structural perspective. Medical students in their clinical training have a less favorable attitude towards the poor than their preclinical counterparts.

Citations

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  • Medical students attitudes toward and intention to work with the underserved: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Edouard Leaune, Violette Rey-Cadilhac, Safwan Oufker, Stéphanie Grot, Roy Strowd, Gilles Rode, Sonia Crandall
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical Students’ Perceptions of and Responses to Health Care Disparities During Clinical Clerkships
    Johanna Glaser, Alana Pfeffinger, Judy Quan, Alicia Fernandez
    Academic Medicine.2019; 94(8): 1190.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Developing a situational judgment test blueprint for assessing the non-cognitive skills of applicants to the University of Utah School of Medicine, the United States  
Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Karly Pippitt, Benjamin Chan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:51.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.51
  • 30,147 View
  • 202 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The situational judgment test (SJT) shows promise for assessing the non-cognitive skills of medical school applicants, but has only been used in Europe. Since the admissions processes and education levels of applicants to medical school are different in the United States and in Europe, it is necessary to obtain validity evidence of the SJT based on a sample of United States applicants. Methods: Ninety SJT items were developed and Kane’s validity framework was used to create a test blueprint. A total of 489 applicants selected for assessment/interview day at the University of Utah School of Medicine during the 2014-2015 admissions cycle completed one of five SJTs, which assessed professionalism, coping with pressure, communication, patient focus, and teamwork. Item difficulty, each item’s discrimination index, internal consistency, and the categorization of items by two experts were used to create the test blueprint. Results: The majority of item scores were within an acceptable range of difficulty, as measured by the difficulty index (0.50-0.85) and had fair to good discrimination. However, internal consistency was low for each domain, and 63% of items appeared to assess multiple domains. The concordance of categorization between the two educational experts ranged from 24% to 76% across the five domains. Conclusion: The results of this study will help medical school admissions departments determine how to begin constructing a SJT. Further testing with a more representative sample is needed to determine if the SJT is a useful assessment tool for measuring the non-cognitive skills of medical school applicants.

Citations

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  • New Advances in Physician Assistant Admissions: The History of Situational Judgement Tests and the Development of CASPer
    Shalon R. Buchs, M. Jane McDaniel
    Journal of Physician Assistant Education.2021; 32(2): 87.     CrossRef
  • The association between Situational Judgement Test (SJT) scores and professionalism concerns in undergraduate medical education
    Gurvinder S. Sahota, Jaspal S. Taggar
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(8): 937.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Behavioral Competencies for Effective Medical Practice in Nigeria
    Adanna Chukwuma, Uche Obi, Ifunanya Agu, Chinyere Mbachu
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2020; 7: 238212052097823.     CrossRef
  • Situational judgment test validity: an exploratory model of the participant response process using cognitive and think-aloud interviews
    Michael D. Wolcott, Nikki G. Lobczowski, Jacqueline M. Zeeman, Jacqueline E. McLaughlin
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Computerized test versus personal interview as admission methods for graduate nursing studies: A retrospective cohort study
    Koren Hazut, Pnina Romem, Smadar Malkin, Ilana Livshiz-Riven
    Nursing & Health Sciences.2016; 18(4): 503.     CrossRef
Visible Facebook profiles and e-professionalism in undergraduate medical students in India  
Setu Gupta, Satendra Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:50.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.50
  • 44,531 View
  • 182 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to assess medical students’ presence on Facebook and the extent of their visible activity, with particular reference to online professionalism. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including all medical students enrolled in the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, India during the period of the study, which was conducted from 2011 to 2012. After approval by the Institutional Ethical Committee, the full names of all students were obtained from our institution. After creating a fictitious profile, Facebook was searched for students’ profiles, and those found were examined for visible content and unprofessional behaviour. Results: Of 611 students, 477 (78.1%) had detectable Facebook profiles. Out of 477 profiles, date of birth, address, email, phone number, religion, and political views were rarely shared; sexual orientation and relationship status were displayed on approximately one third of the profiles; and an identifiable profile picture (80.3%), field of study (51.6%), and institution (86.2%) were commonly shared . The visible content included friend lists (88.7%), photo albums (36.1%), and associations with diverse groups and pages (97.1%). Five profiles (1.05%) displayed unprofessional content, including one profile photograph depicting alcohol consumption, one association with groups relating to excessive alcohol consumption, two profiles containing sexually explicit language, and one association with a sexist page. Conclusion: Most of our students use Facebook’s privacy settings to hide some content from others. Unprofessional content was rarely visible from a stranger’s profile. However, even when hidden from strangers, unprofessional behaviour is still unprofessional behaviour. As Facebook is an integral part of life, it is important for medical educators and students to understand the implications and importance of e-professionalism. Professionalism curricula should address e-professionalism.

Citations

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  • Online professionalism of Facebook usage in dental education: A retrospective exploration
    Tawepong Arayapisit, Jidapa Jarunsiripaisarn, Thitaree Setthamongkol, Dhitaya Ochaphan, Tanaporn Songsomsup, Kawin Sipiyaruk
    Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dangers and Benefits of Social Media on E-Professionalism of Health Care Professionals: Scoping Review
    Tea Vukušić Rukavina, Joško Viskić, Lovela Machala Poplašen, Danko Relić, Marko Marelić, Drazen Jokic, Kristijan Sedak
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2021; 23(11): e25770.     CrossRef
  • Student Experiences and Perceptions of Participation in Student-Led Health Clinics: A Systematic Review
    Lynne Briggs, Patricia Fronek
    Journal of Social Work Education.2020; 56(2): 238.     CrossRef
  • Impact of experience of psychiatrists and psychiatry residents regarding electronic communication and social networking on internet use patterns: a questionnaire survey for developing e-professionalism in South Korea
    Yeon Jung Lee, Jaeuk Hwang, Soyoung Irene Lee, Sung-Il Woo, Sang Woo Hahn, Steve Koh
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Social media platforms as a photo-elicitation tool in research on alcohol intoxication and gender
    Ryan Laws, Geoffrey Hunt, Tamar M. J. Antin
    Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.2018; 35(4): 288.     CrossRef
The role of prehealth student volunteers at a student-run free clinic in New York, United States  
Syed H. Shabbir, Maria Teresa M. Santos
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:49.   Published online October 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.49
  • 24,923 View
  • 132 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The medical student-run Einstein Community Health Outreach Clinic provides free healthcare to the uninsured adult population of New York, the United States. During the summer, prehealth student volunteers are recruited to assist with clinic operations. Methods: We designed a survey study to identify the baseline characteristics of the volunteers between June and August of 2013 and 2014 in order to evaluate the influence of working in a medical student-run free clinic on their education, impressions, and career goals. Results: A total of 38 volunteers (response rate, 83%) participated in the study. The volunteers were demographically diverse and interested in primary care specialties and community service. Conclusion: After the Einstein Community Health Outreach program, the volunteers showed an improved understanding of the healthcare process and issues relevant to uninsured patients. They also developed favorable attitudes towards primary care medicine and an increased level of interest in pursuing careers in primary care.

Citations

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  • The Impact of Student-Faculty Collaborative Clinics on Patients’ Health Seeking Behaviors in Underserved Communities
    Rewan Abdelwahab, Sarah Abdelwahab, Maria Kaltchenko, Mie Hallman, Gina Kruse, Jacqueline T. Chu, Marya J. Cohen
    Journal of Community Health.2022; 47(2): 378.     CrossRef
  • Student Experiences and Perceptions of Participation in Student-Led Health Clinics: A Systematic Review
    Lynne Briggs, Patricia Fronek
    Journal of Social Work Education.2020; 56(2): 238.     CrossRef
Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States  
Sonja E. Raaum, Christian Arbelaez, Carlos Eduardo Vallejo, Andres M. Patino, Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Caroline K. Milne
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:48.   Published online October 29, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.48
  • 25,506 View
  • 139 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps) that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two United States academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. Methods: In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100%) were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text) and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%). The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2%) was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44 (33.0%, P<0.001). The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1%) than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%, P=0.035), and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6%) in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%, P= 0.001). The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5%) than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P=0.044). Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use. Conclusion: Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.

Citations

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    Gizaw Hailiye, Binyam Cheklu Tilahun, Habtamu Alganeh Guadie, Ashenafi Tazebew Amare
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    João Mesquita, Natasha Maniar, Tina Baykaner, Albert J. Rogers, Mark Swerdlow, Mahmood I. Alhusseini, Fatemah Shenasa, Catarina Brizido, Daniel Matos, Pedro Freitas, Ana Rita Santos, Gustavo Rodrigues, Claudia Silva, Miguel Rodrigo, Yan Dong, Paul Clopton
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  • Learning strategies among adult CHD fellows
    Jouke P. Bokma, Joshua A. Daily, Adrienne H. Kovacs, Erwin N. Oechslin, Helmut Baumgartner, Paul Khairy, Barbara J.M. Mulder, Gruschen R. Veldtman
    Cardiology in the Young.2019; 29(11): 1356.     CrossRef
  • Incorporating sleep medicine content into medical school through neuroscience core curricula
    Rachel Marie E. Salas, Roy E. Strowd, Imran Ali, Madhu Soni, Logan Schneider, Joseph Safdieh, Bradley V. Vaughn, Alon Y. Avidan, Jane B. Jeffery, Charlene E. Gamaldo
    Neurology.2018; 91(13): 597.     CrossRef
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    Susie T. Harris, Paul D. Bell, Elizabeth A. Baker
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Brief Reports
Moroccan medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment  
Jihane Belayachi, Rachid Razine, Amina Boufars, Asma Saadi, Naoufal Madani, Souad Chaouir, Redouane Abouqal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:47.   Published online October 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.47
  • 25,353 View
  • 149 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to assess students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, in which medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment were assessed using the DREEM criteria during the 2013-2014 academic years. The DREEM inventory encompasses 50 items divided into five subdomains: perceptions of learning, perceptions of teaching, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. The DREEM has a maximum score of 200, which would correspond to a perfect educational environment. The mean scores (±standard deviation) of students’ responses were compared according to their year of study and gender. The responses of 189 postgraduate medical students were included. The mean total DREEM score was 90.8 (45.4%). The mean total scores for five subdomains were 21.2/48 (44.2%), 21.8/44 (49.6%), 13.1/32 (40.9%), 19.0/48 (39.6%), and 15.6/28 (55.7%) respectively. Female students reported higher perceptions of teaching scores than males (P=0.002), and students in their fifth year of study reported significantly higher social self-perceptions scores than those in their fourth year (P=0.03). In this study of the oldest faculty of medicine in Morocco, students perceived the educational environment as having many problems.

Citations

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  • Exploring student perceptions of the learning environment in four health professions education programs
    Shayna A. Rusticus, Derek Wilson, Tal Jarus, Kathy O’Flynn-Magee, Simon Albon
    Learning Environments Research.2022; 25(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Nurse students' perception of the academic learning environment in Tunisian institutes of nursing sciences: A multisite cross-sectional study
    Khouloud Boukhris, Chekib Zedini, Mariem El Ghardallou
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 111: 105316.     CrossRef
  • Educational Environment Assessment by Multiprofessional Residency Students: New Horizons Based on Evidence from the DREEM
    Ana Carolina Arantes Coutinho Costa, Nilce Maria da Silva Campos Costa, Edna Regina Silva Pereira
    Medical Science Educator.2021; 31(2): 429.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Mentoring Environment Through Thematic Analysis of the Learning Environment in Medical Education: a Systematic Review
    Jia Min Hee, Hong Wei Yap, Zheng Xuan Ong, Simone Qian Min Quek, Ying Pin Toh, Stephen Mason, Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019; 34(10): 2190.     CrossRef
  • Mental health and wellbeing among Moroccan medical students: a descriptive study
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Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Nalucha Siyanga
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:46.   Published online September 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.46
  • 26,845 View
  • 156 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills.

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  • Examining anxiety and stress regarding virtual learning in colleges of health sciences: A cross-sectional study in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia
    Tahani Alshammari, Sarah Alseraye, Rawabi Alqasim, Aleksandra Rogowska, Nouf Alrasheed, Musaad Alshammari
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Research Articles
Dental students’ perceptions of undergraduate clinical training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in an integrated curriculum in Saudi Arabia  
Mahmoud Al-Dajani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:45.   Published online September 24, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.45
  • 54,045 View
  • 204 Download
  • 14 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim was to understand dental students’ experiences with oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) teaching, their confidence levels in performing routine dento-alveolar operations, and the relationship between the students’ confidence level and the number of teeth extracted during the clinical practice. Methods: The survey questionnaire was distributed to 32 students at Aljouf University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia during their fourth and fifth year in 2015. Respondents were asked to rate 19 items, which represent a student’s confidence in performing routine surgical interventions, using a four-point Likert scale (1=very little confidence, 4=very confident). A multivariate regression was computed between average confidence and the variables: weekly hours devoted to studying oral and maxillofacial surgery, college grade point average, and the total number of teeth extracted. Results: The response rate was 100%. Students revealed the highest level of confidence in giving local anesthesia (96.9%), understanding extraction indications (93.8%), and performing simple extractions (90.6%). Less confidence was shown with handling difficult extractions (50.0%), extracting molars with separation (50.0%) or extracting third molars (56.3%). The average confidence in performing surgical procedures was 2.88 (SD=0.55), ranging from 1.79 to 3.89. A given student’s confidence increased with an increase in the total number of teeth extracted (P=0.003). Conclusion: It reveals a significant impact of undergraduate clinical training on students’ confidence in performing oral and maxillofacial surgery clinical procedures: The more clinical experience the students had, the more confidence they reported.

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    Mahmoud Al-Dajani
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Modifiable variables in physical therapy education programs associated with first-time and three-year National Physical Therapy Examination pass rates in the United States  
Chad Cook, Chalee Engelhard, Michel D. Landry, Christine McCallum
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:44.   Published online September 23, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.44
  • 26,609 View
  • 167 Download
  • 11 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to examine the modifiable programmatic characteristics reflected in the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) Annual Accreditation Report for all accredited programs that reported pass rates on the National Physical Therapist Examination, and to build a predictive model for first-time and three-year ultimate pass rates. Methods: This observational study analyzed programmatic information from the 185 CAPTE-accredited physical therapy programs in the United States and Puerto Rico out of a total of 193 programs that provided the first-time and three-year ultimate pass rates in 2011. Fourteen predictive variables representing student selection and composition, clinical education length and design, and general program length and design were analyzed against first-time pass rates and ultimate pass rates on the NPTE. Univariate and multivariate multinomial regression analysis for first-time pass rates and logistic regression analysis for three-year ultimate pass rates were performed. Results: The variables associated with the first-time pass rate in the multivariate analysis were the mean undergraduate grade point average (GPA) and the average age of the cohort. Multivariate analysis showed that mean undergraduate GPA was associated with the three-year ultimate pass rate. Conclusions: Mean undergraduate GPA was found to be the only modifiable predictor for both first-time and three-year pass rates among CAPTE-accredited physical therapy programs.

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions