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Research article
Medical residents and attending physicians’ perceptions of feedback and teaching in the United States: a qualitative study  
Madeleine Matthiesen, Michael S. Kelly, Kristina Dzara, Arabella Simpkin Begin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:9.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.9
  • 8,431 View
  • 358 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Residents and attendings agree on the importance of feedback to resident education. However, while faculty report providing frequent feedback, residents often do not perceive receiving it, particularly in the context of teaching. Given the nuanced differences between feedback and teaching, we aimed to explore resident and attending perceptions of feedback and teaching in the clinical setting.
Methods
We conducted a qualitative study of internal medicine residents and attendings from December 2018 through March 2019 at the Massachusetts General Hospital to investigate perceptions of feedback in the inpatient clinical setting. Residents and faculty were recruited to participate in focus groups. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis to explore perspectives and barriers to feedback provision and identification.
Results
Five focus groups included 33 total participants in 3 attending (n=20) and 2 resident (n=13) groups. Thematic analysis of focus group transcripts identified 7 themes which organized into 3 thematic categories: (1) disentangling feedback and teaching, (2) delivering high-quality feedback, and (3) experiencing feedback in the group setting. Residents and attendings highlighted important themes in discriminating feedback from teaching. They indicated that while feedback is reactive in response to an action or behavior, teaching is proactive and oriented toward future endeavors.
Conclusion
Confusion between the critical concepts of teaching and feedback may be minimized by allowing them to each have their intended impact, either in response to prior events or aimed toward those yet to take place.

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  • Resident Assessment of Clinician Educators According to Core ACGME Competencies
    Bailey A. Pope, Patricia A. Carney, Mary C. Brooks, Doug R. Rice, Ashly A. Albright, Stephanie A. C. Halvorson
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2024; 39(3): 377.     CrossRef
Brief report
Effects of a simulation-based blended training model on nurses’ treatment decision-related knowledge about oral cancer in Taiwan: a pilot survey  
Chia-Chang Huang, Shiau-Shian Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Shou-Yen Kao
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:10.   Published online May 25, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.10
  • 5,404 View
  • 297 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of virtual reality (VR) simulations combined with bedside assignments on nurses’ self-efficacy in providing pre-treatment educational services. Between March 2019 and November 2020, we conducted a study of VR educational materials that were developed to cover information about the treatment of oral cancers. The effects of the VR simulation, the thinking-path tracking map method, and bedside assignments on the nurses’ treatment decision-related knowledge were evaluated in a ward for oral cancer patients at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. The blended training model significantly increased nurses’ familiarity (P<0.01) and confidence (P<0.03) regarding their knowledge of treatments and treatment decision-related knowledge. This model also significantly increased their confidence in their skills in bedside pre-treatment education for admitted oral cancer patients (P<0.002). Oral cancer-specific VR materials enhanced the effectiveness of skills training among nurses in the oral cancer ward.

Citations

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  • The use of simulation-based education in cancer care: a scoping review
    Amina Silva, Kylie Teggart, Corey Heerschap, Jacqueline Galica, Kevin Woo, Marian Luctkar-Flude
    International Journal of Healthcare Simulation.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the Financial Sustainability of High-Fidelity and Virtual Reality Simulation for Nursing Education
    Michael D. Bumbach, Beth A. Culross, Santanu K. Datta
    CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing.2022; 40(9): 615.     CrossRef
Research articles
Development of a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program based on Gagne’s instructional design model in Iran through consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Nikoo Yamani, Payman Adibi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:34.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.34
  • 8,778 View
  • 169 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine is a patient-centered approach focusing on the development of narrative skills and self-awareness that incorporates “attending, representing, and affiliating” in clinical encounters. Acquiring narrative competency promotes clinical performance, and narratives can be used for teaching professionalism, empathy, multicultural education, and professional development. This study was conducted to develop a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program through consensus of a panel.
Methods
This expert panel study was conducted from 2018 to 2019 at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. It included 2 phases: developing a framework in 2 steps and forming an expert panel to validate the framework in 3 rounds. We adapted a 3-stage narrative medicine model with 9 training activities from Gagne’s theory, developed a framework, and then produced a checklist to validate the framework in a multidisciplinary expert panel that consisted of 7 experts. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used to assess the experts’ agreement. The first-round opinions were received by email. Consensus was achieved in the second and third rounds through face-to-face meetings to facilitate interactions and discussion among the experts.
Results
Sixteen valid indicators were approved and 100% agreement was obtained among experts (with median values in the range of 7–9 out of a maximum of 9, with no disagreement), and the framework was validated by the expert panel.
Conclusion
The 16 checklist indicators can be used to evaluate narrative medicine programs as a simple and practical guide to improve teaching effectiveness and promote life-long learning.

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  • Challenges of Implementing the First Narrative Medicine Course for Teaching Professionalism in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 3.     CrossRef
Satisfaction with and suitability of the problem-based learning program at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine  
Dong Mi Yoo, A Ra Cho, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:20.   Published online July 19, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.20
  • 13,140 View
  • 217 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was conducted to identify suggestions for improving the effectiveness and promoting the success of the current problem-based learning (PBL) program at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine through a professor and student awareness survey.
Methods
A survey was carried out by sending out mobile Naver Form survey pages via text messages 3 times in December 2018, to 44 medical students and 74 professors. In addition, relevant official documents from the school administration were reviewed. The collected data were analyzed to identify the achievement of educational goals, overall satisfaction with, and operational suitability of the PBL program.
Results
The overall satisfaction scores for the PBL program were neutral (students, 3.27±0.95 vs. professors, 3.58±1.07; P=0.118). Regarding the achievement of educational goals, the integration of basic and clinical medicine and encouragement of learning motivation were ranked lowest. Many respondents expressed negative opinions about the modules (students, 25.0%; professors, 39.2%) and tutors (students, 54.5%; professors, 24.3%). The students and professors agreed that the offering timing of the program in medical school and the length of each phase were suitable, while opinions expressed in greater detail pointed to issues such as the classes being held too close to exams and their alignment with regular course units.
Conclusion
Issues with modules and tutors were the most pressing. Detailed and appropriate modules should be developed on the basis of advice from professors with experience in PBL tutoring. Inconsistencies in tutoring should be reduced by standardization and retraining.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effectiveness of problem-based learning methodology in undergraduate medical education: a scoping review
    Joan Carles Trullàs, Carles Blay, Elisabet Sarri, Ramon Pujol
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Student and Tutor Satisfaction with Problem-Based Learning in Azerbaijan
    Ulkar Sattarova, Wim Groot, Jelena Arsenijevic
    Education Sciences.2021; 11(6): 288.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of clinical reasoning research with Asian healthcare professionals
    Ching-Yi Lee, Chang-Chyi Jenq, Madawa Chandratilake, Julie Chen, Mi-Mi Chen, Hiroshi Nishigori, Gohar Wajid, Pai-Hsuang Yang, Muhamad Saiful Bahri Yusoff, Lynn Monrouxe
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2021; 26(5): 1555.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
Does the acceptance of hybrid learning affect learning approaches in France?  
Lionel Di Marco, Alain Venot, Pierre Gillois
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:24.   Published online October 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.24
  • 31,025 View
  • 239 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Acceptance of a learning technology affects students’ intention to use that technology, but the influence of the acceptance of a learning technology on learning approaches has not been investigated in the literature. A deep learning approach is important in the field of health, where links must be created between skills, knowledge, and habits. Our hypothesis was that acceptance of a hybrid learning model would affect students’ way of learning.
Methods
We analysed these concepts, and their correlations, in the context of a flipped classroom method using a local learning management system. In a sample of all students within a single year of study in the midwifery program (n= 38), we used 3 validated scales to evaluate these concepts (the Study Process Questionnaire, My Intellectual Work Tools, and the Hybrid E-Learning Acceptance Model: Learner Perceptions).
Results
Our sample had a positive acceptance of the learning model, but a neutral intention to use it. Students reported that they were distractible during distance learning. They presented a better mean score for the deep approach than for the superficial approach (P< 0.001), which is consistent with their declared learning strategies (personal reorganization of information; search and use of examples). There was no correlation between poor acceptance of the learning model and inadequate learning approaches. The strategy of using deep learning techniques was moderately correlated with acceptance of the learning model (rs= 0.42, P= 0.03).
Conclusion
Learning approaches were not affected by acceptance of a hybrid learning model, due to the flexibility of the tool. However, we identified problems in the students’ time utilization, which explains their neutral intention to use the system.

Citations

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  • Addressing Individual Perception: Extending the Technology Acceptance Model to the Interim Payment Method in Construction Projects
    Lei Zhu, Hui Xiong, Yan Ning, Miaomiao Lv
    Sustainability.2023; 15(9): 7120.     CrossRef
  • Online learning and teaching approaches used in midwifery programs: A scoping review
    Terri Downer, Michelle Gray, Tanya Capper
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 103: 104980.     CrossRef
  • Investigating the Flipped Classroom Model in a High School Writing Course: Action Research to Impact Student Writing Achievement and Engagement
    Elizabeth Ann Florence, Tammi Kolski
    TechTrends.2021; 65(6): 1042.     CrossRef
  • User-centered evaluation of Discord in midwifery education during the COVID-19 pandemic: Analysis of the adaptation of the tool to student needs
    Lionel Di Marco
    European Journal of Midwifery.2021; 5(November): 1.     CrossRef
  • Utilization of Nursing Defect Management Evaluation and Deep Learning in Nursing Process Reengineering Optimization
    Yue Liu, Huaping Liu, Osamah Ibrahim Khalaf
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Utilisation d’outils numériques dans le cadre d’un dispositif hybride pour l’apprentissage par problème de la physiologie en deuxième année des études médicales. Étude de faisabilité du recours au laboratoire numérique de physiologie « e-ϕsioLab ».
    Fares Gouzi, François Bughin, Lucie Barateau, Agathe Hubert, Savine Volland, Dalila Laoudj-Chenivesse, Emilie Passerieux, Régis Lopez, Antonia Perez-Martin, Iris Schuster-Beck, Stephan Matecki, Michel Dauzat, Yves Dauvilliers, Maurice Hayot, Jacques Merci
    Pédagogie Médicale.2018; 19(2): 77.     CrossRef
Development of the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire in the United States  
Michelle E. Wormley, Wendy Romney, Anna E. Greer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:14.   Published online June 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.14
  • 33,280 View
  • 385 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to develop a valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness within the field of physical therapy.
Methods
The Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire (CTEQ) was developed via a 4-stage process, including (1) initial content development, (2) content analysis with 8 clinical instructors with over 5 years of clinical teaching experience, (3) pilot testing with 205 clinical instructors from 2 universities in the Northeast of the United States, and (4) psychometric evaluation, including principal component analysis.
Results
The scale development process resulted in a 30-item questionnaire with 4 sections that relate to clinical teaching: learning experiences, learning environment, communication, and evaluation.
Conclusion
The CTEQ provides a preliminary valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness in physical therapy practice.

Citations

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  • Professional Experience Related to Self-Assessed Teaching Effectiveness Among Physical Therapist Clinical Instructors
    Stacy Carmel, Lori Kupczynski, Shannon Groff, William Bannon
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2023; 37(2): 108.     CrossRef
  • The Medical Training Evaluation Questionnaire (MeTrE-Q): a multidimensional self-report instrument for assessing the quality of midwifery students' education
    Valentina Lucia La Rosa, Michał Ciebiera, Kornelia Zaręba, Enrique Reyes-Muñoz, Tais Marques Cerentini, Fabio Barra, Simone Garzon, Gaetano Riemma, Pasquale De Franciscis, Antonio Simone Laganà, Salvatore Giovanni Vitale
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.2022; 42(5): 968.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Teaching Competencies in Physical Therapist Education: A Modified Delphi Study
    Katherine Myers, Catherine Bilyeu, Kyle Covington, Amanda Sharp
    Physical Therapy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Construct Validity and Internal Consistency of the Physical Therapist Student Evaluation of Clinical Experience and Clinical Instruction
    Sean Gallivan
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022; 36(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric Properties of Visual Indicators of Teaching and Learning Success “VITALS” Instrument for Evaluation of Clinical Teachers
    Nada Al-Yousuf, Salah Eldin Kassab, Hasan Alsetri, Hossam Hamdy
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 905.     CrossRef
  • Attributes of Effective Clinical Teachers in Dental Hygiene Education
    Dayna E. Artim, Dianne Smallidge, Linda D. Boyd, Jessica N. August, Jared Vineyard
    Journal of Dental Education.2020; 84(3): 308.     CrossRef
  • A questionnaire survey of difficulties in clinical practice perceived by physical therapy students
    Masae Shinozaki, Takashi Fukaya, Yasutsugu Asakawa, Yukari Ohashi
    Journal of Physical Therapy Science.2020; 32(12): 856.     CrossRef
  • Using a Valid and Reliable Measure to Assess Clinical Instructor Self-perception of Teaching Behaviors
    Michelle E. Wormley, Wendy Romney, Kristin Schweizer, Beverly Fein, Vicki LaFay, Rebecca Martin, Anna E. Greer
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2018; 32(4): 344.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi  
Thokozani Bvumbwe
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:53.   Published online November 23, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.53
  • 27,583 View
  • 215 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to investigate the perceptions of nursing students trained in a new model teaching ward in Malawi. A total of 90students from five nursing colleges were randomly assigned to one model ward and two ordinary wards in a single teaching hospital. The students were administered a revised version of the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment questionnaire. Significant differences among the three wards were found in all items in the communication/feedback subscale, with the exception of the item “nursing staff provided constructive feedback” (P=0.162). Within the learning opportunities subscale all items showed significant differences among the three wards, whereas 50% of the items in the learning support/assistance subscale had significantly different responses among the three wards. Within the department atmosphere subscale, no significant differences were found in the items assessing whether an adequate number and variety of patients were present in the ward (P=0.978). The strategies that are being implemented to improve the educational environment showed positive results. Students scored the model teaching ward highly. Students who underwent precepting in the model teaching wards reported having more learning opportunities and a positive learning environment.

Citations

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  • STUDENT EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL EDUCATION: ENVIRONMENT: DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF THE SECEE VERSION 4
    Kari Sand-Jecklin, Tanya Rogers, Kesheng Wang
    Journal of Nursing Measurement.2023; 31(1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Levels, antecedents, and consequences of critical thinking among clinical nurses: a quantitative literature review
    Yongmi Lee, Younjae Oh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 26.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Learning styles and academic achievement among undergraduate medical students in Thailand  
Wichuda Jiraporncharoen, Chaisiri Angkurawaranon, Manoch Chockjamsai, Athavudh Deesomchok, Juntima Euathrongchit
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:38.   Published online July 8, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.38
  • 36,650 View
  • 332 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to explore the associations between learning styles and high academic achievement and to ascertain whether the factors associated with high academic achievement differed between preclinical and clinical students. Methods: A survey was conducted among undergraduate medical students in Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The Index of Learning Styles questionnaire was used to assess each student’s learning style across four domains. High academic achievement was defined as a grade point average of at least 3.0. Results: Of the 1,248 eligible medical students, 1,014 (81.3%) participated. Learning styles differed between the preclinical and clinical students in the active/reflective domain. A sequential learning style was associated with high academic achievement in both preclinical and clinical students. A reflective learning style was only associated with high academic achievement among preclinical students. Conclusion: The association between learning styles and academic achievement may have differed between preclinical and clinical students due to different learning content and teaching methods. Students should be encouraged to be flexible in their own learning styles in order to engage successfully with various and changing teaching methods across the curriculum. Instructors should be also encouraged to provide a variety of teaching materials and resources to suit different learning styles.

Citations

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  • ESTILOS DE APRENDIZAGEM DE ESTUDANTES DE GRADUAÇÃO EM MEDICINA: COMPARAÇÃO ENTRE DUAS ESCOLAS COM DIFERENTES METODOLOGIAS DE ENSINO DA CIDADE DE MOSSORÓ-RN
    Rilva Lopes de Sousa Muñoz, Ligiane Medeiros Diógenes
    REVISTA FOCO.2023; 16(4): e1538.     CrossRef
  • Learning styles in science education at university level: A systematic review
    Albina R. Shaidullina, Natalia A. Orekhovskaya, Evgeny G. Panov, Marina N. Svintsova, Oksana N. Petyukova, Nataliya S. Zhuykova, Elena V. Grigoryeva
    Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education.2023; 19(7): em2293.     CrossRef
  • Современные образовательные технологии и их использование при изучении физиологии в медицинском вузе
    Б. Ю. Бадалян, А. Л. Торгомян
    Biological Journal of Armenia.2023; : 180.     CrossRef
  • Learning style preference and the academic achievements of medical students in an integrated curriculum
    Adel Mohamed Aboregela
    Journal of Medicine and Life.2023; 16(12): 1802.     CrossRef
  • Crossword puzzle as a learning tool to enhance learning about anticoagulant therapeutics
    Ghada Bawazeer, Ibrahim Sales, Huda Albogami, Ahmed Aldemerdash, Mansour Mahmoud, Majidah A. Aljohani, Abdullah Alhammad
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Kiran Kumar Ganji, Mohammad Khursheed Alam, Ravi Kumar Gudipaneni, Hmoud Algarni, Manay Srinivas Munisekhar, May Osman Hamza, Mohammed Assayed Mousa, Mohammed Ghazi Sghaireen
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Joydeep Dutta Chaudhuri
    Clinical Anatomy.2021; 34(3): 437.     CrossRef
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    Agustín Freiberg Hoffmann, Facundo Abal, Mercedes Fernández Liporace
    Acta Colombiana de Psicología.2020; 23(2): 328.     CrossRef
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    Agustín Freiberg Hoffmann, Facundo Abal, Mercedes Fernández Liporace
    Acta Colombiana de Psicología.2020; 23(2): 328.     CrossRef
  • A cross-sectional study of learning styles among continuing medical education participants
    C. Scott Collins, Sanjeev Nanda, Brian A. Palmer, Arya B. Mohabbat, Cathy D. Schleck, Jayawant N. Mandrekar, Saswati Mahapatra, Thomas J. Beckman, Christopher M. Wittich
    Medical Teacher.2019; 41(3): 318.     CrossRef
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    Ali H. Abusafia, Nurhanis Syazni Roslan, Dariah Mohd Yusoff, Mohd Zarawi Mat Nor
    Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences.2018; 13(4): 370.     CrossRef
  • Does learning style preferences influence academic performance among dental students in Isfahan, Iran?
    Najmeh Akhlaghi, Hosein Mirkazemi, Mehdi Jafarzade, Narjes Akhlaghi
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 8.     CrossRef
  • Learning styles preferences and e-learning experience of undergraduate dental students
    Ana Cláudia DALMOLIN, Giselle Ariana Otto MACKEIVICZ, Márcia Thaís POCHAPSKI, Gibson Luiz PILATTI, Fábio André SANTOS
    Revista de Odontologia da UNESP.2018; 47(3): 175.     CrossRef
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    Madushika Wijesundara, Chamindi Wijerathna, Kasun Wijerathna, Rasangi Wijerathna, Srimali Wijethunga, Ashan Wijewardana, Anuprabha Wickramasinghe, Devarajan Rathish
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    Horyeh Sarbazvatan, Abolghasem Amini, Nayyereh Aminisani, SeyedMorteza Shamshirgaran, Saeideh Ghaffarifar
    Research and Development in Medical Education.2018; 7(2): 77.     CrossRef
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    Serpil Yorganci
    European Journal of Educational Research.2018; volume-7-2(volume7-is): 935.     CrossRef
  • INFLUENCE OF LEARNING STRATEGIES ON LEARNING STYLES: THEIR IMPACT ON ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF COLLEGE STUDENTS FROM BUENOS AIRES
    Agustín Freiberg-Hoffmann, Juliana Beatriz Stover, Natalia Donis
    Problems of Education in the 21st Century.2017; 75(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Learning styles, academic achievement, and mental health problems among medical students in Thailand
    Salilthip Paiboonsithiwong, Natchaya Kunanitthaworn, Natchaphon Songtrijuck, Nahathai Wongpakaran, Tinakon Wongpakaran
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 38.     CrossRef
Evaluation of hospital-learning environment for pediatric residency in eastern region of Saudi Arabia  
Waleed H. BuAli, Abdul Sattar Khan, Mohammad Hussain Al-Qahtani, Shaikha aldossary
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:14.   Published online April 18, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.14
  • 31,197 View
  • 179 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
No study had been conducted to assess the hospitals’ environment for learning purposes in multicenter sites in Saudi Arabia. It aims to evaluate the environment of hospitals for learning purposes of pediatric residents. Methods: We applied Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) to measure the learning environment at six teaching hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia from September to December 2013. Results: The number of respondents was 104 (86.7%) out of 120 residents and 37 females and 67 male residents have responded. The residents’ response scored 100 out of 160 maximum score in rating of PHEEM that showed overall learning environment is favorable for training. There were some items in the social support domain suggesting improvements. There was no significant difference between male and female residents. There was a difference among the participant teaching hospitals (p<0.05). Conclusion: The result pointed an overall positive rating. Individual item scores suggested that their social life during residency could be uninspiring. They have the low satisfactory level and they feel racism, and sexual discrimination. Therefore, there is still a room for improvement.

Citations

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  • Examining the Psychometric Properties of Post-graduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure for Saudi Pediatric Trainees: Principal Component Analysis
    Khouloud Abdulrhman Alsofyani, Saud Bahaidarah, Abdulaziz Boker
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Scoping review of the application of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) in medical residency
    Patrícia Lofêgo Gonçalves, Ana Paula Moscon Marçal, Renata de Almeida França, Vania dos Santos Nunes Nogueira
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Revisão de escopo da aplicação do Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) na residência médica
    Patrícia Lofêgo Gonçalves, Ana Paula Moscon Marçal, Renata de Almeida França, Vania dos Santos Nunes Nogueira
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measuring the Learning Orientation Fostered by Pediatric Residency Programs With the Graduate Medical Education Learning Environment Inventory Instrument
    Jonathan G. Sawicki, Boyd F. Richards, Alan Schwartz, Dorene Balmer
    Academic Pediatrics.2023; 23(6): 1288.     CrossRef
  • State of well-being among residents in a tertiary center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Fatimah Saeed AlAhmari, Alaa Aloqail, Shahad Almansour, Mohammad Bagha
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Trainees’ perceptions on learning environment based on the level of training in a pediatric training program in Indonesia
    Rina Triasih, Felisia Ang, Weda Kusuma, Gandes Retni Rahayu
    Paediatrica Indonesiana.2022; 62(4): 249.     CrossRef
  • Evaluación del ambiente educacional en la residencia de Clínica Pediátrica en un Hospital de Referencia Provincial
    Myriam Lucrecia Medina, Marcelo Gabriel Medina, Nélida Teresita Gauna, Luciana Molfino, Luis Antonio Merino
    Educación Médica.2020; 21(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Moroccan residents’ perceptions of the hospital learning environment measured with the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure
    Hajar Berrani, Redouane Abouqal, Amal Thimou Izgua
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 4.     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the educational environment in a residency programme in Singapore: can we help reduce burnout rates?
    AML Ong, WWS Fong, AKW Chan, GC Phua, CK Tham
    Singapore Medical Journal.2020; 61(9): 476.     CrossRef
  • Sudanese paediatric residents’ perception towards training environment in Sudan Medical Specialisation Board, 2020
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Teaching methods in community health nursing clerkships: experiences of healthcare staff in Iran  
Eshagh Ildarabadi, Hossein Karimi-Moonaghi, Abbas Heydari, Ali Taghipour, Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad, Azizollah Arbabisarjou
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:25.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.25
  • 27,605 View
  • 189 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Healthcare staff educate nursing students during their clerkships at community health nursing programs. Their teaching methods play an important role in nursing students’ acquisition of competencies; however, these methods have not been studied thoroughly. Thus, this study aims to describe, interpret, and understand the experiences of healthcare staff’s teaching methods in clerkships at a community health nursing program. Methods: This study was conducted using purposeful sampling and semi-structured interviews with 13 members of the staff of three urban healthcare centers in Iran. The data were analyzed through qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis. Results: Multiplicity of teaching was identified as the main category of teaching method, and the five subcategories were teaching through lecture, demonstration, doing, visits and field trips, and readiness. The most common method used by the healthcare staff was lecturing. Conclusion: The healthcare staff used multiple methods to teach students in the nursing clerkship of the community health program, which was the strength of the course. However, they should be familiar with, and utilize additional methods, such as discussion rather than lecture.

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  • Community Health Nursing in Iran: A Review of Challenges and Solutions (An Integrative Review)
    Aazam Hosseinnejad, Maryam Rassouli, Simin Jahani, Nasrin Elahi, Shahram Molavynejad
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Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school  
P. Ravi Shankar, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Neelam R. Dwivedi, Vivek Nuguri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:23.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.23
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  • 9 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2%) participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

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Brief Report
Evaluation of the Learning Environment for Diploma in Family Medicine with the Dundee Ready Education Environment (DREEM) Inventory
A. Sattar Khan, Zekeriya Akturk, Tarek Al-Megbil
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2010;7:2.   Published online November 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2010.7.2
  • 35,357 View
  • 188 Download
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PDF

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions