Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Funded articles

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Funded articles
94 Funded articles
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Research article
Obstetrics and gynecology residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after an anal sphincter injury simulation-based workshop in Indonesia: a pre- and post-intervention comparison study  
Riska Wahyuningtyas, Eighty Mardiyan Kurniawati, Budi Utomo, Gatut Hardianto, Hari Paraton, Tri Hastono, Djoko Kuswanto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:4.   Published online February 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.4
Funded: Universitas Airlangga
  • 3,105 View
  • 403 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Obstetric anal sphincter injury is one of the most common complications during delivery. Simulation models with manikins can be used as an effective medical learning method to improve students’ abilities before encountering patients. The present study aimed to describe the development of an anal sphincter injury model and to assess residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after a perineal repair workshop with an anal sphincter injury simulator in Indonesia.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study with evaluation of outcomes before and after the workshop. We created a silicone-latex simulation anal sphincter injury model. Then, we validated this simulation and used it as a simulation model for the workshop. We asked residents about their satisfaction with repairing anal sphincter injuries using a simulation model and residents’ self-confidence when practicing anal sphincter injury repair.
Results
All residents felt the simulation-based workshop was valuable (100%). Most of the scores for the similarity of the simulation model were good (about 8 out of maximum 10). The self-assessment of confidence was measured before and after the workshop. Overall self-confidence increased significantly after the workshop in identifying the external sphincter ani (EAS) (P=0.031), suturing the anal mucosa (P=0.001), suturing the internal sphincter ani (P=0.001), suturing the EAS (P<0.001), and evaluating the sphincter ani tone (P=0.016).
Conclusion
The anal sphincter injury simulator improved residents’ self-confidence in identifying the EAS, suturing the anal mucosa, suturing the internal sphincter ani, suturing the EAS, and evaluating sphincter ani tone.
Educational/faculty development materials
Environmental management education using immersive virtual reality in asthmatic children in Korea: a randomized controlled study (secondary publication)  
Seung Hyun Kim, Sang Hyun Park, Insoon Kang, Yuyoung Song, Jaehoon Lim, Wonsuck Yoon, Young Yoo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:15.   Published online July 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.15
Funded: Environmental Health Center for Childhood Asthma, Ministry of Environmental, Allergy Immunology Center
  • 4,699 View
  • 188 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Awareness of environmental control is considered a significant influence on the performance of asthma self-management behaviors, which are involved in maintaining effective asthma control. This study aimed to investigate whether immersive virtual reality (VR) education is effective in environmental control education for asthmatic children in Korea. Thirty asthmatic children aged 9 to 13 years with aeroallergen sensitization were enrolled. Environmental control education for asthmatic participants was performed using immersive VR (VR group) or conventional leaflets provided by asthma specialists (control group). Five questionnaires, on awareness of environmental control, memory, assessment of intent to act, a satisfaction test, and an Asthma Control Test (ACT), were used to estimate the effects of education. The scores for awareness of environmental control, memory, and intent to act significantly increased after education in both groups, and the scores remained high until 4 weeks after education. Both groups’ ACT scores were consistently high before and 4 weeks after education. Satisfaction scores were very high in the VR group. The increased scores in awareness of environmental control and intent to act indicate that the environmental control education using VR is worthy of attention as an effective educational tool for asthma management. Further developed techniques, including active environmental interventions by participants in VR, could be applied to effective asthma management.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials on Virtual Reality Application in Pediatric Patients
    Ashish Varma, Waqar M Naqvi, Salima Mulla, Samana Syed, Sumit Thakur, Sakshi P Arora, Anuj R Varma, Smruti Besekar
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study
    Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 25.     CrossRef
Research articles
Possibility of using the yes/no Angoff method as a substitute for the percent Angoff method for estimating the cutoff score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination: a simulation study
Janghee Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:23.   Published online August 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.23
Funded: Soonchunhyang University Research Fund
  • 724 View
  • 115 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The percent Angoff (PA) method has been recommended as a reliable method to set the cutoff score instead of a fixed cut point of 60% in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). The yes/no Angoff (YNA) method, which is easy for panelists to judge, can be considered as an alternative because the KMLE has many items to evaluate. This study aimed to compare the cutoff score and the reliability depending on whether the PA or the YNA standard-setting method was used in the KMLE.
Methods
The materials were the open-access PA data of the KMLE. The PA data were converted to YNA data in 5 categories, in which the probabilities for a “yes” decision by panelists were 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%. SPSS for descriptive analysis and G-string for generalizability theory were used to present the results.
Results
The PA method and the YNA method counting 60% as “yes,” estimated similar cutoff scores. Those cutoff scores were deemed acceptable based on the results of the Hofstee method. The highest reliability coefficients estimated by the generalizability test were from the PA method and the YNA method, with probabilities of 70%, 80%, 60%, and 50% for deciding “yes,” in descending order. The panelist’s specialty was the main cause of the error variance. The error size was similar regardless of the standard-setting method.
Conclusion
The above results showed that the PA method was more reliable than the YNA method in estimating the cutoff score of the KMLE. However, the YNA method with a 60% probability for deciding “yes” also can be used as a substitute for the PA method in estimating the cutoff score of the KMLE.
Agreement between medical students’ peer assessments and faculty assessments in advanced resuscitation skills examinations in South Korea  
Jinwoo Jeong, Song Yi Park, Kyung Hoon Sun
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:4.   Published online March 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.4
Funded: Dong-A University
  • 4,098 View
  • 276 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In medical education, peer assessment is considered to be an effective learning strategy. Although several studies have examined agreement between peer and faculty assessments regarding basic life support (BLS), few studies have done so for advanced resuscitation skills (ARS) such as intubation and defibrillation. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the degree of agreement between medical students’ and faculty assessments of ARS examinations.
Methods
This retrospective explorative study was conducted during the emergency medicine (EM) clinical clerkship of fourth-year medical students from April to July 2020. A faculty assessor (FA) and a peer assessor (PA) assessed each examinee’s resuscitation skills (including BLS, intubation, and defibrillation) using a checklist that consisted of 20 binary items (performed or not performed) and 1 global proficiency rating using a 5-point Likert scale. The prior examinee assessed the next examinee after feedback and training as a PA. All 54 students participated in peer assessment. The assessments of 44 FA/PA pairs were analyzed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Gwet’s first-order agreement coefficient.
Results
The PA scores were higher than the FA scores (mean±standard deviation, 20.2±2.5 [FA] vs. 22.3±2.4 [PA]; P<0.001). The agreement was poor to moderate for the overall checklist (ICC, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31 to 0.73; P<0.01), BLS (ICC, 0.19; 95% CI, -0.11 to 0.46; P<0.10), intubation (ICC, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.70; P<0.01), and defibrillation (ICC, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.68; P<0.01).
Conclusion
Senior medical students showed unreliable agreement in ARS assessments compared to faculty assessments. If a peer assessment is planned in skills education, comprehensive preparation and sufficient assessor training should be provided in advance.
Brief report
Effects of a simulation-based blended training model on nurses’ treatment decision-related knowledge about oral cancer in Taiwan: a pilot survey  
Chia-Chang Huang, Shiau-Shian Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Shou-Yen Kao
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:10.   Published online May 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.10
Funded: Ministry of Education, Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan, Taipei Veteran General Hospital
  • 4,046 View
  • 272 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of virtual reality (VR) simulations combined with bedside assignments on nurses’ self-efficacy in providing pre-treatment educational services. Between March 2019 and November 2020, we conducted a study of VR educational materials that were developed to cover information about the treatment of oral cancers. The effects of the VR simulation, the thinking-path tracking map method, and bedside assignments on the nurses’ treatment decision-related knowledge were evaluated in a ward for oral cancer patients at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. The blended training model significantly increased nurses’ familiarity (P<0.01) and confidence (P<0.03) regarding their knowledge of treatments and treatment decision-related knowledge. This model also significantly increased their confidence in their skills in bedside pre-treatment education for admitted oral cancer patients (P<0.002). Oral cancer-specific VR materials enhanced the effectiveness of skills training among nurses in the oral cancer ward.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the Financial Sustainability of High-Fidelity and Virtual Reality Simulation for Nursing Education
    Michael D. Bumbach, Beth A. Culross, Santanu K. Datta
    CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing.2022; 40(9): 615.     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Innovative digital tools for new trends in teaching and assessment methods in medical and dental education  
Jung-Chul Park, Hyuk-Jae Edward Kwon, Chul Woon Chung
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:13.   Published online June 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.13
Funded: Korea Health Industry Development Institute, Ministry of Health and Welfare
  • 4,980 View
  • 385 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
With the goal of providing optimal care to patients, student-centered active learning and the development of clinical competency have become vital components of the education of future physicians capable of sustainably coping with future challenges. However, the shape of future medicine is dramatically changing based on advances in information and communication technology, and the current classroom model seems to have difficulties in fully preparing students for the future of medicine. New trends in teaching and assessment methods include computer-aided instruction, virtual patients, augmented reality, human patient simulations, and virtual reality for the assessment of students’ competency. The digital technologies introduced in medical and dental education include Google Forms to collect students’ answers, YouTube livestreaming, Google Art & Culture (an online art museum), and choose-your-own-adventure as a story-telling technique. Innovations in digital technology will lead the way toward a revolution in medical and dental education, allowing learning to be individualized, interactive, and efficient.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse, Crypto, and NFTs in Dentistry
    Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar, Aiman S. H. Abu-Fanas
    Education Sciences.2022; 12(8): 538.     CrossRef
  • An innovative approach to teaching depression and anxiety medication management: Virtual choose your own adventure, psychiatry edition
    Nina Vadiei, Jeannie K. Lee
    Mental Health Clinician.2022; 12(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study
    Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 25.     CrossRef
Research articles
The accuracy and consistency of mastery for each content domain using the Rasch and deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate diagnostic classification models: a simulation study and a real-world analysis using data from the Korean Medical Licensing Examination  
Dong Gi Seo, Jae Kum Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:15.   Published online July 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.15
Funded: Ministry of Education, National Research Foundation of Korea
  • 3,230 View
  • 276 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Diagnostic classification models (DCMs) were developed to identify the mastery or non-mastery of the attributes required for solving test items, but their application has been limited to very low-level attributes, and the accuracy and consistency of high-level attributes using DCMs have rarely been reported compared with classical test theory (CTT) and item response theory models. This paper compared the accuracy of high-level attribute mastery between deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate (DINA) and Rasch models, along with sub-scores based on CTT.
Methods
First, a simulation study explored the effects of attribute length (number of items per attribute) and the correlations among attributes with respect to the accuracy of mastery. Second, a real-data study examined model and item fit and investigated the consistency of mastery for each attribute among the 3 models using the 2017 Korean Medical Licensing Examination with 360 items.
Results
Accuracy of mastery increased with a higher number of items measuring each attribute across all conditions. The DINA model was more accurate than the CTT and Rasch models for attributes with high correlations (>0.5) and few items. In the real-data analysis, the DINA and Rasch models generally showed better item fits and appropriate model fit. The consistency of mastery between the Rasch and DINA models ranged from 0.541 to 0.633 and the correlations of person attribute scores between the Rasch and DINA models ranged from 0.579 to 0.786.
Conclusion
Although all 3 models provide a mastery decision for each examinee, the individual mastery profile using the DINA model provides more accurate decisions for attributes with high correlations than the CTT and Rasch models. The DINA model can also be directly applied to tests with complex structures, unlike the CTT and Rasch models, and it provides different diagnostic information from the CTT and Rasch models.
No difference in learning outcomes and usability between using controllers and hand tracking during a virtual reality endotracheal intubation training for medical students in Thailand  
Chaowanan Khundam, Naparat Sukkriang, Frédéric Noël
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:22.   Published online August 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.22
Funded: Walailak University
  • 3,462 View
  • 297 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We developed a virtual reality (VR) endotracheal intubation training that applied 2 interaction modalities (hand-tracking or controllersIt aimed to investigatedthe differences of usuability between using hand tracking and controllers during the VR intervention for intubation training for medical students from February 2021 to March 2021 in Thailand.
Methods
Forty-five participants were divided into 3 groups: video only, video with VR controller training, and video with VR hand tracking training. Pre-test, post-test, and practice scores were used to assess learning outcomes. The System Usability Scale (SUS) and User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire (USEQ) questionnaires were used to evaluate the differences between the VR groups. The sample comprised 45 medical students (undergraduate) who were taking part in clinical training at Walailak University in Thailand.
Results
The overall learning outcomes of both VR groups were better than those of the video group. The post-test scores (P=0.581) and practice scores (P=0.168) of both VR groups were not significantly different. Similarly, no significant between-group differences were found in the SUS scores (P=0.588) or in any aspects of the USEQ scores.
Conclusion
VR enhanced medical training. Interactions using hand tracking or controllers were not significantly different in terms of the outcomes measured in this study. The results and interviews provided a better understanding of support learning and training, which will be further improved and developed to create a self-learning VR medical training system in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Simulation in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Scoping Review of Recent Practice
    Qingming Wu, Yubin Wang, Lili Lu, Yong Chen, Hui Long, Jun Wang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea  
Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:25.   Published online September 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.25
Funded: Busan-Gyeongnam Clinical Skill Examination Consortium
  • 3,396 View
  • 242 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Setting standards is critical in health professions. However, appropriate standard setting methods do not always apply to the set cut score in performance assessment. The aim of this study was to compare the cut score when the standard setting is changed from the norm-referenced method to the borderline group method (BGM) and borderline regression method (BRM) in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in medical school.
Methods
This was an explorative study to model the implementation of the BGM and BRM. A total of 107 fourth-year medical students attended the OSCE at 7 stations for encountering standardized patients (SPs) and at 1 station for performing skills on a manikin on July 15th, 2021. Thirty-two physician examiners evaluated the performance by completing a checklist and global rating scales.
Results
The cut score of the norm-referenced method was lower than that of the BGM (P<0.01) and BRM (P<0.02). There was no significant difference in the cut score between the BGM and BRM (P=0.40). The station with the highest standard deviation and the highest proportion of the borderline group showed the largest cut score difference in standard setting methods.
Conclusion
Prefixed cut scores by the norm-referenced method without considering station contents or examinee performance can vary due to station difficulty and content, affecting the appropriateness of standard setting decisions. If there is an adequate consensus on the criteria for the borderline group, standard setting with the BRM could be applied as a practical and defensible method to determine the cut score for OSCE.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Possibility of using the yes/no Angoff method as a substitute for the percent Angoff method for estimating the cutoff score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination: a simulation study
    Janghee Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 23.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
Definition of character for medical education based on expert opinions in Korea  
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:26.   Published online September 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.26
Funded: Ministry of Education, National Research Foundation of Korea
  • 3,199 View
  • 213 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This follow-up study focused on 3 overarching questions: what keywords can be extracted from experts’ definitions of character?; what is the operational definition of character for medical students?; and what possible solutions can be suggested to address the issues of character education that were identified in the previous study?
Methods
Sixty-three medical education experts recruited through expert sampling and 19 non-medical education experts recruited through snowball sampling answered a questionnaire that addressed the 3 major questions of the study. The responses were analyzed for descriptive statistics with supplementary keyword extraction tools, including the Cortical and Monkey keyword extractors.
Results
A total of 93 definitional statements were counted, and 138 keyword terms were extracted. The top 5 keyword terms mentioned by the medical education experts were “patient”, “empathy”, “qualities”, “attitude”, and “ability”. These keyword terms were quite different from those mentioned by the non-medical education experts. Based on the extracted keywords, an operational definition of character education by the medical education expert group was presented as follows: the basic qualities and ability to empathize with patients affected by illness based on respect for patients and others. Various methods were proposed to solve the issue of character education, and many of them pointed to curriculum development, such as improvements in teaching and learning methods and evaluation methods, including role modeling.
Conclusion
A clear statement of the concept of character education is the start to resolve issues of character education. Character education improvements will be possible at the institutional level according to the above results.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical students’ self-evaluation of character, and method of character education
    Yera Hur, Sanghee Yeo, Keumho Lee
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of mentoring, supervision, coaching, teaching and instruction on professional identity formation: a systematic scoping review
    Rachelle Qi En Toh, Kai Kee Koh, Jun Kiat Lua, Ruth Si Man Wong, Elaine Li Ying Quah, Aiswarya Panda, Chong Yao Ho, Nicole-Ann Lim, Yun Ting Ong, Keith Zi Yuan Chua, Victoria Wen Wei Ng, Sabine Lauren Chyi Hui Wong, Luke Yu Xuan Yeo, Sin Yee See, Jolene J
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Effects of virtual reality training on decreasing the rates of needlestick or sharp injury in new-coming medical and nursing interns in Taiwan  
Szu-Hsien Wu, Chia-Chang Huang, Shiau-Shian Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Chih-Wei Liu, Boaz Shulruf, Chen-Huan Chen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:1.   Published online January 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.1
Funded: Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan Association of Medical Education
  • 8,924 View
  • 347 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Senior nursing and medical interns’ lack of familiarity and confidence with respect to practicing universal precaution for the prevention of occupational needlestick or sharp injuries may harm themselves. Trainees’ self-reported needlestick or sharp injury rate was known to be especially high during the first 2 months of internship in Taiwan. This prospective cohort study aimed to assess the effect of newly developed virtual reality (VR) game, which uses Gagne’s learning model to improve universal precaution for needlestick or sharp injury prevention and decrease the rates of needle stick or sharp injuries in new-coming medical and nursing interns in Taiwan.
Methods
From 2017 to 2019, the VR system was developed and applied in training of 59 new-coming nursing and 50 medical interns. Occupational needlestick or sharp injury prevention was sought to be achieved through a game of right and wrong choices for safe or unsafe universal precaution behaviors.
Results
In comparison with medical interns, a higher proportion of nursing interns had past experiences of deep occupational needlestick or sharp injury. Before VR training, the familiarity and confidence for needlestick or sharp injury prevention were higher among nursing interns than medical interns. Trainees with past experiences of deep needlestick or sharp injury exhibited better performance on the accuracy rate and time needed to complete 20 decisions than those without past experiences in VR practice. All trainees showed an improved performance after VR training. A high proportion of trainees reported that the VR-based training significantly decreased their anxiety about needlestick or sharp injury prevention.
Conclusion
This self-developed VR game system using Gagne’s flow improved universal precaution for needlestick or sharp injury prevention and reduced the needlestick or sharp injury rates in the first 2 months of nursing and medical internship.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How, for Whom, and in Which Contexts or Conditions Augmented and Virtual Reality Training Works in Upskilling Health Care Workers: Realist Synthesis
    Norina Gasteiger, Sabine N van der Veer, Paul Wilson, Dawn Dowding
    JMIR Serious Games.2022; 10(1): e31644.     CrossRef
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Literature Review of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality Game Applications in Healthcare
    Yu Fu, Yan Hu, Veronica Sundstedt
    ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare.2022; 3(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Immersive Virtual Reality in Nursing Education
    Jeeyae Choi, C Elise Thompson, Jeungok Choi, Colette B. Waddill, Soyoung Choi
    Nurse Educator.2022; 47(3): E57.     CrossRef
  • Systematic Bibliometric Analysis of Research Hotspots and Trends on the Application of Virtual Reality in Nursing
    Junqiang Zhao, Yi Lu, Fujun Zhou, Ruping Mao, Fangqin Fei
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and Pilot Testing of a Non-stress Test Virtual Reality Simulator
    Li-Fen Chao, Tsuey-Yuan Huang, Debra K. Moser, Fen-Fang Chung, Ying-Tung Lau, Xaviera Xiao
    CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing.2022; 40(6): 357.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of a Child Model on Breath-Sounds Examination Skills and Satisfaction on Nursing Students
    Silpthai Thamruangrit, Sermsri Santati, Jumpee Granger, Dongruethai Buadong, Jatuporn Thongsri
    Healthcare.2022; 10(7): 1165.     CrossRef
  • Theories informing technology enhanced learning in nursing and midwifery education: A systematic review and typological classification
    Siobhan O'Connor, Stephanie Kennedy, Yajing Wang, Amna Ali, Samantha Cooke, Richard G. Booth
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 118: 105518.     CrossRef
  • Tendência temporal dos acidentes por exposição percutânea em um hospital público no Brasil, 2007-2019
    Renan Sallazar Ferreira Pereira, Cecília Angelita dos Santos, Adriano Marçal Pimenta
    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Temporal trend of accidents due to percutaneous exposure in a public hospital in Brazil, 2007-2019
    Renan Sallazar Ferreira Pereira, Cecília Angelita dos Santos, Adriano Marçal Pimenta
    Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Review of literature: Knowledge and practice of standard precautions by nursing student and teaching techniques used in training
    Stephanie Bouget Mohammedi, Caroline Landelle
    American Journal of Infection Control.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mild simulator sickness can alter heart rate variability, mental workload, and learning outcomes in a 360° virtual reality application for medical education: a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial
    Li-Jen Hsin, Yi-Ping Chao, Hai-Hua Chuang, Terry B. J. Kuo, Cheryl C. H. Yang, Chung-Guei Huang, Chung-Jan Kang, Wan-Ni Lin, Tuan-Jen Fang, Hsueh-Yu Li, Li-Ang Lee
    Virtual Reality.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Influence of Technology in Supporting Quality and Safety in Nursing Education
    Gerry Altmiller, Loraine Hopkins Pepe
    Nursing Clinics of North America.2022; 57(4): 551.     CrossRef
  • What are the key factors influencing nursing students’ Willingness to serve older adults? An Educational Technology Perspective (Preprint)
    Pei-Lun Hsieh, Tien-Chi Huang
    JMIR Serious Games.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Virtual reality simulations in nurse education: A systematic mapping review
    Christian Plotzky, Ulrike Lindwedel, Michaela Sorber, Barbara Loessl, Peter König, Christophe Kunze, Christiane Kugler, Michael Meng
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 101: 104868.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Reality in Healthcare Skills Training: The Effects of Presence on Acceptance and Increase of Knowledge
    Christian Plotzky, Ulrike Lindwedel, Alexander Bejan, Peter König, Christophe Kunze
    i-com.2021; 20(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of immersive virtual reality for industrial skills training
    Unnikrishnan Radhakrishnan, Konstantinos Koumaditis, Francesco Chinello
    Behaviour & Information Technology.2021; 40(12): 1310.     CrossRef
  • No difference in learning outcomes and usability between using controllers and hand tracking during a virtual reality endotracheal intubation training for medical students in Thailand
    Chaowanan Khundam, Naparat Sukkriang, Frédéric Noël
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 22.     CrossRef
  • How to train health personnel to protect themselves from SARS-CoV-2 (novel coronavirus) infection when caring for a patient or suspected case
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 10.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude and behavior towards COVID-19 among the Turkish healthcare workers
    Yasin Uzuntarla, Sumeyra Ceyhan
    Journal of Clinical Medicine of Kazakhstan.2020; 6(60): 93.     CrossRef
Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:3.   Published online January 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.3
Funded: National Agency for Strategic Research in Medical Education
  • 6,739 View
  • 221 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine consists of the expression of medical experiences and the reflection on narratives to foster empathic communication with patients. Reflecting on narratives increases self-awareness and recognition of the feelings of the narrator or the story’s main character, which in turn affects the audience. This study was conducted to examine the impact of a narrative medicine program on the reflective capacity and empathy of medical students.
Methods
A quasi-experimental study was performed during the 2018–2019 academic year at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran involving 135 medical interns in 2 groups (control [n=66] and experimental [n=69]). Interns in the experimental group took part in seven 2-hour reflective practice sessions, while those in the control group underwent no educational intervention. Pre-test and post-test assessments were conducted for both groups using 2 valid and reliable tools for the assessment of reflective capacity and empathy. Mean reflection and empathy scores were compared within groups (between pre- and post-test values) and between groups (using the paired-t test and the t-test; P≤0.05).
Results
The mean reflection and empathy scores of the experimental group significantly increased from pre-test to post-test, but those of the control group did not. Moreover, the mean post-test scores were significantly different between the 2 groups (P<0.001).
Conclusion
Narrative medicine is an effective teaching method that can improve reflective capacity and empathy, thereby ultimately promoting professionalism as a core competency in medicine. Consideration of learning conditions and interdisciplinary teaching are necessary for implementing a narrative medicine program.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Empathy, personality traits, and emotional management in 2nd and 4th-year dentistry students: a single-center study
    Christian Lermen, Willi Wetzel, Vanessa Britz, Jasmina Sterz, Wolf O Bechstein, Teresa Schreckenbach
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Challenges of Implementing the First Narrative Medicine Course for Teaching Professionalism in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Historical empathy and medicine: Pathography and empathy in Sophocles’ Philoctetes
    Vassiliki Kampourelli
    Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.2022; 25(3): 561.     CrossRef
  • The effects of narrative pedagogy on increasing nursing students' willingness to practice older people care: A mixed-methods research
    Pei-Ti Hsu, Jeu-Jung Chen, Ya-Fang Ho
    Nurse Education in Practice.2022; 62: 103356.     CrossRef
  • Finding the Story in Medicine
    Elizabeth Fenstermacher, Regina M. Longley, Hermioni L. Amonoo
    Psychiatric Clinics of North America.2021; 44(2): 263.     CrossRef
  • How does narrative medicine impact medical trainees’ learning of professionalism? A qualitative study
    Chien-Da Huang, Chang-Chyi Jenq, Kuo-Chen Liao, Shu-Chung Lii, Chi-Hsien Huang, Tsai-Yu Wang
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Review of Educational Interventions and Their Impact on Empathy and Compassion of Undergraduate Medical Students
    Prianna Menezes, Salman Y. Guraya, Shaista Salman Guraya
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Using the Angoff method to set a standard on mock exams for the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination  
Mi Kyoung Yim, Sujin Shin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:14.   Published online April 22, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.14
Funded: Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute
  • 5,821 View
  • 169 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study explored the possibility of using the Angoff method, in which panel experts determine the cut score of an exam, for the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination (KNLE). Two mock exams for the KNLE were analyzed. The Angoff standard setting procedure was conducted and the results were analyzed. We also aimed to examine the procedural validity of applying the Angoff method in this context.
Methods
For both mock exams, we set a pass-fail cut score using the Angoff method. The standard setting panel consisted of 16 nursing professors. After the Angoff procedure, the procedural validity of establishing the standard was evaluated by investigating the responses of the standard setters.
Results
The descriptions of the minimally competent person for the KNLE were presented at the levels of general and subject performance. The cut scores of first and second mock exams were 74.4 and 76.8, respectively. These were higher than the traditional cut score (60% of the total score of the KNLE). The panel survey showed very positive responses, with scores higher than 4 out of 5 points on a Likert scale.
Conclusion
The scores calculated for both mock tests were similar, and were much higher than the existing cut scores. In the second simulation, the standard deviation of the Angoff rating was lower than in the first simulation. According to the survey results, procedural validity was acceptable, as shown by a high level of confidence. The results show that determining cut scores by an expert panel is an applicable method.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Possibility of using the yes/no Angoff method as a substitute for the percent Angoff method for estimating the cutoff score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination: a simulation study
    Janghee Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 23.     CrossRef
  • Development of examination objectives based on nursing competency for the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination: a validity study
    Sujin Shin, Gwang Suk Kim, Jun-Ah Song, Inyoung Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 19.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
Review
Nurse educators’ experiences with student incivility: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies  
Eun-Jun Park, Hyunwook Kang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:23.   Published online August 11, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.23
Funded: Konkuk University
  • 5,605 View
  • 191 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to synthesize the best available qualitative research evidence on nurse educators’ experiences with student incivility in undergraduate nursing classrooms. A meta-synthesis of qualitative evidence using thematic synthesis was conducted. A systematic search was performed of 12 databases for relevant literature published by March 31, 2019. Two reviewers independently conducted critical quality appraisals using the checklist for qualitative research developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Eleven studies that met the inclusion criteria were selected for review. From the pooled study findings, 26 descriptive themes were generated and categorized into the following 5 analytical themes: (1) factors contributing to student incivility, (2) management of student incivility, (3) impact: professional and personal damage, (4) impact: professional growth, and (5) initiatives for the future. Many nurse educators became confident in their role of providing accountability as both educators and gatekeepers and experienced professional growth. However, others experienced damage to their personal and professional life and lost their motivation to teach. Nurse educators recommended the following strategies for preventing or better managing student incivility: institutional efforts by the university, unified approaches for student incivility within a nursing program, a faculty-to-faculty network for mentoring, and better teaching and learning strategies for individual educators. These strategies would help all nurse educators experience professional growth by successfully preventing and managing student incivility.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty incivility in nursing classrooms: A meta-aggregation of qualitative studies
    Eun-Jun Park, Hyunwook Kang
    Nurse Education in Practice.2021; 52: 103002.     CrossRef
  • Can nursing educators learn to trust the world’s most trusted profession?
    Philip Darbyshire, David R. Thompson
    Nursing Inquiry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Opinion
Importance and utilization frequency of essential competencies of Korean physical therapists
Junghyun Choi, Taeyoung Oh, Jae Seop Oh, Wootaek Lim, Jeonhyeong Lee, Seul Ki Han, Yun Sang Park, Hyeok Gyu Kwon, Chang Sik Ahn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:24.   Published online September 1, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.24
Funded: Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Insititute
  • 4,184 View
  • 134 Download
PDFSupplementary Material

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions