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Research article
Development of a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program based on Gagne’s instructional design model in Iran through consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Nikoo Yamani, Payman Adibi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:34.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.34
  • 8,782 View
  • 169 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine is a patient-centered approach focusing on the development of narrative skills and self-awareness that incorporates “attending, representing, and affiliating” in clinical encounters. Acquiring narrative competency promotes clinical performance, and narratives can be used for teaching professionalism, empathy, multicultural education, and professional development. This study was conducted to develop a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program through consensus of a panel.
Methods
This expert panel study was conducted from 2018 to 2019 at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. It included 2 phases: developing a framework in 2 steps and forming an expert panel to validate the framework in 3 rounds. We adapted a 3-stage narrative medicine model with 9 training activities from Gagne’s theory, developed a framework, and then produced a checklist to validate the framework in a multidisciplinary expert panel that consisted of 7 experts. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used to assess the experts’ agreement. The first-round opinions were received by email. Consensus was achieved in the second and third rounds through face-to-face meetings to facilitate interactions and discussion among the experts.
Results
Sixteen valid indicators were approved and 100% agreement was obtained among experts (with median values in the range of 7–9 out of a maximum of 9, with no disagreement), and the framework was validated by the expert panel.
Conclusion
The 16 checklist indicators can be used to evaluate narrative medicine programs as a simple and practical guide to improve teaching effectiveness and promote life-long learning.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Challenges of Implementing the First Narrative Medicine Course for Teaching Professionalism in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 3.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Perceptions of dental undergraduates in India of a clinical induction program  
Arati Panchbhai
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:32.   Published online June 21, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.32
  • 23,748 View
  • 154 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to investigate undergraduate students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program for dental undergraduates conducted at the DMIMS Deemed University, Sawangi-Meghe, India. Seventy-four third-year dental students who entered the clinical phase of the dental program in 2012 and attended all sessions of the clinical induction program were enrolled in this study. The students’ perceptions of the clinical induction program were assessed through a Likert-scale questionnaire, focus group discussions, and individual interviews. Seventy-two students (97.3%) responded positively about the program, evaluating it as successful and making a few suggestions. Fifty-four students (73.0%) stated that the clinical tours and visits to the departments were the best feature of the program. Nine students (12.2%) suggested that the program should include interaction with their immediate seniors and that interactive activities should be included in the program. The induction program may help students become acclimated during the first few days of being introduced into the clinical phase of their education. It is crucial to ensure that students do not develop a negative attitude towards their educational program by facilitating their smooth transition to the clinical phase.
Research Article
Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India  
Satendra Singh, Navjeevan Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:12.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.12
  • 32,279 View
  • 240 Download
  • 37 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers) were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors.
Methods
Volunteer faculty (n=52), near-peers (n=57), and new entrants (n=148) admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]).
Results
Many respondent faculty (27, 96%) and mentees (65, 88%) believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33%) to 34/74 (46%). Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees); 23 mentees (82%) wanted to become near-peers themselves.
Conclusion
Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

Citations

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  • Outcomes of a Near-Peer Intern Orientation Boot Camp
    Rashid Alhusain, Astha Saini, Hersimren Minhas, Ahmed K Ahmed, Patrick Bishop, Baraa Osman, Hajra Khan, Omeralfaroug Adam, Jarrett J Weinberger, Diane L Levine
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Laura Gehreke, Hannes Schilling, Simone Kauffeld
    Review of Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Uncovering heterogeneity in mental health changes among first-year medical students
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    Medical Education Online.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Lea Pölczman, Márk Jámbor, Zsuzsa Győrffy, György Purebl, András Végh, Edmond Girasek
    Frontiers in Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Impact on Peer Mentorship After Implementation of a Competency-Based Residency Curriculum in Canadian Radiation Oncology Training Programs
    David Y. Mak, Janet Papadakos, Joanne Alfieri, Jennifer Croke, Paris-Ann Ingledew, Shaun K. Loewen, Meredith Giuliani
    Advances in Radiation Oncology.2024; 9(5): 101462.     CrossRef
  • PeTe (Peer Teaching) Mentors: How Near Peer Mentoring (NPM) Affects Academic Success and Retention in Design Education
    Tilanka Chandrasekera, Zahrasadat Hosseini, Aditya Jayadas, Lynn M. Boorady
    Innovative Higher Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of a pilot virtual mentorship program for medical students interested in surgery
    Jihane Jadi, Elizabeth Shaughnessy, Linda Barry, Chantal Reyna, Susan Tsai, Stephanie M. Downs-Canner, Sara Myers
    The American Journal of Surgery.2023; 225(2): 229.     CrossRef
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    Elio Arruzza
    Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences.2023; 54(1): 23.     CrossRef
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    Narmeen Ahmed, Shaur Sarfaraz, Iram Khursheed, Zohaib Khurshid, Xiaojing Hu
    Education Research International.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Accessing Mental Health Support Services in Undergraduate Medical Training: A Multicenter, Qualitative Study
    Wen Qing Wendy Ye, Bradley A. Rietze, Sydney McQueen, Kevin Zhang, Lena C. Quilty, Christine M. Wickens
    Academic Medicine.2023; 98(4): 491.     CrossRef
  • Implementing a Near Peer Instructor Placement Model in Physiotherapy Education
    Madeleine Simmons, Jasdeep Dhir, Sarah Wojkowski, Kristina K. Durham
    Physiotherapy Canada.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Amy B. Yanke, Kelly A. Weigand, Erik H. Hofmeister
    New Directions for Teaching and Learning.2023; 2023(176): 83.     CrossRef
  • Pre-service Teachers’ Motivations to Participate in the Near-Peer Mentoring Program
    Dilara KARA-ZORLUOGLU, Ilkem OZDİNC, Busra KARGA, Gaye CEYHAN
    Sakarya University Journal of Education.2023; 13(3): 484.     CrossRef
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    Coralea Kappel, Waseem Hijazi, Nishma Singhal
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Developing a well-received pre-matriculation program: the evolution of MedFIT
    Alexa Allen, Brandon Conner, Brooke Gantman, Kendal Warner, Ranna Nash, Brady Janes, Megan Hellum, Cherie Singer
    Discover Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Donna L. Schuman, Rupal M. Parekh, Noelle L. Fields, Deborah Woody, Vivian J. Miller
    Journal of Teaching in Social Work.2021; 41(1): 42.     CrossRef
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    Jia Yan Chong, Ann Hui Ching, Yaazhini Renganathan, Wei Qiang Lim, Ying Pin Toh, Stephen Mason, Lalit K. R. Krishna
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    Stefanos Karamaroudis, Eleni Poulogiannopoulou, Marinos G. Sotiropoulos, Thomas Kalantzis, Elizabeth O. Johnson
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2020; 13(6): 694.     CrossRef
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    Elise Pauline Skjevik, J. Donald Boudreau, Unni Ringberg, Edvin Schei, Terese Stenfors, Monika Kvernenes, Eirik H. Ofstad
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions