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Volume 11; 2014
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Brief Report
Assessment of the learning environment in prosthodontic department based on Dental College Learning Environment Survey by the graduates of a dental institute in India  
Shigli Kamal, Hebbal Mamata
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:34.   Published online December 22, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.34
  • 25,144 View
  • 193 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of this study was to determine dental graduates’ perceptions of learning environment in a prosthodontic department in a dental institute in India. The 60-item closed-ended, cross-sectional questionnaire with five options was completed by the dental graduates and the dentists. The data obtained was analyzed using statistical software. The mean, SD, frequency and percentages were calculated wherever appropriate. The questionnaire was answered by 242 dentists and dental graduates. Of the seven Dental College Learning Environment Survey scales, the highest mean scores were for student to student interaction (2.76 ± 0.53) followed by meaningful learning experience (2.67 ± 0.39). The lowest scores were for flexibility (2.26 ± 0.51) followed by supportiveness (2.40 ± 0.59). The lowest mean scores obtained for the ‘flexibility scale’ conveys that the opportunity for the faculty and students to modify the learning environment are less than for the other categories, and there is thus a need to modify the learning environment. Faculty should also increase their support to the students by contributing to an effective and meaningful interaction by creating a congenial environment.
Research Article
Medical doctors as the captain of a ship: an analysis of medical students’ book reports on Joseph Conrad’s “Lord Jim”  
Kun Hwang, Seung Jae Lee, Seong Yeon Kim, Se Won Hwang, Ae Yang Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:33.   Published online November 27, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.33
  • 21,632 View
  • 123 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
In South Korean ferry disaster in 2014, the captain abandoned the ship with passengers including high school students still aboard. We noticed the resemblance of abandoning the ship with passengers still aboard the ferry (named the Sewol) and the ship Patna, which was full of pilgrims, in Joseph Conrad’s novel “Lord Jim.” The aim of this study is to see how medical students think about the role of a medical doctor as a captain of a ship by analyzing book reports on Conrad’s “Lord Jim.” Methods: Participants included 49 third-year medical students. Their book reports were analyzed. Results: If placed in the same situation as the character of Jim, 24 students of the 49 respondents answered that they would stay with the passengers, while 18 students indicated they would escape from the ship with the crew. Most of the students thought the role of a doctor in the medical field was like that of a ‘captain.’ The medical students reported that they wanted to be a doctor who is responsible for his or her patients, highly moral, warm-hearted, honest, and with high self-esteem. Conclusion: In conclusion, we found that “Lord Jim” induced the virtue of ‘responsibility’ from the medical students. Consequently, “Lord Jim” could be good teaching material for medical humanities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of the perceptions of medical students applying contextual relevance to literature
    Kun Hwang, Ae Yang Kim, Hun Kim
    The Asia Pacific Scholar.2018; 3(2): 47.     CrossRef
Letters to Editor
Medical humanities: developing into a mainstream discipline
P. Ravi Shankar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:32.   Published online November 26, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.32
  • 24,719 View
  • 194 Download
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Designing and conducting a two day orientation program for first semester undergraduate medical students
P. Ravi Shankar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:31.   Published online November 25, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.31
  • 33,152 View
  • 162 Download
  • 3 Citations
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Foundation course – A fundamental requirement for Indian medical graduates as per graduate medical regulations
    M. Ganesh, A. Manikandan, Rakchna Muthukathan
    Sri Ramachandra Journal of Health Sciences.2022; 2: 2.     CrossRef
  • Challenges in shifting to an integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 9.     CrossRef
  • Initiating small group learning in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 10.     CrossRef
Research Article
Learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia  
Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:30.   Published online November 24, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.30
  • 26,373 View
  • 173 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Learning style preferences vary within the nursing field and there is no consensus on a predominant learning style preference in nursing students. The current study compared the learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia. Methods: A purposive sampling method was used to collect data from the two study populations. Data were collected using the Learning Style Scale (LSS), which is a valid and reliable inventory. The LSS consists of 22 items with five subscales including perceptive, solitary, analytic, imaginative, and competitive. The questionnaires were distributed at the end of the academic year during regular class time for optimum response. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the learning style preferences between the two study populations. Results: A significant difference was found in perceptive, solitary, and analytic learning styles between two groups of nursing students. However, there was no significant difference in imaginative and competitive learning styles between the two groups. Most of the students were in the middle range of the learning styles. Conclusion: There were similarities and differences in learning style preferences between Zabol Medical Sciences University (ZBMU) and University Sains Malaysia (USM) nursing students. The USM nursing students were more sociable and analytic learners, whereas the ZBMU nursing students were more solitary and perceptive learners.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Self‐directed learning readiness and learning styles among Omani nursing students: Implications for online learning during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Cherry Ann C. Ballad, Leodoro Jabien Labrague, Arcalyd Rose R. Cayaban, Oscar M. Turingan, Siham Mahmoud Al Balushi
    Nursing Forum.2022; 57(1): 94.     CrossRef
  • Effects of an Adaptive Education Program on the Learning, Mental Health and Work Intentions of New Graduate Nurses
    Shu-Fen Chen, Yu-Wen Fang, Mei-Hua Wang, Tze-Fang Wang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(11): 5891.     CrossRef
  • Instruments to evaluate undergraduate healthcare student learning styles globally: A scoping review
    Daniel Gonçalves Campos, Juliany Lino Gomes Silva, Melissa Jarvill, Roberta Cunha M. Rodrigues, Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira Kumakura, Daniel Gonçalves Campos
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 107: 105141.     CrossRef
  • Associations of learning style with cultural values and demographics in nursing students in Iran and Malaysia
    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 42.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions  
Elizabeth Shanika Esparaz, S. Bruce Binder, Nicole J. Borges
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:29.   Published online November 23, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.29
  • 23,475 View
  • 133 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students’ ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%–86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student’s t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies.

Citations

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  • Medical Schools’ Ophthalmology Course: An Appraisal by Ophthalmology Residents
    Yahya Abdulrahman Al-Najmi, Ahmed Hussein Subki, Nazih Suwalih Alzaidi, Nadeem Shafique Butt, Alaa Abdulhamid Alsammahi, Firas Mohamed Madani, Mohammed Saad Alsallum, Rakan Salah Al-Harbi, Nizar Mohammed Alhibshi
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 8365.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative analysis of medical students’ and physicians’ knowledge of degenerative cervical myelopathy
    Mueez Waqar, Jane Wilcock, Jayne Garner, Benjamin Davies, Mark Kotter
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(1): e028455.     CrossRef
  • Ophthalmology training and competency levels in caring for patients with ophthalmic complaints among United States internal medicine, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents
    Christopher Daniel Gelston, Jennifer Landrigan Patnaik
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 25.     CrossRef
What steps are necessary to create written or web-based selected-response assessments?  
Matt Morgan, Valerie Dory, Stuart Lubarsky, Kieran Walsh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:28.   Published online November 8, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.28
  • 22,870 View
  • 173 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Before we work out what constitutes an assessment’s value for a given cost in medical education, we must first outline the steps necessary to create an assessment, and then assign a cost to each step. In this study we undertook the first phase of this process: we sought to work out all the steps necessary to create written selected-response assessments. First, the lead author created an initial list of potential steps for developing written assessments. This was then distributed to the other three authors. These authors independently added further steps to the list. The lead author incorporated the contributions of these others and created a second draft. This process was repeated until consensus was achieved amongst the study’s authors. Next, the list was shared by means of an online questionnaire with 100 healthcare professionals with experience in medical education. The results of the authors’ and healthcare professionals’ thoughts and feedback on the steps, needed to create written assessment, are outlined below in full. We outlined the steps that are necessary to create written or web-based selected-response assessments.
Higher stress scores for female medical students measured by the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) in Pakistan  
Khadija Qamar, Muhammad Rizwan Bash Kiani, Aisha Ayyub, Atif Ahmed Khan, Mohammad Osama
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:27.   Published online October 9, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.27
  • 24,283 View
  • 153 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study was to determine the stress level of medical students and the relationship between stress and academic year. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted at an undergraduate medical school with a five-year curriculum, in Pakistan, from January 2014 to April 2014. Medical students in the first four years were included in the study. The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), a self-administered questionnaire, was distributed to the students. A total of 445 medical students completed the questionnaire. The average stress score was 19.61 (SD = 6.76) with a range from 10 to 43. Stress was experienced by 169 students (41.7%). The scores of female students were higher than scores of males, indicating a higher stress level (P = 0.011). The relationship between stress and academic year was insignificant (P = 0.392).

Citations

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  • Mental well-being in Sri Lankan medical students: a cross-sectional study
    Courtney E. Wimberly, Harshini Rajapakse, Lawrence P. Park, Ashley Price, Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell, Truls Østbye
    Psychology, Health & Medicine.2022; 27(6): 1213.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use disorder and its associated factors among residents in Southern Ethiopia during the era of COVID-19
    Habtamu Endashaw Hareru, Abdene Weya Kaso, Berhanu Gidisa Debela, Lulu Abebe, Daniel Sisay W/tsadik, Reta Kassa Abebe, Chalachew Kassaw
    SAGE Open Medicine.2022; 10: 205031212211050.     CrossRef
  • The impact of COVID‐related economic shocks on household mental health in Pakistan
    Victoria Baranov, Pauline Grosjean, Fatima Jamal Khan, Sarah Walker
    Health Economics.2022; 31(10): 2208.     CrossRef
  • Difference of Psychological Distress among First- and Third-year Indonesian Medical Students
    Cut Rika Pratiwi, Bahagia Loebis, Vita Camellia, Elmeida Effendy
    Open Access Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 10(T7): 150.     CrossRef
  • Family support and psychological distress among commuter college students
    Jennifer Parker, Abigail Yacoub, Sahira Mughal, Fadi Mamari
    Journal of American College Health.2021; : 1.     CrossRef
  • A novel model to predict mental distress among medical graduate students in China
    Fei Guo, Min Yi, Li Sun, Ting Luo, Ruili Han, Lanlan Zheng, Shengyang Jin, Jun Wang, Mingxing Lei, Changjun Gao
    BMC Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The assessment of stress level, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and defense mechanisms among Polish and English medical students
    M. Pawlaczyk, J. Siembida, K. Balaj, A. Rajewska-Rager
    Annals of General Psychiatry.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Helping Students Keep the Promise: Exploring how Kalamazoo Promise Scholars’ Basic Needs, Motivation, and Engagement Correlate to Performance and Persistence in a 4-Year Institution
    Daniel Collier, Ceceilia Parnther, Dan Fitzpatrick, Chelsea Brehm, Andrea Beach
    Innovative Higher Education.2019; 44(5): 333.     CrossRef
  • Coming to College Hungry: How Food Insecurity Relates to Amotivation, Stress, Engagement, and First-Semester Performance in a 4-Year University
    Daniel Collier, Dan Fitzpatrick, Chelsea Brehm, Eric Archer
    SSRN Electronic Journal.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and correlates of psychological stress among teachers at a national key comprehensive university in China
    Wenjun Li, Changgui Kou
    International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health.2018; 24(1-2): 7.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Assessment of professional competency and need of smoking cessation counseling for dental students  
Rajani A. Dable, Pradnya B. Wasnik, Babita R. Pawar, Sujit S. Bopardikar, Sunilkumar N. Nagmode
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:26.   Published online October 5, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.26
  • 23,236 View
  • 132 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim of this study was to analyze the smoking prevalence among dental students and to assess the need for promoting tobacco education and intervention by exploring their knowledge about smoking related risk factors. The study also examined the attitudes and practices of the students toward tobacco consumption, and their responsibilities toward the community. Methods: In total, 53 male students participated in the study (21 juniors and 32 seniors). The training program was divided into three modules, and the questionnaire was administered before and after the counseling sessions, which provided the comparative data on the students’ views about smoking cessation. Results: The most commonly practiced mode of tobacco consumption was found to be cigarette smoking (90.6 %), while a few consumed Gutkha (9.4%). All the junior students (100%) reported to have been benefitted by the counseling program, while 68.8% of the students from the senior group reported the same. Bivariate statistical analysis was conducted using the Pearson’s chi-square test for testing the difference across the age groups. P-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Conclusion: Curbing tobacco influence on dental students in their initial days can ensure a smoke-free life for them, as well as prevents them from feeling embarrassed or experiencing a lack of confidence while seeing their patients. Thus, tobacco education and intervention programs can motivate the students and increase their potential to be credible advisors regarding smoking cessation.

Citations

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  • Development and Validation of an Evaluation Tool to Measure the Effectiveness of a Smoking Cessation Training among Healthcare Providers in Malaysia: The Providers’ Smoking Cessation Training Evaluation (ProSCiTE)
    Siti Idayu Hasan, Farizah Mohd Hairi, Amer Siddiq Amer Nordin, Mahmoud Danaee
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(21): 4297.     CrossRef
Teaching methods in community health nursing clerkships: experiences of healthcare staff in Iran  
Eshagh Ildarabadi, Hossein Karimi-Moonaghi, Abbas Heydari, Ali Taghipour, Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Azizollah Arbabisarjou
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:25.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.25
  • 26,411 View
  • 181 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Healthcare staff educate nursing students during their clerkships at community health nursing programs. Their teaching methods play an important role in nursing students’ acquisition of competencies; however, these methods have not been studied thoroughly. Thus, this study aims to describe, interpret, and understand the experiences of healthcare staff’s teaching methods in clerkships at a community health nursing program. Methods: This study was conducted using purposeful sampling and semi-structured interviews with 13 members of the staff of three urban healthcare centers in Iran. The data were analyzed through qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis. Results: Multiplicity of teaching was identified as the main category of teaching method, and the five subcategories were teaching through lecture, demonstration, doing, visits and field trips, and readiness. The most common method used by the healthcare staff was lecturing. Conclusion: The healthcare staff used multiple methods to teach students in the nursing clerkship of the community health program, which was the strength of the course. However, they should be familiar with, and utilize additional methods, such as discussion rather than lecture.

Citations

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  • Improving nursing student self-confidence and competence through integrated public health care training
    Stefanus Mendes Kiik, Muhammad Saleh Nuwa, Yasinta Betan, Irlin Falde Riti
    Kontakt.2022; 24(1): 43.     CrossRef
  • Community Health Nursing in Iran: A Review of Challenges and Solutions (An Integrative Review)
    Aazam Hosseinnejad, Maryam Rassouli, Simin Jahani, Nasrin Elahi, Shahram Molavynejad
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Prefrontal hemodynamic responses and the degree of flow experience among occupational therapy students during their performance of a cognitive task  
Kazuki Hirao
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:24.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.24
  • 26,088 View
  • 169 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Although flow experience is positively associated with motivation to learn, the biological basis of flow experience is poorly understood. Accumulation of evidence on the underlying brain mechanisms related to flow is necessary for a deeper understanding of the motivation to learn. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between flow experience and brain function using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during the performance of a cognitive task. Methods: Sixty right-handed occupational therapy (OT) students participated in this study. These students performed a verbal fluency test (VFT) while 2-channel NIRS was used to assess changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxygenated hemoglobin [oxy-Hb]) in the prefrontal cortex. Soon after that, the OT students answered the flow questionnaire (FQ) to assess the degree of flow experience during the VFT. Results: Average oxy-Hb in the prefrontal cortex had a significant negative correlation with the satisfaction scores on the FQ. Conclusion: Satisfaction during the flow experience correlated with prefrontal hemodynamic suppression. This finding may assist in understanding motivation to learn and related flow experience.

Citations

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  • Immersion in Substance-Related and Behavioural Addictions: Neural Systems and Neurochemical Substrates
    Fiza Arshad, Luke Clark
    Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports.2022; 9(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The brain in flow: A systematic review on the neural basis of the flow state
    Clara Alameda, Daniel Sanabria, Luis F. Ciria
    Cortex.2022; 154: 348.     CrossRef
  • A neurocognitive model of flow states and the role of cerebellar internal models
    Joshua Gold, Joseph Ciorciari
    Behavioural Brain Research.2021; 407: 113244.     CrossRef
  • Prefrontal cortex hypoactivity distinguishes severe from mild-to-moderate social anxiety as revealed by a palm-sized near-infrared spectroscopy system
    Hiroyuki Uchida, Kazuki Hirao
    Journal of Neural Transmission.2020; 127(9): 1305.     CrossRef
  • A Review on the Role of the Neuroscience of Flow States in the Modern World
    Joshua Gold, Joseph Ciorciari
    Behavioral Sciences.2020; 10(9): 137.     CrossRef
Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school  
P. Ravi Shankar, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Neelam R. Dwivedi, Vivek Nuguri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:23.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.23
  • 34,996 View
  • 199 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2%) participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

Citations

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  • Using generalizability analysis to estimate parameters for anatomy assessments: A multi-institutional study
    Jessica N. Byram, Mark F. Seifert, William S. Brooks, Laura Fraser-Cotlin, Laura E. Thorp, James M. Williams, Adam B. Wilson
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2017; 10(2): 109.     CrossRef
  • Recall of Theoretical Pharmacology Knowledge by 6th Year Medical Students and Interns of Three Medical Schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    A. A. Mustafa, H. A. Alassiry, A. Al-Turki, N. Alamri, N. A. Alhamdan, Abdalla Saeed
    Education Research International.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
  • Designing and conducting a two day orientation program for first semester undergraduate medical students
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 31.     CrossRef
Learning Style Scales: a valid and reliable questionnaire  
Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:22.   Published online August 18, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.22
  • 27,859 View
  • 263 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Learning-style instruments assist students in developing their own learning strategies and outcomes, in eliminating learning barriers, and in acknowledging peer diversity. Only a few psychometrically validated learning-style instruments are available. This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable learning-style instrument for nursing students. Methods: A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in two nursing schools in two countries. A purposive sample of 156 undergraduate nursing students participated in the study. Face and content validity was obtained from an expert panel. The LSS construct was established using principal axis factoring (PAF) with oblimin rotation, a scree plot test, and parallel analysis (PA). The reliability of LSS was tested using Cronbach’s α, corrected item-total correlation, and test-retest. Results: Factor analysis revealed five components, confirmed by PA and a relatively clear curve on the scree plot. Component strength and interpretability were also confirmed. The factors were labeled as perceptive, solitary, analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles. Cronbach’s α was > 0.70 for all subscales in both study populations. The corrected item-total correlations were > 0.30 for the items in each component. Conclusion: The LSS is a valid and reliable inventory for evaluating learning style preferences in nursing students in various multicultural environments.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Self‐directed learning readiness and learning styles among Omani nursing students: Implications for online learning during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Cherry Ann C. Ballad, Leodoro Jabien Labrague, Arcalyd Rose R. Cayaban, Oscar M. Turingan, Siham Mahmoud Al Balushi
    Nursing Forum.2022; 57(1): 94.     CrossRef
  • Development of a novel, theoretically motivated scale to assess cognitive learning styles related to the autism spectrum
    Seyed Mohammad Mahdi Moshirian Farahi, Craig Leth-Steensen
    BMC Psychiatry.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Examination of Pre-Service Teachers’ Interpersonal Dispositions in the Readiness Assurance Stage of Team-Based Learning
    Shenghua Zha, Pamela Moore, Brandon Browning, Jennifer Fetner, Yolany Lagos Ortiz
    Action in Teacher Education.2021; 43(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Instruments to evaluate undergraduate healthcare student learning styles globally: A scoping review
    Daniel Gonçalves Campos, Juliany Lino Gomes Silva, Melissa Jarvill, Roberta Cunha M. Rodrigues, Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira Kumakura, Daniel Gonçalves Campos
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 107: 105141.     CrossRef
  • Associations of learning style with cultural values and demographics in nursing students in Iran and Malaysia
    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 42.     CrossRef
  • Learning style preferences of nursing students at two universities in Iran and Malaysia
    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 30.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters  
Ryan Whitt, Gregory Toussaint, S. Bruce Binder, Nicole J. Borges
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:21.   Published online August 17, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.21
  • 22,023 View
  • 141 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP) encounters strengthen third-year medical students’ communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios) were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students’ self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n = 215; response rate, 96%) analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students’ perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P < 0.05; Bonferroni correction, P < 0.006). There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents.

Citations

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  • Preparing for Pediatrics: Experiential Learning Helps Medical Students Prepare for Their Clinical Placement
    Clare Sullivan, Claire Condron, Claire Mulhall, Mohammad Almulla, Maria Kelly, Daire O'Leary, Walter Eppich
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improving Patient- and Family-Centered Communication in Pediatrics: A Review of Simulation-Based Learning
    Eleanor Peterson, Rebecca Morgan, Aaron Calhoun
    Pediatric Annals.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • ‘Demystifying’ the encounter with adolescent patients: a qualitative study on medical students’ experiences and perspectives during training with adolescent simulated patients
    Yusuke Leo Takeuchi, Raphaël Bonvin, Anne-Emmanuelle Ambresin
    Medical Education Online.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Student Perception of Preparedness for Clinical Management of Adults With Lifelong Disability Using a Standardized Patient Assessment
    Lisa Dannemiller, Elshimaa Basha, Wendy Kriekels, Amy Nordon-Craft
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2017; 31(4): 76.     CrossRef
Research Article
Reflective writing and its impact on empathy in medical education: systematic review  
Isabel Chen, Connor Forbes
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:20.   Published online August 16, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.20
  • 42,790 View
  • 396 Download
  • 51 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Medical schools are increasingly aware of the ways in which physician empathy can have a profound impact on patients’ lives and have developed humanities initiatives to address this concern. Reflective writing in particular is more commonly promoted in medical curricula, but there is limited research on the impact of reflective writing on medical student empathy levels. It aims to find the emotional effects of reflective writing interventions on medical and healthcare students by systemic review. Methods: Two investigators independently reviewed educational publications for critical analysis. This review focused systematically on quantitative papers that measure the impact of reflective writing on empathy. Results: Of the 1,032 studies found on Medline and CINAHL, only 8 used quantitative measures pre- and postwritten reflection to measure any impact on empathy outcomes. The outcomes measured included impact of reflective writing exercises on student wellness, aptitude, and/or clinical skills. Of these studies, a significant change in student empathy was observed in 100% of the studies, demonstrating a significant change in outcomes. Conclusion: Although the lack of homogeneity in outcome measurement in the literature limits possible conclusion from this review, the overwhelmingly positive reporting of outcomes suggests that reflective writing should be considered in any medical curriculum.

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions