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HOME > J Educ Eval Health Prof > Volume 19; 2022 > Article
Research article Enhanced numeracy skills following team-based learning in United States pharmacy students: a longitudinal cohort study
Rob Edwin Carpenter1*orcid, Leanne Coyne2orcid, Dave Silberman3orcid, Jody Kyoto Takemoto2orcid

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.29
Published online: October 27, 2022
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1Soules College of Business, The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, TX, USA

2College of Pharmacy, West Coast University, Irvine, CA, USA

3Program of Administrative Studies, Boston University Metropolitan College, Boston, MA, USA

Purpose
The literature suggests that the ability to numerate cannot be fully understood without accounting for the social context in which mathematical activity is represented. Team-based learning (TBL) is an andragogical approach with theoretical links to sociocultural and community-of-practice learning. This study aimed to quantitatively explore the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development in 2 cohorts of pharmacy students and identify the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development from a social perspective for healthcare education.
Methods
Two cohorts of students were administered the Health Science Reasoning Test-Numeracy (HSRT-N) before beginning pharmacy school. Two years after using TBL as the primary method of instruction, both comprehensive and domain data from the HSRT-N were analyzed.
Results
In total, 163 pharmacy student scores met the inclusion criteria. The students’ numeracy skills measured by HSRT-N improved after 2 years of TBL instruction.
Conclusion
Numeracy was the most significantly improved HSRT-N domain in pharmacy students following two years of TBL instruction. Although a closer examination of numeracy development in TBL is warranted, initial data suggest that TBL instruction may be an adequate proxy for advancing numeracy in a cohort of pharmacy students. TBL may encourage a social practice of mathematics to improve pharmacy students’ ability to numerate critically.


JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions