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Volume 13; 2016
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Editorials
What is interesting in the issue 2016 of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions?
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:46.   Published online December 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.46
  • 23,480 View
  • 191 Download
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An eventful year for the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:45.   Published online December 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.45
  • 24,369 View
  • 190 Download
  • 4 Citations
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Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions will be accepted for inclusion in Scopus
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 2.     CrossRef
  • How to PrepareEndocrinology and Metabolismfor Reapplication to MEDLINE
    Sun Huh
    Endocrinology and Metabolism.2017; 32(1): 58.     CrossRef
  • How to successfully list a journal in the Social Science Citation Index or Science Citation Index Expanded
    Sun Huh
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2017; 29(4): 221.     CrossRef
  • Establishment of an open data policy for Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, appreciation for invited reviewers, and acknowledgement of volunteers who made audio recordings
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 37.     CrossRef
Research Articles
A cost-effectiveness analysis of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing for simulated crises in perioperative medicine in Canada  
Wanrudee Isaranuwatchai, Fahad Alam, Jeffrey Hoch, Sylvain Boet
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:44.   Published online December 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.44
  • 25,956 View
  • 288 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
High-fidelity simulation training is effective for learning crisis resource management (CRM) skills, but cost is a major barrier to implementing high-fidelity simulation training into the curriculum. The aim of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of self-debriefing and traditional instructor debriefing in CRM training programs and to calculate the minimum willingness-to-pay (WTP) value when one debriefing type becomes more cost-effective than the other. Methods: This study used previous data from a randomized controlled trial involving 50 anesthesiology residents in Canada. Each participant managed a pretest crisis scenario. Participants who were randomized to self-debrief used the video of their pretest scenario with no instructor present during their debriefing. Participants from the control group were debriefed by a trained instructor using the video of their pretest scenario. Participants individually managed a post-test simulated crisis scenario. We compared the cost and effectiveness of self-debriefing versus instructor debriefing using net benefit regression. The cost-effectiveness estimate was reported as the incremental net benefit and the uncertainty was presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Results: Self-debriefing costs less than instructor debriefing. As the WTP increased, the probability that self-debriefing would be cost-effective decreased. With a WTP ≤Can$200, the self-debriefing program was cost-effective. However, when effectiveness was priced higher than cost-savings and with a WTP >Can$300, instructor debriefing was the preferred alternative. Conclusion: With a lower WTP (≤Can$200), self-debriefing was cost-effective in CRM simulation training when compared to instructor debriefing. This study provides evidence regarding cost-effectiveness that will inform decision-makers and clinical educators in their decision-making process, and may help to optimize resource allocation in education.

Citations

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    Eun-Ho Ha, Eun Ju Lim
    Clinical Simulation in Nursing.2018; 18: 38.     CrossRef
  • Instructor-led vs. peer-led debriefing in preoperative care simulation using standardized patients
    Sang Suk Kim, Jennie C. De Gagne
    Nurse Education Today.2018; 71: 34.     CrossRef
  • What is interesting in the issue 2016 of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions?
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 46.     CrossRef
Nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the bachelor’s programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Pakistan  
Gideon Victor, Muhammad Ishtiaq, Subia Parveen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:43.   Published online December 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.43
  • 26,295 View
  • 343 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The objective of this study was to evaluate nursing students’ perceptions of their educational environment in a private college. Perceptions were compared between genders and 2 bachelor’s programs. Methods: A total of 219 students participated in this study, drawn from the Generic Bachelor of Science in Nursing (GBSN) and the Post-Registered Nurse Bachelor of Science in Nursing (PRBSN) programs of the Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure was utilized for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate total scores, as well as means and standard deviations, and the t-test was applied for comparisons according to program and gender. Results: The overall total mean score (119 of 200) is suggestive of more positive than negative perceptions of the educational environment. The mean score of 13 of 28 on the social self-perception subscale suggests that the social environment was felt to be ‘not a nice place.’ The t-test revealed more positive perceptions among students enrolled in the PRBSN program (P<0.0001) than among those enrolled in the GBSN program and more positive perceptions among female students than among male students (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Commonalities and differences were found in the perceptions of the nursing students. Both positive and negative perceptions were reported; the overall sense of a positive environment was present, but the social component requires immediate attention, along with other unsatisfactory components. Establishing a supportive environment conducive to competence-based learning would play an important role in bringing desirable changes to the educational environment.

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    Khouloud Boukhris, Chekib Zedini, Mariem El Ghardallou
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  • Evaluation of an undergraduate occupational health program in Iran based on alumni perceptions: a structural equation model
    Semira Mehralizadeh, Alireza Dehdashti, Masoud Motalebi Kashani
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 16.     CrossRef
Australian medical students have fewer opportunities to do physical examination of peers of the opposite gender  
Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:42.   Published online November 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.42
  • 24,480 View
  • 206 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Peer physical examination (PPE), by which junior medical students learn physical examination skills before practicing on patients, is a widely implemented and accepted part of medical curricula. However, the ethical implications of PPE have been debated, since issues including student gender impact on its acceptability. Research has previously demonstrated the phenomenon of ‘attitude-behavior inconsistency’ showing that students’ predictions about their participation in PPE differ from what they actually do in practice. This study asks whether gender and student self-ratings of outlook affect engagement in PPE. Methods: This study gathered data from students who had completed PPE with the objective of determining what factors have the greatest impact on the actual practice of PPE by students. Data were used to derive the number of opportunities students had to examine a peer, for various body parts. Respondent gender and self-ratings of outlook were recorded. Results: Responses from 130 students were analysed: 74 female (57%) and 56 male (43%). Students have fewer opportunities to examine peers of the opposite gender; this is statistically significant for all body parts when male students examine female peers. Conclusion: Gender is the factor of overriding importance on whether these peer interactions actually occur, such that students have fewer opportunities to examine peers of the opposite gender, particularly male students examining female peers. Student outlook has little impact. We speculate that the more acceptable PPE is to participants, paradoxically, the more complicated these interactions become, possibly with implications for future practice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia
    Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 3.     CrossRef
  • L’enseignement par discipline de la sémiologie en deuxième année de médecine améliore l’acquisition des compétences. Exemple de la sémiologie neurologique
    G. Turc, B. Terrier, A.-S. Bats, C. Ngo, B. Ranque, D. Calvet
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  • The sights and insights of examiners in objective structured clinical examinations
    Lauren Chong, Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Barbara-Ann Adelstein, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 34.     CrossRef
Brief Report
The effect of the SNAPPS (summarize, narrow, analyze, probe, plan, and select) method versus teacher-centered education on the clinical gynecology skills of midwifery students in Iran  
Hamideh Barangard, Poorandokht Afshari, Parvin Abedi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:41.   Published online November 15, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.41
  • 26,855 View
  • 268 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to determine the effect of the SNAPPS (summarize, narrow, analyze, probe, plan, and select) method versus teacher-centered education on the clinical skills of midwifery students in Iran. In this clinical trial, 36 midwifery students in their 4th year of education in 2015 were enrolled and divided into 6 groups, 3 groups for teacher-centered education and 3 groups for the SNAPPS method, with each group spending 10 days in the outpatient gynecology clinic. A questionnaire and a checklist were used to gather data. An independent t-test and chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Ability to gain the trust of the patient, verbal and nonverbal communication skills, history taking, preparation of the patient for gynecological examination, and diagnosis and treatment of common diseases were significantly better in the SNAPPS group compared to the teacher-centered education group (P<0.05). The SNAPPS education method can significantly improve the clinical skills of midwifery students in gynecology, in particular history taking, differential diagnosis, and treatment of common diseases.

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  • Effectiveness of a SNAPPS in psychiatric residents assessed using objective structured teaching encounters: a case-control study
    Lorena Pinho Feijó, Guilherme Abreu Pereira, Vitor Maia Teles Ruffini, Fernando Salvetti Valente, Renato Antunes dos Santos, Saadallah Azor Fakhouri Filho, Maria do Patrocínio Tenório Nunes, Kristopherson Lustosa Augusto
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Research Article
Does emotional intelligence influence success during medical school admissions and program matriculation?: a systematic review  
Christian Jaeger Cook, Chad E. Cook, Tiffany N. Hilton
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:40.   Published online November 8, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.40
  • 30,817 View
  • 357 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
It aimed at determining whether emotional intelligence is a predictor for success in a medical school program and whether the emotional intelligence construct correlated with other markers for admission into medical school. Methods: Three databases (PubMed, CINAHL, and ERIC) were searched up to and including July 2016, using relevant terms. Studies written in English were selected if they included emotional intelligence as a predictor for success in medical school, markers of success such as examination scores and grade point average and association with success defined through traditional medical school admission criteria and failures, and details about the sample. Data extraction included the study authors and year, population description, emotional intelligence I tool, outcome variables, and results. Associations between emotional intelligence scores and reported data were extracted and recorded. Results: Six manuscripts were included. Overall, study quality was high. Four of the manuscripts examined emotional intelligence as a predictor for success while in medical school. Three of these four studies supported a weak positive relationship between emotional intelligence scores and success during matriculation. Two of manuscripts examined the relationship of emotional intelligence to medical school admissions. There were no significant relevant correlations between emotional intelligence and medical school admission selection. Conclusion: Emotional intelligence was correlated with some, but not all, measures of success during medical school matriculation and none of the measures associated with medical school admissions. Variability in success measures across studies likely explains the variable findings.

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    Sun Yeob Choi
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  • What is interesting in the issue 2016 of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions?
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Brief Report
Impact of individualized learning plans on United States senior medical students advanced clinical rotations  
Amalia Guardiola, Michelle S. Barratt, Emma A. Omoruyi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:39.   Published online November 7, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.39
  • 24,438 View
  • 194 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The individualized learning plan (ILP) is a tool that promotes self-directed learning. The aim of this pilot study was to look at the perception of the ILPs in United States senior medical school students as a way to improve their learning experience during their advanced practice clerkship. We conducted a survey of graduating medical students that contained both quantitative and open-ended questions regarding the students’ experiences with the ILP during their advanced practice clerkship from July 2014 to March 2016. We systematically identified and compiled themes among the qualitative responses. Responses from 294 out of 460 subjects were included for analysis (63.9%). Ninety students (30.6%) reported that the ILP was definitely reviewed at the midpoint and 88 (29.9%) at the final evaluation. One hundred sixty one students (54.8%) felt the ILP provided a framework for learning. One hundred sixty one students (61.6%) felt it was a useful tool in helping open a discussion between the student and faculty. The qualitative data was grouped by areas most mentioned and these areas of concern centered on lack of faculty knowledge about ILP, time to complete ILP, and uncertainty of appropriate goal setting. The majority of students perceive the ILP to be helpful. Our results suggest that active intervention is needed by dedicated and trained faculty to improve ILP utilization. It is recommended that faculty gives students examples of learning goals to create their own learning framework and encourages them to discuss and review the ILP.

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    Deepa Shah, Carl E. Haisch, Seth L. Noland
    Journal of Surgical Education.2018; 75(2): 304.     CrossRef
  • Unique Terms or Are We Splitting Hairs? Clarification of Self-directed Versus Self-regulated Learning and Related Terms
    Polly R. Husmann, Leslie A. Hoffman, Audra F. Schaefer
    Medical Science Educator.2018; 28(4): 777.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Learning styles, academic achievement, and mental health problems among medical students in Thailand  
Salilthip Paiboonsithiwong, Natchaya Kunanitthaworn, Natchaphon Songtrijuck, Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:38.   Published online October 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.38
  • 30,661 View
  • 380 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of various learning styles among medical students and their correlations with academic achievement and mental health problems in these students. Methods: This study was conducted among 140 first-year medical students of Chiang Mai University, Thailand in 2014. The participants completed the visual-aural-read/write-kinesthetic (VARK) questionnaire, the results of which can be categorized into 4 modes, corresponding to how many of the 4 types are preferred by a respondent. The 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and the 21-item Outcome Inventory (OI-21) were also used. The participants’ demographic data, grade point average (GPA), and scores of all measurements are presented using simple statistics. Correlation and regression analysis were employed to analyze differences in the scores and to determine the associations among them. Results: Sixty percent of the participants were female. The mean age was 18.86±0.74 years old. Quadmodal was found to be the most preferred VARK mode (43.6%). Unimodal, bimodal, and trimodal modes were preferred by 35%, 12.9%, and 18.6% of the participants, respectively. Among the strong unimodal learners, visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic preferences were reported by 4.3%, 7.1%, 11.4%, and 12.1% of participants, respectively. No difference was observed in the PSS-10, OI-anxiety, OI-depression, and OI-somatization scores according to the VARK modes, although a significant effect was found for OI-interpersonal (F=2.788, P=0.043). Moreover, neither VARK modes nor VARK types were correlated with GPA. Conclusion: The most preferred VARK learning style among medical students was quadmodal. Learning styles were not associated with GPA or mental health problems, except for interpersonal problems.

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  • The association between learning styles and academic achievement among medical students
    Abdulaziz Alturki, Eyad Alsuhaibani, Waleed Mufarrih, Hessah Alsayahi, Roba Altameem, Nouf Almansour, Yara Alessa, Arwa Abdulsalam, Ibrahim Alodhaibi, Bandar Alzuair, Reham Alturki
    International Journal of Medicine in Developing Countries.2021; : 751.     CrossRef
  • Instruments to evaluate undergraduate healthcare student learning styles globally: A scoping review
    Daniel Gonçalves Campos, Juliany Lino Gomes Silva, Melissa Jarvill, Roberta Cunha M. Rodrigues, Ana Railka de Souza Oliveira Kumakura, Daniel Gonçalves Campos
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    Sudarat PAYAPROM, Yupares PAYAPROM
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    Lindsey Childs-Kean, Mary Edwards, Mary Douglass Smith
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  • Preferred teaching styles of medical faculty: an international multi-center study
    Nihar Ranjan Dash, Salman Yousuf Guraya, Mohammad Tahseen Al Bataineh, Mohamed Elhassan Abdalla, Muhamad Saiful Bahri Yusoff, Mona Faisal Al-Qahtani, Walther N. K. A. van Mook, Muhammad Saeed Shafi, Hamdi Hameed Almaramhy, Wail Nuri Osman Mukhtar
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    Abdolreza Gilavand
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Does MMPI assessed at medical school admission predict psychological problems in later years?
    Kulvadee Thongpibul, Pairada Varnado, Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran, Pimolpun Kuntawong, Danny Wedding
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    A. Benditz, L. Pulido, T. Renkawitz, T. Schwarz, J. Grifka, M. Weber
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  • DİŞ HEKİMLİĞİ FAKÜLTESİ ÖĞRENCİLERİNİN ÖĞRENME STİLLERİNİN İKİ FARKLI YÖNTEMLE ANALİZİ
    Ayşe KOÇAK BÜYÜKDERE
    Atatürk Üniversitesi Diş Hekimliği Fakültesi Dergisi.2018; : 371.     CrossRef
Continuing education requirements among State Occupational Therapy Regulatory Boards in the United States of America  
Savannah R. Hall, Kristen A. Crifasi, Christina M. Marinelli, Hon K. Yuen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:37.   Published online October 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.37
  • 27,419 View
  • 213 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the contents of each state’s occupational therapy (OT) regulatory board requirements regarding licensees’ acquisition of continuing education units in the United States of America. Methods: Data related to continuing education requirements from each OT regulatory board of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States were reviewed and categorized by two reviewers. Analysis was conducted based on the categorization of the continuing education requirements and activities required, allowed, and not allowed/not mentioned for continuing education units. Results: Findings revealed non-uniformity and inconsistency of continuing education requirements for licensure renewal between OT regulatory boards and was coupled with lack of specific criteria for various continuing education activities. Continuing education requirements were not tailored to meet the needs of individual licensee’s current and anticipated professional role and job responsibilities, with a negative bias towards presentation and publication allowed for continuing education units. Few boards mandated continuing education topics on ethics related to OT practice within each renewal cycle. Conclusion: OT regulatory boards should move towards unifying the reporting format of continuing education requirements across all states to reduce ambiguity and to ensure licensees are equipped to provide ethical and competent practice. Efforts could be made to enact continuing education requirements specific to the primary role of a particular licensee. Finally, assigning the amount of continuing education credits to be awarded for different activities should be based on research evidence rather than arbitrary determination.

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  • Type of Findings Generated by the Occupational Therapy Workforce Research Worldwide: Scoping Review and Content Analysis
    Tiago S. Jesus, Karthik Mani, Claudia von Zweck, Sureshkumar Kamalakannan, Sutanuka Bhattacharjya, Ritchard Ledgerd
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(9): 5307.     CrossRef
  • Limitations and Recommendations for Advancing the Occupational Therapy Workforce Research Worldwide: Scoping Review and Content Analysis of the Literature
    Tiago S. Jesus, Karthik Mani, Ritchard Ledgerd, Sureshkumar Kamalakannan, Sutanuka Bhattacharjya, Claudia von Zweck
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(12): 7327.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
Text messaging versus email for emergency medicine residents’ knowledge retention: a pilot comparison in the United States  
Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont, Miriam Kulkarni, Pedro Tomas-Domingo, Craig Anderson, Denise McCormack, Khoa Tu, Bharath Chakravarthy, Shahram Lotfipour
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:36.   Published online October 26, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.36
  • 39,927 View
  • 207 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
We evaluated the effectiveness of text messaging versus email, as a delivery method to enhance knowledge retention of emergency medicine (EM) content in EM residents. We performed a multi-centered, prospective, randomized study consisting of postgraduate year (PGY) 1 to PGY 3 & 4 residents in three United States EM residency programs in 2014. Fifty eight residents were randomized into one delivery group: text message or email. Participants completed a 40 question pre- and post-intervention exam. Primary outcomes were the means of pre- and post-intervention exam score differences. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and multiple linear regressions. No significant difference was found between the primary outcomes of the two groups (P=0.51). PGY 2 status had a significant negative effect (P=0.01) on predicted exam score difference. Neither delivery method enhanced resident knowledge retention. Further research on implementation of mobile technology in residency education is required.

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    Jacob E. Kuperstock, Michal Horný, Michael P. Platt
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    Blanka Klímová
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Effects of an integrated geriatric group balance class within an entry-level Doctorate of Physical Therapy program on students’ perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education in the United States  
Jennifer C. Reneker, Kyra Weems, Vincent Scaia
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:35.   Published online October 25, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.35
  • 25,872 View
  • 376 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was aimed at determining the effect of an integrated group balance class for community-dwelling older adults within entry-level physical therapist coursework on student perceptions of geriatric physical therapy and geriatric physical therapy education. Twenty-nine Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students, 21–33 years old, in their second year of coursework in 2012, participated in an integrated clinical experience with exposure to geriatric patients at an outpatient facility at the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Akron, Ohio, USA. Student perceptions were collected before and after participation in the 8-week balance class. The Wilcoxon sign-ranked test was used to identify differences in perceptions after participation in the group balance class. Cohen’s d-values were calculated to measure the size of the pre-participation to post-participation effect for each measure. At the conclusion of the group class, the DPT students demonstrated an increase in positive perceptions of geriatric physical therapy in 8 measures, with small effect sizes (d=0.15–0.30). Two perceptions of geriatric physical therapy demonstrated a significant positive increase (P<0.05) with moderate effect sizes (d=0.47 and d=0.50). The students’ perceptions of geriatric education in the curriculum demonstrated a large positive effect for quality (d=1.68) and enjoyment (d=1.96). Positive changes were found in most of the perceptions of geriatrics and geriatric education after participation, suggesting that integrated clinical experiences with geriatric patients are an effective way to positively influence perceptions of physical therapist practice with older adults.

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    Chia-Wei Li, Ching-Ju Chiu
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    Yvonne M. Colgrove, Jason Rucker
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  • The Integrated Clinical Education Strategic Initiatives Project—Development of Parameters to Guide Harmonization in Clinical Education: A Scoping Review
    Christine McCallum, Jamie Bayliss, Elaine Becker, Kim Nixon-Cave, Yvonne Colgrove, Janna Kucharski-Howard, Debra Stern, Kimeran Evans, Valerie Strunk, Ellen Wetherbee, Byron Russell, Tara Legar
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Research Articles
Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review  
Konstantinos Kyriakoulis, Athina Patelarou, Aggelos Laliotis, Andrew C Wan, Michail Matalliotakis, Chrysoula Tsiou, Evridiki Patelarou
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:34.   Published online September 22, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.34
  • 59,126 View
  • 1,137 Download
  • 57 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. Methods: The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Results: Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Conclusion: Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying form some hours to even months was not related to the students’ EBP competence.

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Medical laboratory science and nursing students’ perception of the academic learning environment at a Philippine university using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure  
Jonathan M. Barcelo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:33.   Published online September 22, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.33
  • 32,323 View
  • 333 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to compare the perception of the academic learning environment between medical laboratory science students and nursing students at Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Philippines. Methods: A cross-sectional survey research design was used to measure the perceptions of the participants. A total of 341 students from the Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Natural Sciences, and the School of Nursing answered the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) instrument from April to May 2016. Responses were compared according to course of study, gender, and year level. Results: The total mean DREEM scores of the medical laboratory science students and nursing students did not differ significantly when grouped according to course of study, gender, or year level. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domains ‘perception of learning’ and ‘perception of teaching.’ Male medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain ‘perception of learning’ among second year students. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain ‘perception of learning.’ Nursing students identified 7 problem areas, most of which were related to their instructors. Conclusion: Medical laboratory science and nursing students viewed their academic learning environment as ‘more positive than negative.’ However, the relationship of the nursing instructors to their students needs improvement.

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    Khouloud Boukhris, Chekib Zedini, Mariem El Ghardallou
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 111: 105316.     CrossRef
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    Syed Sameer Aga, Muhammad Anwar Khan, Mansour Al Qurashi, Bader Khawaji, Mubarak Al-Mansour, Syed Waqas Shah, Amir Abushouk, Hassan Abdullah Alabdali, Ahmed Sultan Alharbi, Mishal Essam Hawsawi, Osama Ali Alzharani, Ehsan Namaziandost
    Education Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of learning environment among Nursing undergraduates in state universities, Sri Lanka
    Patalee Jayaweera, Abisheka Thilakarathne, Madushanka Ratnayaka, Tharangi Shashikala, Rushani Arachchige, Lahiru Sandaruwan Galgamuwa, Nimantha Karunathilaka, Thamara Amarasekara
    BMC Nursing.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    María-José Castro, María López, María-José Cao, Mercedes Fernández-Castro, Sara García, Manuel Frutos, José-María Jiménez, Jamie L. Jensen
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(7): e0220388.     CrossRef
  • Improving students’ learning environment by DREEM: an educational experiment in an Iranian medical sciences university (2011–2016)
    Hamid Bakhshialiabad, Golnaz Bakhshi, Zahra Hashemi, Amirhosein Bakhshi, Faroukh Abazari
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
The student experience of applied equivalence-based instruction for neuroanatomy teaching  
W. James Greville, Simon Dymond, Philip M. Newton
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:32.   Published online September 13, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.32
Correction in: J Educ Eval Health Prof 2018;15(0):12
  • 47,365 View
  • 246 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Esoteric jargon and technical language are potential barriers to the teaching of science and medicine. Effective teaching strategies which address these barriers are desirable. Here, we created and evaluated the effectiveness of standalone learning ‘equivalence-based instruction’ (EBI) resources wherein the teaching of a small number of direct relationships between stimuli (e.g., anatomical regions, their function, and pathology) results in the learning of higher numbers of untaught relationships. Methods: We used a pre and post test design to assess students’ learning of the relations. Resources were evaluated by students for perceived usefulness and confidence in the topic. Three versions of the resources were designed, to explore learning parameters such as the number of stimulus classes and the number of relationships within these classes. Results: We show that use of EBI resulted in demonstrable learning of material that had not been directly taught. The resources were well received by students, even when the quantity of material to be learned was high. There was a strong desire for more EBI-based teaching. The findings are discussed in the context of an ongoing debate surrounding ‘rote’ vs. ‘deep’ learning, and the need to balance this debate with considerations of cognitive load and esoteric jargon routinely encountered during the study of medicine. Conclusion: These standalone EBI resources were an effective, efficient and well-received method for teaching neuroanatomy to medical students. The approach may be of benefit to other subjects with abundant technical jargon, such as science and medicine.

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    Anatomical Sciences Education.2020; 13(1): 107.     CrossRef
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    Perspectives on Behavior Science.2018; 41(1): 95.     CrossRef
  • Tools and resources for neuroanatomy education: a systematic review
    M. Arantes, J. Arantes, M. A. Ferreira
    BMC Medical Education.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Corrigendum: Misplacement of images in a table including the structure of the cerebral cortex

    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 12.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions