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Brief report
Higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career among Spanish-speaking physician assistant students after their volunteer work at a student-run free clinic in the United States  
Shannon Weaver, Zainub Hussaini, Virginia Lynn Valentin, Samin Panahi, Sarah Elizabeth Levitt, Jeanie Ashby, Akiko Kamimura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:27.   Published online September 6, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.27
  • 23,618 View
  • 166 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Volunteering at a free clinic may influence career choice among health profession students. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, skills, attitudes, self-efficacy, interest in future work with the underserved, and interest in primary care among physician assistant (PA) students through an analysis of demographic characteristics of PA students at a student-run free clinic in the United States. Data were collected from 56 PA students through a quantitative survey in October 2018 after their participation at a student-run free clinic in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the intermountain west region of the USA. Out of the 3 sub-scales (attitudes, effect, and readiness), students responded most positively to items exploring the effect of their experiences of volunteering at the free clinic. Students who spoke Spanish showed higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career than non-Spanish speakers.
Research article
Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia  
Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:3.   Published online January 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.3
  • 20,968 View
  • 416 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Optimal methods for communication skills training (CST) are an active research area, but the effects of CST on communication performance in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) has not been closely studied. Student roleplay (RP) for CST is common, although volunteer simulated patient (SP) CST is cost-effective and provides authentic interactions. We assessed whether our volunteer SP CST program improved OSCE performance compared to our previous RP strategy.
Methods
We performed a retrospective, quasi-experimental study of 2 second-year medical student cohorts’ OSCE data in Australia. The 2014 cohort received RP-only CST (N=182) while the 2016 cohort received SP-only CST (N=148). The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare the total scores in 3 assessment domains: generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Results
The baseline characteristics of groups (scores on the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test, and medicine program interviews) showed no significant differences between groups. For each domain, the SP-only CST group demonstrated superior OSCE outcomes, and the difference between cohorts was significant (P<0.01). The superiority of volunteer SP CST over student RP CST in terms of OSCE performance outcomes was found for generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Conclusion
The better performance of the SP cohort in physical examination/procedural skills might be explained by the requirement for patient compliance and cooperation, facilitated by good generic communication skills. We recommend a volunteer SP program as an effective and efficient way to improve CST among junior medical students.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perceived authenticity across three forms of educational simulations—the role of interactant representation, task alignment, and continuity of simulation
    Caroline Corves, Matthias Stadler, Martin R. Fischer
    European Journal of Psychology of Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A cost analysis of a 5-day simulation-based learning program for speech-language pathology student training
    Elizabeth C. Ward, Emma Caird, Saval Khanal, Sanjeewa Kularatna, Joshua Byrnes, Adriana Penman, Sue Mcallister, Stacey Baldac, Elizabeth Cardell, Rachel Davenport, Bronwyn Davidson, Sally Hewat, Simone Howells, Patricia Mccabe, Alison Purcell, Joanne Walt
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.2023; 25(5): 688.     CrossRef
  • Perception of simulation-based first-aid training by medical students: a qualitative descriptive study
    Lukáš Plch, Daniel Barvík, Tereza Prokopová, Aneta Pilátová, Tereza Vafková, Jiří Zounek
    SN Social Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for the evaluation of Kampo medicine training
    Marie Amitani, Haruka Amitani, Hajime Suzuki, Suguru Kawazu, Kimiko Mizuma, Kojiro Yamaguchi, Toshimichi Oki, Hideaki Nitta, Takuro Sonoda, Keiko Kawano, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Nanami Uto, Rie Ibusuki, Ryutaro Arita, Shin Takayama, Tadamichi Mitsuma, Toshiro Ta
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Use of Simulated Patients Is more Effective than Student Role Playing in Fostering Patient-Centred Attitudes during Communication Skills Training: A Mixed Method Study
    Stanislaw Gorski, Anna Prokop-Dorner, Michal Pers, Agata Stalmach-Przygoda, Łukasz Malecki, Grzegorz Cebula, Katrien Bombeke, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães Abreu
    BioMed Research International.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Improved detection of patient centeredness in objective structured clinical examinations through authentic scenario design
    Kye-Yeung Park, Hoon-Ki Park, Hwan-Sik Hwang, Sang-Ho Yoo, Jae-Sook Ryu, Jong-Hoon Kim
    Patient Education and Counseling.2021; 104(5): 1094.     CrossRef
  • Interventions for improving medical students' interpersonal communication in medical consultations
    Conor Gilligan, Martine Powell, Marita C Lynagh, Bernadette M Ward, Chris Lonsdale, Pam Harvey, Erica L James, Dominique Rich, Sari P Dewi, Smriti Nepal, Hayley A Croft, Jonathan Silverman
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • Raising rare disease awareness using red flags, role play simulation and patient educators: results of a novel educational workshop on Raynaud phenomenon and systemic sclerosis
    S. Sanges, M.-M. Farhat, M. Assaraf, J. Galland, E. Rivière, C. Roubille, M. Lambert, C. Yelnik, H. Maillard, V. Sobanski, G. Lefèvre, D. Launay, S. Morell-Dubois, E. Hachulla
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improved clinical communication OSCE scores after simulation-based training: Results of a comparative study
    Alexandre Nuzzo, Alexy Tran-Dinh, Marie Courbebaisse, Hugo Peyre, Patrick Plaisance, Alexandre Matet, Brigitte Ranque, Albert Faye, Victoire de Lastours, Conor Gilligan
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238542.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of students' performance of objective structured clinical examination during clinical practice
    Jihye Yu, Sukyung Lee, Miran Kim, Janghoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2020; 32(3): 231.     CrossRef
Research Article
The role of prehealth student volunteers at a student-run free clinic in New York, United States  
Syed H. Shabbir, Maria Teresa M. Santos
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:49.   Published online October 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.49
  • 26,577 View
  • 141 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The medical student-run Einstein Community Health Outreach Clinic provides free healthcare to the uninsured adult population of New York, the United States. During the summer, prehealth student volunteers are recruited to assist with clinic operations. Methods: We designed a survey study to identify the baseline characteristics of the volunteers between June and August of 2013 and 2014 in order to evaluate the influence of working in a medical student-run free clinic on their education, impressions, and career goals. Results: A total of 38 volunteers (response rate, 83%) participated in the study. The volunteers were demographically diverse and interested in primary care specialties and community service. Conclusion: After the Einstein Community Health Outreach program, the volunteers showed an improved understanding of the healthcare process and issues relevant to uninsured patients. They also developed favorable attitudes towards primary care medicine and an increased level of interest in pursuing careers in primary care.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Learning Outcomes from Participation in Student-Run Health Clinics: A Systematic Review
    Oliver WA Wilson, Patrick Broman, Ema Tokolahi, Patrea Andersen, Sharon Brownie
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2023; Volume 16: 143.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Student-Faculty Collaborative Clinics on Patients’ Health Seeking Behaviors in Underserved Communities
    Rewan Abdelwahab, Sarah Abdelwahab, Maria Kaltchenko, Mie Hallman, Gina Kruse, Jacqueline T. Chu, Marya J. Cohen
    Journal of Community Health.2022; 47(2): 378.     CrossRef
  • Student Experiences and Perceptions of Participation in Student-Led Health Clinics: A Systematic Review
    Lynne Briggs, Patricia Fronek
    Journal of Social Work Education.2020; 56(2): 238.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions