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Development and psychometric evaluation of a 360-degree evaluation instrument to assess medical students’ performance in clinical settings at the emergency medicine department in Iran: a methodological study  
Golnaz Azami, Sanaz Aazami, Boshra Ebrahimy, Payam Emami
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2024;21:7.   Published online April 1, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2024.21.7
  • 298 View
  • 108 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
In the Iranian context, no 360-degree evaluation tool has been developed to assess the performance of prehospital medical emergency students in clinical settings. This article describes the development of a 360-degree evaluation tool and presents its first psychometric evaluation.
Methods
There were 2 steps in this study: step 1 involved developing the instrument (i.e., generating the items) and step 2 constituted the psychometric evaluation of the instrument. We performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and also evaluated the instrument’s face, content, and convergent validity and reliability.
Results
The instrument contains 55 items across 6 domains, including leadership, management, and teamwork (19 items), consciousness and responsiveness (14 items), clinical and interpersonal communication skills (8 items), integrity (7 items), knowledge and accountability (4 items), and loyalty and transparency (3 items). The instrument was confirmed to be a valid measure, as the 6 domains had eigenvalues over Kaiser’s criterion of 1 and in combination explained 60.1% of the variance (Bartlett’s test of sphericity [1,485]=19,867.99, P<0.01). Furthermore, this study provided evidence for the instrument’s convergent validity and internal consistency (α=0.98), suggesting its suitability for assessing student performance.
Conclusion
We found good evidence for the validity and reliability of the instrument. Our instrument can be used to make future evaluations of student performance in the clinical setting more structured, transparent, informative, and comparable.
Enhancement of the technical and non-technical skills of nurse anesthesia students using the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool in Iran: a quasi-experimental study  
Ali Khalafi, Maedeh Kordnejad, Vahid Saidkhani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:19.   Published online June 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.19
  • 1,189 View
  • 81 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated the effect of evaluations based on the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool (ALMAT) form on improving the technical and non-technical skills of final-year nurse anesthesia students at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS).
Methods
This was a semi-experimental study with a pre-test and post-test design. It included 45 final-year nurse anesthesia students of AJUMS and lasted for 3 months. The technical and non-technical skills of the intervention group were assessed at 4 university hospitals using formative-feedback evaluation based on the ALMAT form, from induction of anesthesia until reaching mastery and independence. Finally, the students’ degree of improvement in technical and non-technical skills was compared between the intervention and control groups. Statistical tests (the independent t-test, paired t-test, and Mann-Whitney test) were used to analyze the data.
Results
The rate of improvement in post-test scores of technical skills was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (P˂0.0001). Similarly, the students in the intervention group received significantly higher post-test scores for non-technical skills than the students in the control group (P˂0.0001).
Conclusion
The findings of this study showed that the use of ALMAT as a formative-feedback evaluation method to evaluate technical and non-technical skills had a significant effect on improving these skills and was effective in helping students learn and reach mastery and independence.
Improvement of the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students using mini-clinical evaluation exercises in Iran: a randomized controlled study  
Ali Khalafi, Yasamin Sharbatdar, Nasrin Khajeali, Mohammad Hosein Haghighizadeh, Mahshid Vaziri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:12.   Published online April 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.12
  • 2,187 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessment on improving the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
Methods
This study started on November 1, 2022, and ended on December 1, 2022. It was conducted among 50 nurse anesthesia students divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention group’s clinical skills were evaluated 4 times using the mini-CEX method. In contrast, the same skills were evaluated in the control group based on the conventional method—that is, general supervision by the instructor during the internship and a summative evaluation based on a checklist at the end of the course. The intervention group students also filled out a questionnaire to measure their satisfaction with the mini-CEX method.
Results
The mean score of the students in both the control and intervention groups increased significantly on the post-test (P<0.0001), but the improvement in the scores of the intervention group was significantly greater compared with the control group (P<0.0001). The overall mean score for satisfaction in the intervention group was 76.3 out of a maximum of 95.
Conclusion
The findings of this study showed that using mini-CEX as a formative evaluation method to evaluate clinical skills had a significant effect on the improvement of nurse anesthesia students’ clinical skills, and they had a very favorable opinion about this evaluation method.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychometric testing of anesthesia nursing competence scale (AnestComp)
    Samira Mahmoudi, Akram Yazdani, Fatemeh Hasanshiri
    Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management.2024; 34: 100368.     CrossRef
  • Application of flipped classroom teaching method based on ADDIE concept in clinical teaching for neurology residents
    Juan Zhang, Hong Chen, Xie Wang, Xiaofeng Huang, Daojun Xie
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparing Satisfaction of Undergraduate Nursing Students`: Mini-CEX vs CIM in Assessing Clinical Competence
    Somia Saghir, Anny Ashiq Ali, Kashif Khan, Uzma Bibi, Shafaat Ullah, Rafi Ullah, Zaifullah Khan, Tahir Khan
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2023; : 134.     CrossRef
  • Enhancement of the technical and non-technical skills of nurse anesthesia students using the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool in Iran: a quasi-experimental study
    Ali Khalafi, Maedeh Kordnejad, Vahid Saidkhani
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 19.     CrossRef
Effect of a smartphone-based online electronic logbook to evaluate the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students in Iran: a randomized controlled study  
Ali Khalafi, Nahid Jamshidi, Nasrin Khajeali, Saeed Ghanbari
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:10.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.10
  • 1,726 View
  • 105 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was conducted to evaluate a smartphone-based online electronic logbook used to assess the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students in Iran.
Methods
This randomized controlled study was conducted after tool development at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in Ahvaz, Iran from January 2022 to December 2022. The online electronic logbook involved in this study was an Android-compatible application used to evaluate the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students. In the implementation phase, the online electronic logbook was piloted for 3 months in anesthesia training in comparison with a paper logbook. For this purpose, 49 second- and third-year anesthesia nursing students selected using the census method were assigned to intervention (online electronic logbook) and control (paper logbook) groups. The online electronic logbook and paper logbook were compared in terms of student satisfaction and learning outcomes.
Results
A total of 39 students participated in the study. The mean satisfaction score of the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P=0.027). The mean score of learning outcomes was also significantly higher for the intervention than the control group (P=0.028).
Conclusion
Smartphone technology can provide a platform for improving the evaluation of the clinical skills of nursing anesthesia students, leading to increased satisfaction and improved learning outcomes.
Effect of a forensic nursing virtual education course on knowledge and clinical decision-making of master’s nursing students in Iran: a non-equivalent control group pre- and post-test study
Zeynab Firuzi, Mitra Sedghi Sabet, Fateme Jafaraghaee, Hedayat Jafari, Ehsan Kazemnezhad Leyli, Samad Karkhah, Mohammad Javad Ghazanfari
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:20.   Published online August 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.20
  • 2,253 View
  • 253 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Forensic nursing is a specialty in the nursing profession based on legal procedures. This study aimed to assess the effect of a forensic nursing virtual education course on knowledge and clinical decision-making among master’s nursing students.
Methods
In a quasi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test, 106 master’s nursing students at Guilan (n=65) and Mazandaran (n=41) Universities of Medical Sciences, Iran were enrolled. Data were collected using census sampling from March to April 2021. Participants in the intervention group received a forensic nursing virtual education course in three 90-minute sessions for 2 days.
Results
A total of 88 out of 106 master’s nursing students were enrolled in this study. The mean post-education score for knowledge in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (12.52 vs. 7.67, P<0.001). The mean post-education score for clinical decision-making in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (16.96 vs. 13.64, P<0.001).
Conclusion
The level of knowledge and clinical decision-making of master’s nursing students regarding forensic evidence improved after the forensic nursing virtual education course in the intervention group compared to the control group. Nursing managers and policymakers can develop appropriate strategies to improve the knowledge and clinical decision-making of nursing students by using forensic nursing education courses in the curricula of nursing programs, especially in postgraduate education as an elective or mandatory course.
Effects of a curriculum integrating critical thinking on medical students’ critical thinking ability in Iran: a quasi-experimental study  
Akbar Soltani, Mahboobeh Khabaz Mafinejad, Maryam Tajik, Hamideh Moosapour, Taha Bayat, Fatemeh Mohseni
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:14.   Published online July 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.14
  • 4,350 View
  • 349 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Improving physicians’ critical thinking abilities could have meaningful impacts on various aspects of routine medical practice, such as choosing treatment plans, making an accurate diagnosis, and reducing medical errors. The present study aimed to measure the effects of a curriculum integrating critical thinking on medical students’ skills at Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
Methods
A 1-group pre-test, post-test quasi-experimental design was used to assess medical students’ critical thinking abilities as they progressed from the first week of medical school to middle of the third year of the undergraduate medical curriculum. Fifty-six participants completed the California Critical Thinking Skills Test twice from 2016 to 2019.
Results
Medical students were asked to complete the California Critical Thinking Skills Test the week before their first educational session. The post-test was conducted 6 weeks after the 2 and half-year program. Out of 91 medical students with a mean age of 20±2.8 years who initially participated in the study, 56 completed both the pre- and post-tests. The response rate of this study was 61.5%. The analysis subscale showed the largest change. Significant changes were found in the analysis (P=0.03), evaluation (P=0.04), and inductive reasoning (P<0.0001) subscales, but not in the inference (P=0.28), and deductive reasoning (P=0.42) subscales. There was no significant difference according to gender (P=0.77).
Conclusion
The findings of this study show that a critical thinking program had a substantial effect on medical students’ analysis, inductive reasoning, and evaluation skills, but negligible effects on their inference and deductive reasoning scores.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Integrated curriculum in the United States pharmacy programs
    Marjan Zakeri, Bilqees Fatima, Sahar Yazdanfard, Sujit S. Sansgiry
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2024; : 102094.     CrossRef
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    Margo Lane, Robyn Dixon, Ken J. Donald, Robert S. Ware
    Health Promotion Journal of Australia.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluating and comparing critical thinking skills of residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences
    Saeed Reza Mehrpour, Amin Hoseini Shavoun, Azita Kheiltash, Rasoul Masoomi, Roya Nasle Seraji
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Construction of structural correlation of quantitative literacy and critical thinking, and factors affecting them in students of pre-service biology teachers
    M. Arsyad, Sri Rahayu Lestari, Murni Sapta Sari, Fatchur Rohman
    Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education.2023; 19(10): em2342.     CrossRef
  • Habilidades del pensamiento crítico y liderazgo docente: propuesta con perspectiva de género para la formación inicial
    Liliana Pedraja-Rejas, Carlos Rodríguez-Cisterna
    Revista Venezolana de Gerencia.2023; 28(104): 1667.     CrossRef
Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:3.   Published online January 27, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.3
  • 8,964 View
  • 266 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine consists of the expression of medical experiences and the reflection on narratives to foster empathic communication with patients. Reflecting on narratives increases self-awareness and recognition of the feelings of the narrator or the story’s main character, which in turn affects the audience. This study was conducted to examine the impact of a narrative medicine program on the reflective capacity and empathy of medical students.
Methods
A quasi-experimental study was performed during the 2018–2019 academic year at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran involving 135 medical interns in 2 groups (control [n=66] and experimental [n=69]). Interns in the experimental group took part in seven 2-hour reflective practice sessions, while those in the control group underwent no educational intervention. Pre-test and post-test assessments were conducted for both groups using 2 valid and reliable tools for the assessment of reflective capacity and empathy. Mean reflection and empathy scores were compared within groups (between pre- and post-test values) and between groups (using the paired-t test and the t-test; P≤0.05).
Results
The mean reflection and empathy scores of the experimental group significantly increased from pre-test to post-test, but those of the control group did not. Moreover, the mean post-test scores were significantly different between the 2 groups (P<0.001).
Conclusion
Narrative medicine is an effective teaching method that can improve reflective capacity and empathy, thereby ultimately promoting professionalism as a core competency in medicine. Consideration of learning conditions and interdisciplinary teaching are necessary for implementing a narrative medicine program.

Citations

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  • Development and psychometric testing of the narrative nursing teaching effectiveness scale: A methodological study
    Yonglin Li, Meilian Lin, Xiujing Lin, Qiuhong Chen, Fangfang Wang, Weiti Chen, Feifei Huang
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 133: 106060.     CrossRef
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  • Narrative Education Combined With Experiential Teaching in the Development of Empathic Competence of Undergraduate Nursing Students: Pre-Test Post-Test Design
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    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
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Development of a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program based on Gagne’s instructional design model in Iran through consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Nikoo Yamani, Payman Adibi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:34.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.34
  • 8,778 View
  • 169 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine is a patient-centered approach focusing on the development of narrative skills and self-awareness that incorporates “attending, representing, and affiliating” in clinical encounters. Acquiring narrative competency promotes clinical performance, and narratives can be used for teaching professionalism, empathy, multicultural education, and professional development. This study was conducted to develop a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program through consensus of a panel.
Methods
This expert panel study was conducted from 2018 to 2019 at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. It included 2 phases: developing a framework in 2 steps and forming an expert panel to validate the framework in 3 rounds. We adapted a 3-stage narrative medicine model with 9 training activities from Gagne’s theory, developed a framework, and then produced a checklist to validate the framework in a multidisciplinary expert panel that consisted of 7 experts. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used to assess the experts’ agreement. The first-round opinions were received by email. Consensus was achieved in the second and third rounds through face-to-face meetings to facilitate interactions and discussion among the experts.
Results
Sixteen valid indicators were approved and 100% agreement was obtained among experts (with median values in the range of 7–9 out of a maximum of 9, with no disagreement), and the framework was validated by the expert panel.
Conclusion
The 16 checklist indicators can be used to evaluate narrative medicine programs as a simple and practical guide to improve teaching effectiveness and promote life-long learning.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Challenges of Implementing the First Narrative Medicine Course for Teaching Professionalism in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 3.     CrossRef
The effects of an empathy role-playing program for operating room nursing students in Iran  
Negin Larti, Elaheh Ashouri, Akram Aarabi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:29.   Published online December 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.29
  • 27,286 View
  • 526 Download
  • 27 Web of Science
  • 27 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a role-playing training program conducted among operating room nursing students on empathetic communication with patients through measurements of empathy scores.
Methods
This study was carried out among 77 operating room nursing students from the first to the fourth years studying at the School of Nursing and Midwifery of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in the academic year 2017–2018. The intervention administered to the experimental group included a 12-hour training program on expressing empathy to patients that incorporated roleplaying. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Student version was completed by the participants before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. A comparative analysis of these 3 time points was conducted.
Results
No significant difference was found in the total pre-intervention mean empathy scores before the intervention between the control group and the experimental group (P= 0.50). However, the total mean empathy scores in the experimental group immediately after and 1 month after the intervention were higher than those in the control group (P< 0.001).
Conclusion
Empathy training through a role-playing technique was effective at improving the empathy scores of operating room nursing students, and this finding also underscores the fact that empathy can be promoted by education. Changing the educational curriculum of operating room nursing students is suggested in order to familiarize them with the concept of empathy in the operating room.

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    Ellen E. Lee, Katherine J. Bangen, Julie A. Avanzino, BaiChun Hou, Marina Ramsey, Graham Eglit, Jinyuan Liu, Xin M. Tu, Martin Paulus, Dilip V. Jeste
    JAMA Psychiatry.2020; 77(9): 925.     CrossRef
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    Charlene R. Williams, Philip T. Rodgers, Jacqueline E. McLaughlin, Thomas A. Angelo, Greene Shepherd
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2020; 84(3): 7497.     CrossRef
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    Rachel Winter, Eyad Issa, Nia Roberts, Robert I Norman, Jeremy Howick
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(9): e036471.     CrossRef
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    Julia Iaconisi, Friederike Hasselblatt, Benjamin Mayer, Michael Schoen, Tobias Maria Böckers, Anja Böckers
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2019; 12(4): 386.     CrossRef
Does learning style preferences influence academic performance among dental students in Isfahan, Iran?  
Najmeh Akhlaghi, Hosein Mirkazemi, Mehdi Jafarzade, Narjes Akhlaghi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:8.   Published online March 24, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.8
  • 43,531 View
  • 397 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The present study aimed to identify the learning preferences of dental students and to characterize their relationship with academic performance at a dental school in Isfahan, Iran.
Methods
This cross-sectional descriptive study included 200 undergraduate dental students from October to November 2016. Data were collected using a 2-part questionnaire. The first part included demographic data, and the second part was a Persian-language version of the visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic questionnaire. Data analysis was conducted with the chi-square test, 1-way analysis of variance, and multiple linear regression.
Results
The response rate was 86.6%. Approximately half of the students (51.5%) had multimodal learning preferences. Among the unimodal group (48.5%), the most common mode was aural (24.0%), followed by kinesthetic (15.5%), reading-writing (8.0%), and visual (1.0%). There was a significant association between academic performance and the reading/writing learning style preference (P< 0.01).
Conclusion
Multimodal learning styles were the most preferred. Among single-mode learning styles, the aural style was most common, followed by the kinesthetic style. Students with a reading/writing preference had better academic performance. The results of this study provide useful information for preparing a more problem-based curriculum with active learning strategies.

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  • Preferred Learning Methods among First-year Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study
    Gholamali Dehghani
    Depiction of Health.2024; 15(1): 27.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative Evaluation of Dental Students’ Perceptions of the Roleplay-Video Teaching Modality in Clinical Courses of Dentistry: A Pilot Study
    Kiran Kumar Ganji, Anil Kumar Nagarajappa, Mohammed G Sghaireen, Kumar Chandan Srivastava, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Shadi Nashwan, Ahmad Al-Qerem, Yousef Khader
    Healthcare.2023; 11(5): 735.     CrossRef
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    Shwu‐Ru Liou, Ching‐Yu Cheng, Tsui‐Ping Chu, Chia‐Hao Chang, Hsiu‐Chen Liu
    Nursing Open.2023; 10(10): 6794.     CrossRef
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    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, Novina Aryanti, Arief Wibawa
    Environmental Disease.2023; 8(3): 78.     CrossRef
  • Unveiling the learning style puzzle: Factors that shape how medical students learn
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, DhiyaulAthifah M. Jasri
    Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU).2023; 16(3): 435.     CrossRef
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    Bahareh Tahani, Skekoufeh Sedaghat Manesh
    BMC Geriatrics.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Tahereh Baherimoghadam, Shahram Hamedani, Manoosh mehrabi, Navid Naseri, Nooshin Marzban
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Identification of Preferred Learning Style of Medical and Dental Students Using VARK Questionnaire
    Ayesha Fahim, Saba Rehman, Fariha Fayyaz, Mariyah Javed, Muhammad Anwaar Alam, Sadia Rana, Fahim Haider Jafari, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães Abreu
    BioMed Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
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    Ahmed Al Kuwaiti
    The Open Dentistry Journal.2021; 15(1): 650.     CrossRef
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    Shahla Momeni Danaei, Niloofar Azadeh, Dana Jafarpur
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  • Learning Style and Academic Achievement among Students at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
    Horyeh Sarbazvatan, Abolghasem Amini, Nayyereh Aminisani, SeyedMorteza Shamshirgaran, Saeideh Ghaffarifar
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Research Articles
Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy  
Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery, Mona Faraji
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:29.   Published online July 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.29
  • 27,957 View
  • 316 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. Methods: A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students’ attitude and practice were assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Results: Before the intervention, no significant differences were found between the group designated to group discussion and those designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students’ practice score was increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Both methods were effective on the students’ attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

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  • Pendidikan Kesehatan Menggunakan Metode Buzz Group Discussion di TK
    Sartini Risky, Erwin Azizi Jayadipraja, Lodes Hadju, Lisnawati Lisnawati
    Jurnal Obsesi : Jurnal Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini.2022; 6(6): 5782.     CrossRef
  • Observation of Patients’ Privacy by Physicians and Nurses and Its Relationship with Patient Satisfaction
    Rahim Baghaei, Somaieh Razmara Iranagh, Nazafarin Ghasemzadeh, Yaser Moradi
    Hospital Topics.2021; 99(4): 171.     CrossRef
  • HEMŞİRELİK ÖĞRENCİLERİNİN HASTA MAHREMİYETİNİ KORUMAYA YÖNELİK DAVRANIŞLARININ BELİRLENMESİ
    Zeynep KIZILCIK ÖZKAN, Semra ÇİL EYİ, Zeliha MAYDA
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2020; 8(2): 312.     CrossRef
Associations of learning style with cultural values and demographics in nursing students in Iran and Malaysia  
Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Rogayah Ja’afar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:42.   Published online August 3, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.42
  • 31,165 View
  • 171 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The goal of the current study was to identify associations between the learning style of nursing students and their cultural values and demographic characteristics. Methods: A non-probability purposive sampling method was used to gather data from two populations. All 156 participants were female, Muslim, and full-time degree students. Data were collected from April to June 2010 using two reliable and validated questionnaires: the Learning Style Scales and the Values Survey Module 2008 (VSM 08). A simple linear regression was run for each predictor before conducting multiple linear regression analysis. The forward selection method was used for variable selection. P-values ≤0.05 and ≤0.1 were considered to indicate significance and marginal significance, respectively. Moreover, multi-group confirmatory factor analysis was performed to determine the invariance of the Farsi and English versions of the VSM 08. Results: The perceptive learning style was found to have a significant negative relationship with the power distance and monumentalism indices of the VSM 08. Moreover, a significant negative association was observed between the solitary learning style and the power distance index. However, no significant association was found between the analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles and cultural values (P>0.05). Likewise, no significant associations were observed between learning style, including the perceptive, solitary, analytic, competitive, and imaginative learning styles, and year of study or age (P>0.05). Conclusion: Students who reported low values on the power distance and monumentalism indices are more likely to prefer perceptive and solitary learning styles. Within each group of students in our study sample from the same school the year of study and age did not show any significant associations with learning style.

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  • Unveiling the learning style puzzle: Factors that shape how medical students learn
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, DhiyaulAthifah M. Jasri
    Indian Journal of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research (KLEU).2023; 16(3): 435.     CrossRef
Vaccination learning experiences of nursing students: a grounded theory study  
Eshagh Ildarabadi, Hossein Karimi Moonaghi, Abbas Heydari, Ali Taghipour, Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:29.   Published online June 18, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.29
  • 28,068 View
  • 216 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to explore the experiences of nursing students being trained to perform vaccinations. Methods: The grounded theory method was applied to gather information through semi-structured interviews. The participants included 14 undergraduate nursing students in their fifth and eighth semesters of study in a nursing school in Iran. The information was analyzed according to Strauss and Corbin’s method of grounded theory. Results: A core category of experiential learning was identified, and the following eight subcategories were extracted: students’ enthusiasm, vaccination sensitivity, stress, proper educational environment, absence of prerequisites, students’ responsibility for learning, providing services, and learning outcomes. Conclusion: The vaccination training of nursing students was found to be in an acceptable state. However, some barriers to effective learning were identified. As such, the results of this study may provide empirical support for attempts to reform vaccination education by removing these barriers.

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  • Vaccine hesitancy educational tools for healthcare providers and trainees: A scoping review
    A. Lip, M. Pateman, M.M. Fullerton, H.M. Chen, L. Bailey, S. Houle, S. Davidson, C. Constantinescu
    Vaccine.2023; 41(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Frontline Involvement in Population COVID-19 Vaccinations: Lived Experience of Nursing Students
    Giulia Villa, Emanuele Galli, Sara Allieri, Riccardo Baldrighi, Adelaide Brunetti, Noemi Giannetta, Duilio Fiorenzo Manara
    Healthcare.2022; 10(10): 1985.     CrossRef
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    Tiffani Chidume, Meghan C. Jones, Ann W. Lambert, Morgan Yordy
    Clinical Simulation in Nursing.2020; 46: 62.     CrossRef
Assessing study skills among a sample of university students: an Iranian survey  
Alireza Didarloo, Hamid Reza Khalkhali
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:8.   Published online May 5, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.8
  • 32,043 View
  • 214 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Numerous studies have revealed that study skills have a constructive role on the academic performance of students, in addition to educational quality, students’ intelligence, and their affective characteristics. This study aims to examine study skills and the factors influencing them among the health sciences students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences in Iran.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study carried out from May to November 2013. A total of 340 Urmia health sciences students were selected using a simple sampling method. Data were collected using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire of Counseling Center of Houston University and analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics.
Results
The mean and standard deviation of the students’ study skills were 172.5±23.2, out of a total score of 240. Around 1.2% of the study skills were weak; 86.8%, moderate; and 12%, good. Among the study skills, the scores of time management, and memory and concentration were better than the others. Also, there was a significant positive correlation between study skills scores and the students’ family housing status and academic level (P<0.05).
Conclusion
Although the majority of the participants had moderate study skills, these were not sufficient and far from good. Improving and promoting the study skills of university students require the designing and implementing of education programs for study strategies. Therefore, decision makers and planners in the educational areas of universities should consider the topic described above.

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  • Improving Learning and Study Strategies in Undergraduate Medical Students: A Pre-Post Study
    Ivan Sisa, María Sol Garcés, Cristina Crespo-Andrade, Claudia Tobar
    Healthcare.2023; 11(3): 375.     CrossRef
  • STUDY SKILLS AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS OF URMIA UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
    Hassan Saber, Ali Heidari, Marziye Mohammadpourr, Hamid Reza Khalkhali, Sima Masudi
    Studies in Medical Sciences.2023; 34(2): 68.     CrossRef
  • Exploring study skills among university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    AshrafM. F Kamel, FathyA Behery, GamalM Kenawy, TarekA El Ghamrawy, MohamedS Ali, MohamedM Nasr, MohammedA Shaheen, RaidS Shatat, MohammedM Baag
    Saudi Journal of Oral Sciences.2020; 7(2): 90.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine
    Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Nalucha Siyanga
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 46.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions