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Research articles
Are we teaching health science students in the United States what they need to know about death and dying coping strategies?  
Randy D. Case, Erica Judie, Tammy Kurszewski, Wenica Brodie, Pollyann Bethel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:29.   Published online November 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.29
  • 4,524 View
  • 222 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This investigation aimed to answer the following questions: are health science students provided with death and dying education before attending clinical rotations, and if so, do the students receiving this type of education perceive it as effective?
Methods
In this descriptive cross-sectional survey, 96 Midwestern State University health science students were surveyed to determine the percentage of students who had received death and dying education before clinical rotations, as well as the students’ perception of educational effectiveness for those who had received end-of-life training. A self-report questionnaire presented nursing, radiologic sciences, and respiratory care students with a series of questions pertaining to the education they had received concerning the death and dying process of patients.
Results
Of the 93 students who had already started their clinical rotations, 55 stated they had not received death and dying education before starting clinical courses. Of the 38 who had received death and dying education, only 17 students believed the training was effective.
Conclusion
It is imperative that health science educational programs implement death and dying education and training into the curriculum, and that criteria for evaluating effectiveness be an essential part of death and dying education and training in order to ensure effectiveness.

Citations

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  • Communication skills training in advance care planning: a survey among medical students at the University of Antwerp
    Mick van de Wiel, Katrien Bombeke, Annelies Janssens
    BMC Palliative Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Changes in the working conditions and learning environment of medical residents after the enactment of the Medical Resident Act in Korea in 2015: a national 4-year longitudinal study  
Sangho Sohn, Yeonjoo Seo, Yunsik Jeong, Seungwoo Lee, Jeesun Lee, Kyung Ju Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:7.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.7
  • 6,433 View
  • 297 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In 2015, the South Korean government legislated the Act for the Improvement of Training Conditions and Status of Medical Residents (Medical Resident Act). This study investigated changes in the working and learning environment pre- and post-implementation of the Medical Resident Act in 2017, as well as changes in training conditions by year post-implementation.
Methods
An annual cross-sectional voluntary survey was conducted by the Korean Intern Resident Association (KIRA) between 2016 and 2019. The learning and working environment, including extended shift length, rest time, learning goals, and job satisfaction, were compared by institution type, training year, and specialty.
Results
Of the 55,727 enrollees in the KIRA, 15,029 trainees took the survey, and the number of survey participants increased year by year (from 2,984 in 2016 to 4,700 in 2019). Overall working hours tended to decrease; however, interns worked the most (114 hours in 2016, 88 hours in 2019; P<0.001). Having 10 hours or more of break time has gradually become more common (P<0.001). Lunch breaks per week decreased from 5 in 2017 to 4 in 2019 (P<0.001). Trainees’ sense of educational deprivation due to physician assistants increased from 17.5% in 2016 to 25.6% in 2018 (P<0.001). Awareness of tasks and program/work achievement goals increased from 29.2% in 2016 to 58.3% in 2018 (P<0.001). Satisfaction with the learning environment increased over time, whereas satisfaction with working conditions varied.
Conclusion
The Medical Resident Act has brought promising changes to the training of medical residents in Korea, as well as their satisfaction with the training environment.

Citations

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  • Developing and Establishing a Wound Dressing Team: Experience and Recommendations
    Sik Namgoong, Seunghee Baik, Seung-Kyu Han, Ji-Won Son, Jae-Yeon Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of resident work hours on well‐being, performance, and education: A review from a Japanese perspective
    Kazuya Nagasaki, Hiroyuki Kobayashi
    Journal of General and Family Medicine.2023; 24(6): 323.     CrossRef
  • Developing prompts from large language model for extracting clinical information from pathology and ultrasound reports in breast cancer
    Hyeon Seok Choi, Jun Yeong Song, Kyung Hwan Shin, Ji Hyun Chang, Bum-Sup Jang
    Radiation Oncology Journal.2023; 41(3): 209.     CrossRef
  • Shortening shift’s length—Should we ask the residents if this is what they want?
    Yehuda Hershkovitz, Adi Rasco, Orna Tal, David C. Mohr
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(8): e0272548.     CrossRef
  • The Number of Monthly Night Shift Days and Depression Were Associated with an Increased Risk of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness in Emergency Physicians in South Korea
    Song Yi Park, Hyung Min Lee, Jiyoung Kim
    Behavioral Sciences.2022; 12(8): 279.     CrossRef
Perception of clinical educational environment by student of physiotherapy based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile  
Karen Córdova-León, Lincoyán Fernández-Huerta, Marcela Rojas-Vargas
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:16.   Published online June 14, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.16
  • 18,340 View
  • 271 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aimed at describing the perception of the clinical educational environment by physiotherapy students based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile.
Methods
The clinical education environment was evaluated according to the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) by 192 students originally enrolled in the fifth year of the physiotherapy career at 3 different headquarters of the academic institution: Santiago, Viña del Mar, and Concepcion Campus (Metropolitan, Valparaiso, and Bio Bio region, respectively), from March to October 2018. The Cronbach’s α was applied to measure the reliability of the instrument and the Student-t and analysis of variance tests were used to compare the differences of PHEEM scores by headquarters, environmental areas, and experience of internship.
Results
A total overall average score of 125.88 was obtained, which meant an excellent educational environment. The overall score was 127.6±22.7 for headquarters 1, 125.6±21.6 for headquarters 2, and 122.5±26.9 for headquarters 3. According to the type of establishment, the scores were of 127.1±22.1 for private and 123.5±26.3 for public institutes. According to the type of area, the score was cataloged as an excellent educational environment in all cases, except in the respiratory care area (lowest score, 117.5±29.1). Finally, the score was 126.9±20.5 for the first internship, 121.7±29.3 for the second, and 129.4±19.6 for the third.
Conclusion
There is relative homogeneity of the clinical educational environment for different headquarters, types of establishment, or type of area; but there are significant differences in the number of the internship. The promotion of a good clinical educational environment can have an important impact on the development and performance of the future professional, being the detection of negative aspects an opportunity to improve the hidden curriculum.

Citations

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  • KNOWLEDGE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS ABOUT SUPERVISION SKILLS DURING THE CLINICAL ROTATION OF INTERNSHIP
    Dr. Tabish Fahim, Dr. Shadab Uddin
    Pakistan Journal of Rehabilitation.2021; 10(2): 31.     CrossRef
  • Moroccan residents’ perceptions of the hospital learning environment measured with the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure
    Hajar Berrani, Redouane Abouqal, Amal Thimou Izgua
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 4.     CrossRef
  • Measuring the impact of oceanographic indices on species distribution shifts: The spatially varying effect of cold‐pool extent in the eastern Bering Sea
    James T. Thorson
    Limnology and Oceanography.2019; 64(6): 2632.     CrossRef
Cross-validation of the Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning Scale in the United States  
Donald H. Lein, John D. Lowman, Christopher A. Eidson, Hon K. Yuen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:15.   Published online June 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.15
  • 33,486 View
  • 329 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to cross-validate the factor structure of the previously developed Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning (TBL) Scale among students in an entry-level doctor of physical therapy (DPT) program in the United States.
Methods
Toward the end of the semester in 2 patient/client management courses taught using TBL, 115 DPT students completed the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale, with a response rate of 87%. Principal component analysis (PCA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were conducted to replicate and confirm the underlying factor structure of the scale.
Results
Based on the PCA for the validation sample, the original 2-factor structure (preference for TBL and preference for teamwork) of the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale was replicated. The overall goodness-of-fit indices from the CFA suggested that the original 2-factor structure for the 15 items of the scale demonstrated a good model fit (comparative fit index, 0.95; non-normed fit index/Tucker-Lewis index, 0.93; root mean square error of approximation, 0.06; and standardized root mean square residual, 0.07). The 2 factors demonstrated high internal consistency (alpha= 0.83 and 0.88, respectively). DPT students taught using TBL viewed the factor of preference for teamwork more favorably than preference for TBL.
Conclusion
Our findings provide evidence supporting the replicability of the internal structure of the Student Perceptions of TBL Scale when assessing perceptions of TBL among DPT students in patient/client management courses.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Escala de Aprendizaje Metarregulado (AMR) en estudiantes universitarios
    Marybel E. Mollo-Flores, Angel Deroncele-Acosta, Roger P. Norabuena-Figueroa, Klinge O. Villalba-Condori
    Campus Virtuales.2023; 12(2): 175.     CrossRef
  • Use of Team-Based Learning Pedagogy to Prepare for a Pharmacy School Accreditation Self-Study
    Ruth Vinall, Ashim Malhotra, Jose Puglisi
    Pharmacy.2021; 9(3): 148.     CrossRef
  • Student Perceptions of Team-Based Learning in the Criminal Justice Classroom
    Jessica M. Craig, Brooke Nodeland, Roxanne Long, Emily Spivey
    Journal of Criminal Justice Education.2020; 31(3): 372.     CrossRef
Development of the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire in the United States  
Michelle E. Wormley, Wendy Romney, Anna E. Greer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:14.   Published online June 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.14
  • 33,434 View
  • 386 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to develop a valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness within the field of physical therapy.
Methods
The Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire (CTEQ) was developed via a 4-stage process, including (1) initial content development, (2) content analysis with 8 clinical instructors with over 5 years of clinical teaching experience, (3) pilot testing with 205 clinical instructors from 2 universities in the Northeast of the United States, and (4) psychometric evaluation, including principal component analysis.
Results
The scale development process resulted in a 30-item questionnaire with 4 sections that relate to clinical teaching: learning experiences, learning environment, communication, and evaluation.
Conclusion
The CTEQ provides a preliminary valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness in physical therapy practice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Professional Experience Related to Self-Assessed Teaching Effectiveness Among Physical Therapist Clinical Instructors
    Stacy Carmel, Lori Kupczynski, Shannon Groff, William Bannon
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2023; 37(2): 108.     CrossRef
  • The Medical Training Evaluation Questionnaire (MeTrE-Q): a multidimensional self-report instrument for assessing the quality of midwifery students' education
    Valentina Lucia La Rosa, Michał Ciebiera, Kornelia Zaręba, Enrique Reyes-Muñoz, Tais Marques Cerentini, Fabio Barra, Simone Garzon, Gaetano Riemma, Pasquale De Franciscis, Antonio Simone Laganà, Salvatore Giovanni Vitale
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.2022; 42(5): 968.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Teaching Competencies in Physical Therapist Education: A Modified Delphi Study
    Katherine Myers, Catherine Bilyeu, Kyle Covington, Amanda Sharp
    Physical Therapy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Construct Validity and Internal Consistency of the Physical Therapist Student Evaluation of Clinical Experience and Clinical Instruction
    Sean Gallivan
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022; 36(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric Properties of Visual Indicators of Teaching and Learning Success “VITALS” Instrument for Evaluation of Clinical Teachers
    Nada Al-Yousuf, Salah Eldin Kassab, Hasan Alsetri, Hossam Hamdy
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 905.     CrossRef
  • Attributes of Effective Clinical Teachers in Dental Hygiene Education
    Dayna E. Artim, Dianne Smallidge, Linda D. Boyd, Jessica N. August, Jared Vineyard
    Journal of Dental Education.2020; 84(3): 308.     CrossRef
  • A questionnaire survey of difficulties in clinical practice perceived by physical therapy students
    Masae Shinozaki, Takashi Fukaya, Yasutsugu Asakawa, Yukari Ohashi
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science.2020; 32(12): 856.     CrossRef
  • Using a Valid and Reliable Measure to Assess Clinical Instructor Self-perception of Teaching Behaviors
    Michelle E. Wormley, Wendy Romney, Kristin Schweizer, Beverly Fein, Vicki LaFay, Rebecca Martin, Anna E. Greer
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2018; 32(4): 344.     CrossRef
Research Article
Dental students’ and lecturers’ perception of the degree of difficulty of caries detection associated learning topics in Brazil  
Juan Sebastian Lara, Mariana Minatel Braga, Caleb Shitsuka, Chao Lung Wen, Ana Estela Haddad
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:56.   Published online December 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.56
  • 31,544 View
  • 180 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
It aimed to explore the degree of difficulty of caries-detection-associated-topics perceived by dental students and lecturers as pedagogical step in the development of learning objects for e-learning. Methods: A convenience sample comprising ninety-eight subjects from different academic levels (undergraduate/graduate students and pediatric dentistry lecturers) participated. Two spreadsheets (isolated/relative) were created considering key topics in the caries detection process. The isolated evaluation intended to explore each topic in an isolated way, while the relative intended to classify, comparatively, the participants’ perceived difficulty per topic. Afterwards, data were analyzed. All values on spreadsheets were combined obtaining the subject’s final perception. Associations between the subjects’ degree of the perceived difficulty and academic level were estimated. ANOVA was used to determine differences regarding the perception among evaluated topics in distinct groups. Results: Caries histopathology and detection of proximal carious lesions were the topics perceived as the most difficult in the process of caries detection by both students and lecturers. Differentiation between an extrinsic pigmentation and a brown-spot (caries lesion) as well as differential diagnosis between caries and enamel developmental defects or non-carious lesions were considered as more difficult by undergraduates in comparison to graduates/lecturers (regression-coefficient=14.54; Standard Error=3.34; P<0.001 and 8.40, 3.31, and 0.01 respectively). Conclusion: Topics as histopathology and detection of proximal caries lesions were identified as the most difficult despite the academic level. However, some topics are differently perceived according to the group. These results are useful for developing pedagogical material, based on the students real learning needs/expectations.

Citations

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  • Developing diagnostic skills from preclinical dental education: Caries detection and assessment using e‐learning assisted practice
    Alfonso Escobar, Diego F. Rojas‐Gualdrón, Luis F. Velez, Lourdes Santos‐Pinto
    Journal of Dental Education.2022; 86(10): 1382.     CrossRef
  • Dental Students’ Ability to Detect Only-Enamel Proximal Caries on Bitewing Radiographs
    Mohamed Samir A Elnawawy, Harshkant Gharote
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Disruptions in Health Professional Education: Use of Cognitive Load Theory on Students' Comprehension, Cognitive Load, Engagement, and Motivation
    Siti Nurma Hanim Hadie, Vina Phei Sean Tan, Norsuhana Omar, Nik Aloesnisa Nik Mohd Alwi, Hooi Lian Lim, Ku Ishak Ku Marsilla
    Frontiers in Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Virtual 3D Dynamic Model of Caries Lesion Progression as a Learning Object for Caries Detection Training and Teaching: Video Development Study
    Juan Sebastian Lara, Mariana Minatel Braga, Carlos Gustavo Zagatto, Chao Lung Wen, Fausto Medeiros Mendes, Pedroza Uribe Murisi, Ana Estela Haddad
    JMIR Medical Education.2020; 6(1): e14140.     CrossRef
  • Do undergraduate dental students perform well detecting and staging caries and assessing activity by visual examination? A systematic review and meta‐analysis
    Ronairo Z. Turchiello, Djessica Pedrotti, Mariana M. Braga, Rachel O. Rocha, Jonas A. Rodrigues, Tathiane L. Lenzi
    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry.2019; 29(3): 281.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Moroccan medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment  
Jihane Belayachi, Rachid Razine, Amina Boufars, Asma Saadi, Naoufal Madani, Souad Chaouir, Redouane Abouqal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:47.   Published online October 28, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.47
  • 26,776 View
  • 157 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to assess students’ perceptions of their educational environment in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, using the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Rabat, Morocco, in which medical students’ perceptions of their educational environment were assessed using the DREEM criteria during the 2013-2014 academic years. The DREEM inventory encompasses 50 items divided into five subdomains: perceptions of learning, perceptions of teaching, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. The DREEM has a maximum score of 200, which would correspond to a perfect educational environment. The mean scores (±standard deviation) of students’ responses were compared according to their year of study and gender. The responses of 189 postgraduate medical students were included. The mean total DREEM score was 90.8 (45.4%). The mean total scores for five subdomains were 21.2/48 (44.2%), 21.8/44 (49.6%), 13.1/32 (40.9%), 19.0/48 (39.6%), and 15.6/28 (55.7%) respectively. Female students reported higher perceptions of teaching scores than males (P=0.002), and students in their fifth year of study reported significantly higher social self-perceptions scores than those in their fourth year (P=0.03). In this study of the oldest faculty of medicine in Morocco, students perceived the educational environment as having many problems.

Citations

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  • Revealing the significant shortcomings in the learning environment at the three largest medical schools in Syria: what’s next?
    Ghaith Alfakhry, Ahmad Naeem, M. Bader AboHajar, Aisha Alfakhry, Abdul Fattah Mohandes, Iyad Ali, Ebrahim Makhoul, Nadeem Ahmed, M. Mhdy Abla, Khaled Alhomsi, Issam Jamous
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring student perceptions of the learning environment in four health professions education programs
    Shayna A. Rusticus, Derek Wilson, Tal Jarus, Kathy O’Flynn-Magee, Simon Albon
    Learning Environments Research.2022; 25(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Nurse students' perception of the academic learning environment in Tunisian institutes of nursing sciences: A multisite cross-sectional study
    Khouloud Boukhris, Chekib Zedini, Mariem El Ghardallou
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 111: 105316.     CrossRef
  • Prévalence et facteurs associés à la détresse mentale chez les étudiants de la faculté de médecine de l’université de Parakou en 2020
    Lucrèce Anagonou, Ireti Nethania Elie Ataigba, Robert Baba, Francis Tognon Tchegnonsi, Anselme Djidonou, Émilie Fiossi-Kpadonou, Prosper Gandaho
    Psy Cause.2022; N° 81(2): 4.     CrossRef
  • Educational Environment Assessment by Multiprofessional Residency Students: New Horizons Based on Evidence from the DREEM
    Ana Carolina Arantes Coutinho Costa, Nilce Maria da Silva Campos Costa, Edna Regina Silva Pereira
    Medical Science Educator.2021; 31(2): 429.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Mentoring Environment Through Thematic Analysis of the Learning Environment in Medical Education: a Systematic Review
    Jia Min Hee, Hong Wei Yap, Zheng Xuan Ong, Simone Qian Min Quek, Ying Pin Toh, Stephen Mason, Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019; 34(10): 2190.     CrossRef
  • Mental health and wellbeing among Moroccan medical students: a descriptive study
    Maha Lemtiri Chelieh, Murtaza Kadhum, Thomas Lewis, Andrew Molodynski, Redouane Abouqal, Jihane Belayachi, Dinesh Bhugra
    International Review of Psychiatry.2019; 31(7-8): 608.     CrossRef
  • Adoption and correlates of the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) in the evaluation of undergraduate learning environments – a systematic review
    Christopher Yi Wen Chan, Min Yi Sum, Giles Ming Yee Tan, Phern-Chern Tor, Kang Sim
    Medical Teacher.2018; 40(12): 1240.     CrossRef
  • ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ABOUT EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE IN KERALA
    Paul Daniel, Celine Thalappillil Mathew
    Journal of Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare.2017; 4(51): 3103.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece
    Panteleimon Pantelidis, Nikolaos Staikoglou, Georgios Paparoidamis, Christos Drosos, Stefanos Karamaroudis, Athina Samara, Christodoulos Keskinis, Michail Sideris, George Giannakoulas, Georgios Tsoulfas, Asterios Karagiannis
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 13.     CrossRef
Research Articles
External and internal factors influencing self-directed online learning of physiotherapy undergraduate students in Sweden: a qualitative study  
Catharina Sj?dahl Hammarlund, Maria H. Nilsson, Christina Gummesson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:33.   Published online June 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.33
  • 34,608 View
  • 283 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Online courses have become common in health sciences education. This learning environment can be designed using different approaches to support student learning. To further develop online environment, it is important to understand how students perceive working and learning online. The aim of this study is to identify aspects influencing students’ learning processes and their adaptation to self-directed learning online. Methods: Thirty-four physiotherapy students with a mean age of 25 years (range, 21 to 34 years) participated. Qualitative content analysis and triangulation was used when investigating the students’ self-reflections, written during a five week self-directed, problem-oriented online course. Results: Two categories emerged: ‘the influence of the structured framework’ and ‘communication and interaction with teachers and peers.’ The learning processes were influenced by external factors, e.g., a clear structure including a transparent alignment of assignments and assessment. Important challenges to over-come were primarily internal factors, e.g., low self-efficacy, difficulties to plan the work effectively and adapting to a new environment. Conclusion: The analyses reflected important perspectives targeting areas which enable further course development. The influences of external and internal factors on learning strategies and self-efficacy are important aspects to consider when designing online courses. Factors such as pedagogical design, clarity of purpose, goals, and guidelines were important as well as continuous opportunities for communication and collaboration. Further studies are needed to understand and scaffold the motivational factors among students with low self-efficacy.

Citations

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  • Perception and attitude towards online clinical modules: a cross-sectional study among medical students from two countries
    Heraa Islam, Mohsin Nazeer Muhammed, Sindhura Lakshmi, Aditi Kapoor, Afraz Jahan, Akhila Doddamani, Nagaraja Kamath, Muhammed Ehsan, Suma Nair
    F1000Research.2024; 12: 776.     CrossRef
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    Richard Jaffu
    Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mohammad Madi, Hayat Hamzeh, Sumayeh Abujaber, Zakariya H. Nawasreh
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  • Perception and attitude towards online clinical modules: a cross-sectional study among medical students from two countries
    Heraa Islam, Mohsin Nazeer Muhammed, Sindhura Lakshmi, Aditi Kapoor, Afraz Jahan, Akhila Doddamani, Nagaraja Kamath, Muhammed Ehsan, Suma Nair
    F1000Research.2023; 12: 776.     CrossRef
  • ‘Learning in and out of lockdown’: A comparison of two groups of undergraduate occupational therapy students' engagement in online‐only and blended education approaches during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Ted Brown, Luke Robinson, Kate Gledhill, Mong‐Lin Yu, Stephen Isbel, Craig Greber, Dave Parsons, Jamie Etherington
    Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.2022; 69(3): 301.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the factors affecting the e-learning process in occupational therapy education during the pandemic with principal component analysis
    Başar Öztürk, Remziye Akarsu, Hülya Kayıhan, Yusuf Çelik, Saynur Elif Kayhan
    British Journal of Occupational Therapy.2022; 85(9): 694.     CrossRef
  • Les liens entre les objectifs de formation, les facteurs sociodemographiques et la reussite chez des participants a un MOOC professionnalisant
    Théodore Njingang Mbadjoin, Rawad Chaker
    McGill Journal of Education.2022; 56(1): 149.     CrossRef
  • Perception of online learning among health sciences' students– A mixed methods study
    Komal Maheshwari, Nidhi Ladha, Meenakshi Khapre, Rupinder Deol
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2022; 11(1): 286.     CrossRef
  • THE APPLICABILITY OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN HEALTHCARE TECHNICIAN EDUCATION: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY
    Hakan TEKEDERE, Hanife GÖKER
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2022; 10(2): 488.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the structural relationships between course design factors, learner commitment, self-directed learning, and intentions for further learning in a self-paced MOOC
    Dongho Kim, Eulho Jung, Meehyun Yoon, Yunjeong Chang, Sanghoon Park, Dongsim Kim, Fatih Demir
    Computers & Education.2021; 166: 104171.     CrossRef
  • Undergraduate medical education amid COVID-19: a qualitative analysis of enablers and barriers to acquiring competencies in distant learning using focus groups
    Anika Reinhart, Bastian Malzkorn, Carsten Döing, Ines Beyer, Jana Jünger, Hans Martin Bosse
    Medical Education Online.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Readiness towards online learning among physiotherapy undergraduates
    Harikrishnan Ranganathan, Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh, Saravana Kumar, Shobha Sharma, Siew Kuan Chua, Nabilah Binti Ahmad, Kamalambal Harikrishnan
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • E- Learning experience of the medical profession’s college students during COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia
    Eidan M. Al Zahrani, Yaser A. Al Naam, Saad M. AlRabeeah, Deemah N. Aldossary, Lamiaa H. Al-Jamea, Alexander Woodman, Mohammad Shawaheen, Osama Altiti, Jenifer V. Quiambao, Zechariah J. Arulanantham, Salah H. Elsafi
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enseñanza online en Fisioterapia ¿Es posible? Reflexiones en torno a la situación actual.
    Roy La Touche
    NeuroRehabNews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Krishna Regmi, Linda Jones
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Benita Olivier, Michele Verdonck, Daleen Caseleijn
    JBI Evidence Synthesis.2020; 18(5): 863.     CrossRef
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    Tamara Van Woezik, Rob Reuzel, Jur Koksma, Sandro Serpa
    Cogent Education.2019; 6(1): 1615766.     CrossRef
Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course  
Justin W. Bouw, Vasudha Gupta, Ana L. Hincapie
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:23.   Published online June 11, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.23
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL) modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30) agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30), and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30). However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching.

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The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia  
Ni Ni Win, Vishna Devi V Nadarajah, Daw Khin Win
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:17.   Published online May 8, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.17
  • 42,403 View
  • 207 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Problem-based learning (PBL) is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. Methods: This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students’ perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Results: Thirty of the 31 students (97%) participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students’ motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (P<0.05). The students felt that PBL with learning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (P<0.001). Conclusion: The new PBL implementation described in this study does not require additional instructors or any additional funding. When implemented in a classroom setting, it has pedagogical benefits equivalent to those of small-group sessions. Our findings also suggest that students rely significantly on available learning resources.

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  • Collaborative Problem-based Learning: An Analysis of Problem-Solving Skills in Vocational Schools
    Rachmad Syarifuddin Hidayatullah, Sudirman Rizki Ariyanto, Muhaji, Husni Mubarok, Abebayehu Yohannes
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Brief Reports
How undergraduate medical students reflect on instructional practices and class attendance: a case study from the Shifa College of Medicine, Pakistan  
Talat Ahmed, Abida Shaheen, Fahad Azam
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:7.   Published online March 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.7
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  • 158 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The goal of this study was to assess student perceptions of a variety of instructional practices and attitudes toward class attendance. Data were obtained and analyzed by administering a questionnaire to students of the Shifa College of Medicine, Pakistan in 2011 and 2012. The subjects positively assessed most instructional practices, and in particular felt that teaching sessions conducted in small groups were more valuable than formal lectures in large groups. Students did not like having to give presentations, quizzes, panel discussions, and journal club. A positive correlation was found between the perceived importance of attendance and levels of academic motivation. Of the students surveyed, 11.8% were against mandatory attendance, saying that it reduced motivation and that attendance should be optional. In conclusion, the students had a positive perception of a range of instructional practices, and felt especially positively about practices that involve student activity in small groups. Programmatic improvement in instructional practices might increase class attendance.

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  • Do Medical Students’ Learning Styles and Approaches Explain Their Views and Behavior Regarding Lecture Attendance?
    Ali El Mokahal, Ali Ahmad, Joseph R. Habib, Ali A. Nasrallah, George Francis, Ramzi Sabra, Nathalie K. Zgheib
    Medical Science Educator.2021; 31(5): 1693.     CrossRef
Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study  
P. Ravi Shankar, Rishi Bharti, Ravi Ramireddy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Vivek Nuguri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:9.   Published online May 7, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.9
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students’ perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants’ semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students’ perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20¬–¬25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students’ perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P < 0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum.

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Research Articles
Does curricular change improve faculty perceptions of student experiences with the educational environment? A preliminary study in an institution undergoing curricular change  
Syed Ilyas Shehnaz, Jayadevan Sreedharan, Kadayam Guruswami Gomathi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:7.   Published online April 26, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.7
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
College of Medicine, Gulf Medical University, United Arab Emirates, underwent a major curriculum change from a discipline-based to an organ system-based integrated curriculum. However, it was not known how the faculty perceived the changes in the educational environment as experienced by the students. In this context, we aimed to compare the faculty perceptions of the student experiences in the discipline-based curriculum with those in the organ system-based integrated curriculum.
Methods
The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was modified to assess faculty perceptions of the student experiences, pilot-tested, and administered to all faculty members (n=28) involved in the discipline-based curriculum (FDC) in January 2009. In the subsequent year, data were collected from the same faculty involved in the new integrated curriculum (FIC). Collected data were transferred to Predictive Analytics Software version 18. Total, domain, and individual statement scores were assessed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Percentage agreement, disagreement, and uncertainty were assessed by the McNemar’s test for proportion.
Results
The mean total DREEM score was significantly higher (P<0.001) for FIC (139/200) as compared to FDC (119/200). The FIC perceived significantly more positive student experiences with the educational environment as indicated by the domain scores and statement scores. The differences in proportions of agreement between FIC and FDC also reinforced that the FIC perceived more positive student experiences with the educational environment.
Conclusion
The study showed that the faculty perceived the organ system-based integrated curriculum as providing a better educational environment for the students than the discipline based curriculum.
Physical therapy students’ perceptions of team-based learning in gross anatomy using the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument  
Beven Livingston, Mary Lundy, Shana Harrington
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:1.   Published online January 18, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.1
  • 42,244 View
  • 315 Download
  • 21 Web of Science
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The objective of this study was to assess physical therapy student perceptions of team-based learning (TBL) in a graduate level gross anatomy course using the TBL Student Assessment Instrument (TBL-SAI).
Methods
The TBL-SAI was administered to 85 Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students, comprising three cohorts (classes of 2013, 2014 and 2015), who successfully completed a gross anatomy course where TBL was implemented. The TBL-SAI surveys 33 items, each rated from one (strongly disagree) to five (strongly agree) and measures three subscales: Students' Perceptions of Accountability, Preference for Lecture or TBL, and Student Satisfaction. Results: The means for each subscale and the total TBL-SAI score for each cohort fell above the neutral score. The 2015 group (mean = 37.97, 95% CI [35.67, 40.26]) reported significantly higher satisfaction than that of the 2013 group (mean = 32.71, 95% CI [30.31, 35.05]) and the 2014 group (mean = 33.11, 95% CI [30.69, 35.53]). The 2015 group (mean = 125.3, 95% CI [120.6, 130.3]) also had a significantly higher total score than that of the 2013 group (mean = 115.6, 95% CI [110.5, 120.5]).
Conclusion
The physical therapy students reported an overall positive experience in using TBL to learn gross anatomy in terms of accountability, preference for learning mode, and satisfaction. This positive experience with TBL was accompanied by their successful academic performance. Given the traits and learning preferences in this generation of graduate students, TBL could be a teaching method that is received positively elsewhere and results in successful academic performance and learning.

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Medical students’ perception of the educational environment in a medical college in India: a cross-sectional study using the Dundee Ready Education Environment questionnaire  
Varun Kohli, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:5.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.5
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  • 442 Download
  • 25 Crossref
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions