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Research articles
Mentorship and self-efficacy are associated with lower burnout in physical therapists in the United States: a cross-sectional survey study  
Matthew Pugliese, Jean-Michel Brismée, Brad Allen, Sean Riley, Justin Tammany, Paul Mintken
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:27.   Published online September 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.27
  • 3,265 View
  • 292 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated the prevalence of burnout in physical therapists in the United States and the relationships between burnout and education, mentorship, and self-efficacy.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional survey study. An electronic survey was distributed to practicing physical therapists across the United States over a 6-week period from December 2020 to January 2021. The survey was completed by 2,813 physical therapists from all states. The majority were female (68.72%), White or Caucasian (80.13%), and employed full-time (77.14%). Respondents completed questions on demographics, education, mentorship, self-efficacy, and burnout. The Burnout Clinical Subtypes Questionnaire 12 (BCSQ-12) and self-reports were used to quantify burnout, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was used to measure self-efficacy. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed.
Results
Respondents from home health (median BCSQ-12=42.00) and skilled nursing facility settings (median BCSQ-12=42.00) displayed the highest burnout scores. Burnout was significantly lower among those who provided formal mentorship (median BCSQ-12=39.00, P=0.0001) compared to no mentorship (median BCSQ-12=41.00). Respondents who received formal mentorship (median BCSQ-12=38.00, P=0.0028) displayed significantly lower burnout than those who received no mentorship (median BCSQ-12=41.00). A moderate negative correlation (rho=-0.49) was observed between the GSES and burnout scores. A strong positive correlation was found between self-reported burnout status and burnout scores (rrb=0.61).
Conclusion
Burnout is prevalent in the physical therapy profession, as almost half of respondents (49.34%) reported burnout. Providing or receiving mentorship and higher self-efficacy were associated with lower burnout. Organizations should consider measuring burnout levels, investing in mentorship programs, and implementing strategies to improve self-efficacy.
Development and validation of the student ratings in clinical teaching scale in Australia: a methodological study  
Pin-Hsiang Huang, Anthony John O’Sullivan, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:26.   Published online September 5, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.26
  • 1,137 View
  • 120 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to devise a valid measurement for assessing clinical students’ perceptions of teaching practices.
Methods
A new tool was developed based on a meta-analysis encompassing effective clinical teaching-learning factors. Seventy-nine items were generated using a frequency (never to always) scale. The tool was applied to the University of New South Wales year 2, 3, and 6 medical students. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (exploratory factor analysis [EFA] and confirmatory factor analysis [CFA], respectively) were conducted to establish the tool’s construct validity and goodness of fit, and Cronbach’s α was used for reliability.
Results
In total, 352 students (44.2%) completed the questionnaire. The EFA identified student-centered learning, problem-solving learning, self-directed learning, and visual technology (reliability, 0.77 to 0.89). CFA showed acceptable goodness of fit (chi-square P<0.01, comparative fit index=0.930 and Tucker-Lewis index=0.917, root mean square error of approximation=0.069, standardized root mean square residual=0.06).
Conclusion
The established tool—Student Ratings in Clinical Teaching (STRICT)—is a valid and reliable tool that demonstrates how students perceive clinical teaching efficacy. STRICT measures the frequency of teaching practices to mitigate the biases of acquiescence and social desirability. Clinical teachers may use the tool to adapt their teaching practices with more active learning activities and to utilize visual technology to facilitate clinical learning efficacy. Clinical educators may apply STRICT to assess how these teaching practices are implemented in current clinical settings.
Adequacy of the examination-based licensing system and a training-based licensing system for midwifery license according to changes in childbirth medical infrastructure in Korea: a survey-based descriptive study  
Yun Mi Kim, Sun Hee Lee, Sun Ok Lee, Mi Young An, Bu Youn Kim, Jum Mi Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:15.   Published online May 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.15
  • 1,123 View
  • 62 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The number of Korean midwifery licensing examination applicants has steadily decreased due to the low birth rate and lack of training institutions for midwives. This study aimed to evaluate the adequacy of the examination-based licensing system and the possibility of a training-based licensing system.
Methods
A survey questionnaire was developed and dispatched to 230 professionals from December 28, 2022 to January 13, 2023, through an online form using Google Surveys. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the results.
Results
Responses from 217 persons (94.3%) were analyzed after excluding incomplete responses. Out of the 217 participants, 198 (91.2%) agreed with maintaining the current examination-based licensing system; 94 (43.3%) agreed with implementing a training-based licensing system to cover the examination costs due to the decreasing number of applicants; 132 (60.8%) agreed with establishing a midwifery education evaluation center for a training-based licensing system; 163 (75.1%) said that the quality of midwifery might be lowered if midwives were produced only by a training-based licensing system, and 197 (90.8%) said that the training of midwives as birth support personnel should be promoted in Korea.
Conclusion
Favorable results were reported for the examination-based licensing system; however, if a training-based licensing system is implemented, it will be necessary to establish a midwifery education evaluation center to manage the quality of midwives. As the annual number of candidates for the Korean midwifery licensing examination has been approximately 10 in recent years, it is necessary to consider more actively granting midwifery licenses through a training-based licensing system.
Brief report
Is dental autotransplantation underestimated and underused by Syrian dentists?  
Nuraldeen Maher Al-Khanati, Zafin Kara Beit
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:18.   Published online August 4, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.18
  • 4,955 View
  • 270 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Dental autotransplantation (DAT) is a surgical procedure in which a donor's tooth is extracted and transplanted from one site to another in the same person. This treatment modality has received considerable attention worldwide in recent years due to its potential advantages over implants. A survey-based study evaluated dentists’ attitudes towards and practice of DAT in Damascus, Syria from September to December 2020. We asked respondents whether they considered this treatment modality when developing treatment plans and whether they view it viable. Only 73 of the 258 respondents (28.3%) stated that they considered DAT as a treatment option. Additionally, 153 respondents (59.3%) either did not view DAT as a viable treatment option or did not know whether it is viable. DAT was underestimated and underused among Syrian dentists. Given this gap in real-world knowledge and practice, academic dental institutions in Syria should place a greater focus on emerging evidence-based knowledge and protocols regarding this treatment option.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Can tooth germ show continuous development after autologous transplantation?
    Nuraldeen Maher Al-Khanati, Zafin Kara Beit
    International Journal of Surgery Open.2023; 55: 100617.     CrossRef
  • Auto-Transplantation of Teeth: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study of Knowledge and Attitude
    Lena S Elbadawi, Abdulrahman Al Farhah
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nonextraction Orthodontic Treatment of Severely Impacted Maxillary Canines through Transalveolar Transplantation in a 10-Year-Old Patient: A Case Report with a 6-Year Follow-Up Period
    Jae Hyun Park, Jiyoung Oh, Kooyoung Lim, Alex Hung Kuo Chou, Yoon-Ah Kook, Seong Ho Han
    Applied Sciences.2023; 13(21): 11665.     CrossRef
  • Reconsidering some standards in immediate autotransplantation of teeth: Case report with 2-year follow-up
    Nuraldeen Maher Al-Khanati, Zafin Kara Beit
    Annals of Medicine and Surgery.2022; 75: 103470.     CrossRef
  • Effect of restoration material on marginal bone resorption around modified anatomic zirconia dental implants: A randomised controlled trial
    Alaa Aldebes, Nuraldeen Maher Al-Khanati, Jihad Abou Nassar, Nour Al-Deen Kharboutly, Feras Aldamman
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Should we predict poor prognosis in autotransplantation of teeth with completed root formation?
    Nuraldeen Maher Al-Khanati, Zafin Kara Beit
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unusual Indications of Teeth Transplantation: A Literature Review
    Nuraldeen M Al-Khanati, Ahmad Albassal, Zafin Kara Beit
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research articles
Comparison of the use of manikins and simulated patients in a multidisciplinary in situ medical simulation program for healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom  
Marrit Meerdink, Joshua Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:8.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.8
  • 6,818 View
  • 381 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is increasingly popular in healthcare education, and often relies on specially designed manikins. However, it is also possible to work with actors, or simulated patients (SPs), which may provide a greater sense of realism. This study aimed to compare these 2 approaches, to ascertain which makes healthcare professionals feel most comfortable, which leads to the greatest improvement in confidence, and which is most beneficial to learning.
Methods
This study was embedded in a pre-existing multidisciplinary in situ simulation program. A multidisciplinary group of learners from a range of backgrounds—including nurses, doctors, and other allied health professionals—were asked to complete a questionnaire about their learning preferences. We collected 204 responses from 40 simulation sessions over 4 months, from September to December 2019. Of these 204 responses, 123 described using an SP and 81 described using a manikin.
Results
We found that 58% of respondents believed they would feel more comfortable working with an actor, while 17% would feel more comfortable using a manikin. Learners who used both modalities reported a significant increase in confidence (P<0.0001 for both). Participants felt that both modalities were beneficial to learning, but SPs provided significantly more benefits to learning than manikins (P<0.0001). The most common reason favoring SP-based simulation was the greater realism.
Conclusion
In scenarios that could reasonably be provided using either modality, we suggest that educators should give greater consideration to using SP-based simulation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Communication and swallowing training of stroke‐specialized health professionals using transdisciplinary knowledge in a patient–actor scenario: A case report
    Maria da Assunção Coelho de Matos, Ana Rita Pinheiro, Isabel Maria Monteiro da Costa, Joaquim Alvarelhão
    International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.2024; 59(2): 798.     CrossRef
  • Learning outcomes and cost-utility analysis of hybrid patient and mannequin-based simulation
    Juana Perpiñá-Galvañ, Silvia Satorra-Rodríguez, Ana Isabel Gutiérrez-García, Noelia García-Aracil, Lourdes José-Alcaide, Néstor Montoro-Pérez, Rocío Juliá-Sanchís
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 132: 106003.     CrossRef
  • Promoting Knowledge of Metered Dose Inhaler (MDI) Usage Among Pharmacy Professional Students through A Mobile App
    Muhammad Thesa Ghozali, Tasya Aulia Mutiara
    Journal of Asthma.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Optimizing Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) to Maximize Readiness
    Joseph R Danford, Florencio Reyes, Jennifer M Gurney, Joshua P Smith, Daniel J Stinner
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What is the impact of simulation‐based training for paediatric procedures on patient outcomes, cost and latent safety threats?
    Samuel E. Graef, Nima Karimi, Maggie Xu, Jo‐Anne Petropoulos, Quang N. Ngo, Elif Bilgic
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Standardized Patients Versus Mannequins in Mental Health Simulation
    Rebecca Luebbert, Amelia Perez, Angela Andrews, Tracy Webster-Cooley
    Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.2023; 29(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Use of an in-house-developed, 3D-printed mannequin for emergency medicine training among medical students
    Zulvikar Syambani Ulhaq, Ferry Nur Nasyroh, Achmad Arief Hidayatullah, Christyaji Indradmojo, Amalia Nur Aisa, Gita Vita Soraya
    Educación Médica.2023; 24(6): 100848.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Simulation on Nursing Student Perceptions of Readiness to Provide End-of-Life Care
    Rebecca Dias, Kathryn Robinson, Patricia Poirier
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2023; 25(6): E116.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of a Simulation-Based Learning Activity Using Actor Patients on Final Year Nursing Students’ Learning
    Dianne Marshall, Michelle Honey
    Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse in Medical Education
    Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Ferdiansyah Sultan Ayasasmita Rusdhy, Prasandhya Astagiri Yusuf
    Medical Journal of Indonesia.2023; 32(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • In situ simulation and its different applications in healthcare: an integrative review
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Simulação in situ e suas diferentes aplicações na área da saúde: uma revisão integrativa
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception of Realism and Acquisition of Clinical Skills in Simulated Pediatric Dentistry Scenarios
    Begoña Bartolomé Villar, Irene Real Benlloch, Ana De la Hoz Calvo, Gleyvis Coro-Montanet
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11387.     CrossRef
  • Just-in-Time Orientation of Non-Critical Care Nurses to the Critical Care Environment
    Meghan Doelger, Karen Kesten, Bonnie Sakallaris
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2022; 53(10): 465.     CrossRef
  • Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
    Matthew Bradley
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 21.     CrossRef
  • A manikin or human simulator—development of a tool for measuring students’ perception
    Kamil Torres, Phillip Evans, Izabela Mamcarz, Natalia Radczuk, Anna Torres
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e14214.     CrossRef
Perception of clinical educational environment by student of physiotherapy based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile  
Karen Córdova-León, Lincoyán Fernández-Huerta, Marcela Rojas-Vargas
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:16.   Published online June 14, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.16
  • 18,248 View
  • 271 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aimed at describing the perception of the clinical educational environment by physiotherapy students based on the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measurement Questionnaire in Chile.
Methods
The clinical education environment was evaluated according to the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) by 192 students originally enrolled in the fifth year of the physiotherapy career at 3 different headquarters of the academic institution: Santiago, Viña del Mar, and Concepcion Campus (Metropolitan, Valparaiso, and Bio Bio region, respectively), from March to October 2018. The Cronbach’s α was applied to measure the reliability of the instrument and the Student-t and analysis of variance tests were used to compare the differences of PHEEM scores by headquarters, environmental areas, and experience of internship.
Results
A total overall average score of 125.88 was obtained, which meant an excellent educational environment. The overall score was 127.6±22.7 for headquarters 1, 125.6±21.6 for headquarters 2, and 122.5±26.9 for headquarters 3. According to the type of establishment, the scores were of 127.1±22.1 for private and 123.5±26.3 for public institutes. According to the type of area, the score was cataloged as an excellent educational environment in all cases, except in the respiratory care area (lowest score, 117.5±29.1). Finally, the score was 126.9±20.5 for the first internship, 121.7±29.3 for the second, and 129.4±19.6 for the third.
Conclusion
There is relative homogeneity of the clinical educational environment for different headquarters, types of establishment, or type of area; but there are significant differences in the number of the internship. The promotion of a good clinical educational environment can have an important impact on the development and performance of the future professional, being the detection of negative aspects an opportunity to improve the hidden curriculum.

Citations

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  • KNOWLEDGE OF PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS ABOUT SUPERVISION SKILLS DURING THE CLINICAL ROTATION OF INTERNSHIP
    Dr. Tabish Fahim, Dr. Shadab Uddin
    Pakistan Journal of Rehabilitation.2021; 10(2): 31.     CrossRef
  • Moroccan residents’ perceptions of the hospital learning environment measured with the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure
    Hajar Berrani, Redouane Abouqal, Amal Thimou Izgua
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 4.     CrossRef
  • Measuring the impact of oceanographic indices on species distribution shifts: The spatially varying effect of cold‐pool extent in the eastern Bering Sea
    James T. Thorson
    Limnology and Oceanography.2019; 64(6): 2632.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors predictive of performance in a doctor of physical therapy program in the United States  
Maureen Conard, Kristin Schweizer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:34.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.34
  • 18,941 View
  • 255 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to conduct a personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors that may predict successful performance or performance difficulties in doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students. The study employed focus groups and a survey with 9 DPT subject matter experts. The focus group participants, who included 3 DPT faculty members and 4 recent graduates of the DPT program, identified 22 non-cognitive factors. Fifteen of these factors were thought to be possibly associated with successful performance and 7 factors were thought to be possibly associated with performance difficulties. Administration of a questionnaire employing the combination job analysis method resulted in 12 factors that could be used in selection, and 10 that could be incorporated into training. The present study employed an established job analysis method using subject matter experts to identify a broad array of factors that go beyond what previous studies have examined, and which may predict success or difficulties in a DPT program.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Variables Used in Physical Therapist Education Program Admissions Part 2: Noncognitive Variables
    Andrea N. Bowens
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review
    Kelly Reynolds, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, Maggie Horn
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 31.     CrossRef
Research articles
Clinical empathy in medical students in India measured using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy–Student Version  
Anirban Chatterjee, Rajkrishna Ravikumar, Satendra Singh, Pranjal Singh Chauhan, Manu Goel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:33.   Published online December 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.33
  • 33,496 View
  • 452 Download
  • 39 Web of Science
  • 35 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical empathy of a cohort of medical students spanning 4 years of undergraduate study and to identify factors associated with empathy.
Methods
A cross-sectional study to assess the empathy of undergraduate medical students at the University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital in Delhi, India, was conducted using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy–Student Version. Demographic data were obtained using a pre-tested, semi-open-ended questionnaire.
Results
Of the 600 students, 418 participated in the survey (69.7%). The mean empathy score was 96.01 (of a maximum of 140), with a standard deviation of 14.56. The empathy scores decreased from the first to the third semester, plateaued at the fifth semester, and rose again in the seventh semester. Empathy was found to be significantly associated with the gender of the participant, with females having higher scores (P<0.001). The age of the participant, place of residence, whose decision it was for the student to enroll in an MBBS (bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery) program, and the choice of future specialty were not significantly associated with students’ empathy scores.
Conclusion
The study found significant gender differences in empathy among the participants. The empathy scores tended to decline initially and then rebound over time. The mean empathy levels found in this study are lower than those reported in most similar studies around the world; therefore, further studies are needed to analyze and address the underlying factors associated with this discrepancy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Level of Empathy Among Medical Students at the University of Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
    Omnia S El Seifi, Amal A Alenazi, Asmaa M Alfuhaymani, Alshaymaa A Alanazi, Omayrah A Alanazi, Lama A Alanazi, Nouf M Albalawi, Fatima S Alharbi, Dhuha A ALQasir
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    Aynur ERÇEK KARCI, Selma ŞEN
    İzmir Katip Çelebi Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Fakültesi Dergisi.2024; 9(1): 19.     CrossRef
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    David Ortiz-Paredes, Peterson Adam Henet, Martin Desseilles, Charo Rodríguez
    Medical Teacher.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
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    Sukhmanjit S Brar, Revadi G, Ankur Joshi, Abhijit R Rozatkar, Ehsaas Bajaj, Abhijit P Pakhare
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    Hao Chen, Hanwen Xuan, Jinquan Cai, Meichen Liu, Lei Shi
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Gayatri Bhatia, Jyoti V. Shetty
    Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine.2023; 45(2): 162.     CrossRef
  • Eleven years of data on the Jefferson Scale of Empathy – medical student version: Japanese norm data and tentative cutoff scores
    Hitomi U. Kataoka, Akiko Tokinobu, Chikako Fujii, Mayu Watanabe, Mikako Obika
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hsiang-Chin Hsu, Tzu-Ching Sung
    Sustainability.2023; 15(9): 7631.     CrossRef
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    Kritika Tiwari, Neeraj Agarwal, Sanjay Pandey
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factor structure of the Jefferson Scale for Empathy among medical undergraduates from South India
    Samir Kumar Praharaj, Santosh Salagre, Podila Sathya Venkata Narasimha Sharma
    Indian Journal of Psychiatry.2023; 65(7): 755.     CrossRef
  • Empathy levels among undergraduate medical students in Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study
    Masooma Naseem, Burhanuddin Tahir, Afia Salman, Sara Qadir, Rida Farhan, Sajjad Ali, Zehra Naseem, Warda Ahmed, Mahfuza Anan
    Annals of Medicine & Surgery.2023; 85(8): 3858.     CrossRef
  • Perceived leadership quality and empathy among Indian undergraduate medical students
    Himel Mondal, Sachin Soni, ManasRanjan Sahoo, Shaikat Mondal, Koushik Saha, Biswajit Maharana, Bhagyajyoti Priyadarshini, JoshilKumar Behera
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2023; 12(1): 321.     CrossRef
  • The integrated curriculum and student empathy: a longitudinal multi-cohort analysis
    Christiane R. Herber-Valdez, Julie A. Blow, Tammy T. Salazar, Kathryn V. Horn, Dyanne G. Herrera, Naomi L. Lacy, Lisa Beinhoff, J. Manuel de la Rosa
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Rules, Responsibility, and Empathy in Maternity Hospitals: A Qualitative Study in Iran
    Zahra Shahvari, Parastou Yousefali, Reihaneh Firoozikhojastefar
    Iranian Journal of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Hyoung Seok Shin, Hyunmi Park, Young-Mee Lee
    Patient Education and Counseling.2022; 105(2): 432.     CrossRef
  • Empathy, personality traits, and emotional management in 2nd and 4th-year dentistry students: a single-center study
    Christian Lermen, Willi Wetzel, Vanessa Britz, Jasmina Sterz, Wolf O Bechstein, Teresa Schreckenbach
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A quantitative evaluation of empathy using JSE-S Tool, before and after a Medical Humanities Module, amongst first-year medical students in Nepal
    Krishna Bahadur G. C., Amit Arjyal, Amanda Helen Douglas, Madhusudan Subedi, Rajesh Gongal
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Reliability of Greek version of the Toronto empathy questionnaire in medical students and associations with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors
    Polychronis Voultsos, Fotios Chatzinikolaou, Angeliki Papana, Aspasia Deliligka
    BMC Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of Perfectionism and Resilience on Empathy in Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Wardah Rafaqat, Ashmal Sami, Muhammad Talal Ibrahim, Hamza Ibad, Sheharbano Awais, Ayesha Memon, Fatima Farrukh Shahbaz, Daniyaal Ahmed, Shahzaib Zindani, Abdul Lateef Leghari, Sarah Saleem
    Journal of Patient Experience.2022; 9: 237437352211066.     CrossRef
  • Humanitarian approach in medicine: A study on clinical empathy among medical students and graduates using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy
    VEDI NEERAJ, PUJA DULLOO, DEEPAK SHARMA, PRAVEEN SINGH
    The National Medical Journal of India.2022; 35: 100.     CrossRef
  • Project DABE: Empathy among Spanish Medical Students
    Joaquín García-Estañ, Diego Flores-Funes, Patricia Capdevila-Gaudens, J. Miguel García-Abajo, Mila García-Barbero
    Educación Médica.2022; 23(6): 100769.     CrossRef
  • Measurement of empathy among health professionals during Syrian crisis using the Syrian empathy scale
    Mayssoon Dashash, Mounzer Boubou
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stigma, Empathy, and Attitude (SEA) educational module for medical students to improve the knowledge and attitude towards persons with mental illness
    Samir Kumar Praharaj, Santosh Salagre, Podila S.V.N. Sharma
    Asian Journal of Psychiatry.2021; 65: 102834.     CrossRef
  • Awareness, Knowledge, Attitude and Empathy Levels of Dental Postgraduates Towards Their Patients During Practice and Research—A Questionnaire Based Survey
    P Mohan Kumar, D Praveen, G Praveen, P Arun Bhupathi, M Ravi Kanth, KS Uloopi
    Journal of Patient Experience.2021; 8: 237437352110565.     CrossRef
  • Civic-Mindedness Sustains Empathy in a Cohort of Physical Therapy Students: A Pilot Cohort Study
    Kerstin M Palombaro, Jill D Black, Robin L Dole, Sidney A Jones, Alexander R Stewart
    Journal of Patient Experience.2020; 7(2): 185.     CrossRef
  • Revisiting the trajectory of medical students’ empathy, and impact of gender, specialty preferences and nationality: a systematic review
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    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2020; 7: 238212052094065.     CrossRef
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    Elize Archer, Roseanne Turner
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Perception survey on the introduction of clinical performance examination as part of the national nursing licensing examination in Korea  
Su Jin Shin, Yeong Kyeong Kim, Soon-Rim Suh, Duk Yoo Jung, Yunju Kim, Mi Kyoung Yim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:26.   Published online October 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.26
  • 31,979 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to analyze opinions about the action plan for implementation of clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing examination and presents the expected effects of the performance exam and aspects to consider regarding its implementation.
Methods
This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative data were collected by a questionnaire survey, while qualitative data were collected by focus group interviews with experts. The survey targeted 200 nursing professors and clinical nurses with more than 5 years of work experience, and the focus group interviews were conducted with 28 of professors, clinical instructors, and nurses at hospitals.
Results
First, nursing professors and clinical specialists agreed that the current written tests have limitations in evaluating examinees’ ability, and that the introduction of a clinical performance exam will yield positive results. Clinical performance exam is necessary to evaluate and improve nurses’ work ability, which means that the implementation of a performance exam is advisable if its credibility and validity can be verified. Second, most respondents chose direct performance exams using simulators or standardized patients as the most suitable format of the test.
Conclusion
In conclusion, the current national nursing licensing exam is somewhat limited in its ability to identify competent nurses. Thus, the time has come for us to seriously consider the introduction of a performance exam. The prerequisites for successfully implementing clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing exam are a professional training process and forming a consortium to standardize practical training.

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    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
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Current issues and areas for improvement in the Korean Dental Hygienist National Licensing Examination: an expert Delphi survey among dental hygienists  
Yoon-Sook Hwang, Hyun-Sook Kang, Soo-Hwa Kim, Hee-Jung Moon, Sun-Mi Lee, Jae-Yeon Jung, Su-Jeong Hwang, Jung-Eun Ha
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:21.   Published online September 13, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.21
  • 28,462 View
  • 246 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to investigate current issues and areas for improvement in the Korean Dental Hygienist National Licensing Examination (KDHNLE) through an expert Delphi survey.
Methods
A Delphi survey was conducted from May through August 2016 in Korea. This Delphi survey included 20 persons representing the field of dental hygiene (7 groups from various dental hygiene-related organizations). The Delphi survey was administered through e-mail as 3 rounds of questionnaire surveys regarding the issues facing the KDHNLE and potential solutions to those challenges. The primary Delphi survey was an open questionnaire. In each round, subjects’ responses were categorized according to the detailed themes of their responses. The minimum value of the content validity ratio of the survey results was determined by the number of panels participating in the Delphi survey.
Results
Issues facing the KDHNLE were identified from the results of the Delphi survey. The following 4 items had an average importance score of 4.0 or higher and were considered as important by over 85% of the panels: the failure of the practical test to reflect actual clinical settings, the focus of the practical test on dental scaling, the gap between the items evaluated on the national examination and actual practical work, and insufficiency in strengthening the expertise of licensed dental hygienists. The following items were suggested for improvement: more rigorous rater training, adjustment of the difficulty of the licensing examination, the introduction of a specialized dental hygienist system, and more rigorous refresher training for licensed dental hygienists.
Conclusion
Based on the above results, the KDHNLE should be improved according to the core competencies of dental hygienists, including on-site clinical practice experience.
Development of the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire in the United States  
Michelle E. Wormley, Wendy Romney, Anna E. Greer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:14.   Published online June 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.14
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  • 385 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to develop a valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness within the field of physical therapy.
Methods
The Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire (CTEQ) was developed via a 4-stage process, including (1) initial content development, (2) content analysis with 8 clinical instructors with over 5 years of clinical teaching experience, (3) pilot testing with 205 clinical instructors from 2 universities in the Northeast of the United States, and (4) psychometric evaluation, including principal component analysis.
Results
The scale development process resulted in a 30-item questionnaire with 4 sections that relate to clinical teaching: learning experiences, learning environment, communication, and evaluation.
Conclusion
The CTEQ provides a preliminary valid measure for assessing clinical teaching effectiveness in physical therapy practice.

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Attitudes to proposed assessment of pharmacy skills in Korean pharmacist licensure examination  
Joo Hee Kim, Ju-Yeun Lee, Young Sook Lee, Chul-Soon Yong, Nayoung Han, Hye Sun Gwak, Jungmi Oh, Byung Koo Lee, Sukhyang Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:6.   Published online March 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.6
  • 47,129 View
  • 375 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The survey aimed to obtain opinions about a proposed implementation of pharmacy skills assessment in Korean pharmacist licensure examination (KPLE).
Methods
A 16-question survey was distributed electronically to 2,738 people including 570 pharmacy professors of 35 pharmacy schools, 550 preceptors from 865 practice sites and 1,618 students who graduated in 2015. The survey solicited responses concerning the adequacy of the current KPLE in assessing pharmacy knowledge/skills/attitudes, deficiencies of pharmacy skills testing in assessing the professional competencies necessary for pharmacists, plans for pharmacy skills tests in the current KPLE, and subject areas of pharmacy practice.
Results
A total of 466 surveys were returned. The current exam is not adequate for assessing skills and attitudes according to 42%–48% of respondents. Sixty percent felt that skills test is necessary to assess qualifications and professional competencies. Almost two-thirds of participants stated that testing should be implemented within 5 years. More than 60% agreed that candidates should be graduates and that written and skills test scores can be combined for pass-fail decisions. About 70% of respondents felt that the test should be less than 2 hours in duration. Over half of the respondents thought that the assessor should be a pharmacy faculty member with at least 5 years of clinical experience. Up to 70% stated that activities related to patient care were appropriate and practical for the scope of skills test.
Conclusion
Pharmacy skills assessment was supported by the majority of respondents.

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Research Articles
Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy  
Mohsen Adib-Hajbaghery, Mona Faraji
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:29.   Published online July 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.29
  • 28,020 View
  • 316 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. Methods: A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students’ attitude and practice were assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Results: Before the intervention, no significant differences were found between the group designated to group discussion and those designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students’ practice score was increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Both methods were effective on the students’ attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students’ attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

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  • Instructional guidelines and group discussion effects on new nurses’ competency regarding nursing care of preterm infants
    Abdulaziz Asiri, Faransa A. Ahmed, Abeer A. Almowafy, Rasha A. Mohamed, Wael G. Nouh, Aml S. Abdelrahem, Rehab H. Kafl, Manal F. Mohamed, Shimaa M. Moursy
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  • Pendidikan Kesehatan Menggunakan Metode Buzz Group Discussion di TK
    Sartini Risky, Erwin Azizi Jayadipraja, Lodes Hadju, Lisnawati Lisnawati
    Jurnal Obsesi : Jurnal Pendidikan Anak Usia Dini.2022; 6(6): 5782.     CrossRef
  • Observation of Patients’ Privacy by Physicians and Nurses and Its Relationship with Patient Satisfaction
    Rahim Baghaei, Somaieh Razmara Iranagh, Nazafarin Ghasemzadeh, Yaser Moradi
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  • HEMŞİRELİK ÖĞRENCİLERİNİN HASTA MAHREMİYETİNİ KORUMAYA YÖNELİK DAVRANIŞLARININ BELİRLENMESİ
    Zeynep KIZILCIK ÖZKAN, Semra ÇİL EYİ, Zeliha MAYDA
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2020; 8(2): 312.     CrossRef
Construct validity test of evaluation tool for professional behaviors of entry-level occupational therapy students in the United States  
Hon K. Yuen, Andres Azuero, Kaitlin W. Lackey, Nicole S. Brown, Sangita Shrestha
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:22.   Published online June 1, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.22
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to test the construct validity of an instrument to measure student professional behaviors in entry-level occupational therapy (OT) students in the academic setting. Methods: A total of 718 students from 37 OT programs across the United States answered a self-assessment survey of professional behavior that we developed. The survey consisted of ranking 28 attributes, each on a 5-point Likert scale. A split-sample approach was used for exploratory and then confirmatory factor analysis. Results: A three-factor solution with nine items was extracted using exploratory factor analysis [EFA] (n=430, 60%). The factors were ‘Commitment to Learning’ (2 items), ‘Skills for Learning’ (4 items), and ‘Cultural Competence’ (3 items). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the validation split (n=288, 40%) indicated fair fit for this three-factor model (fit indices: CFI=0.96, RMSEA=0.06, and SRMR=0.05). Internal consistency reliability estimates of each factor and the instrument ranged from 0.63 to 0.79. Conclusion: Results of the CFA in a separate validation dataset provided robust measures of goodness-of-fit for the three-factor solution developed in the EFA, and indicated that the three-factor model fitted the data well enough. Therefore, we can conclude that this student professional behavior evaluation instrument is a structurally validated tool to measure professional behaviors reported by entry-level OT students. The internal consistency reliability of each individual factor and the whole instrument was considered to be adequate to good.

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  • Mesleki Davranış Anketinin Türkçe Geçerlilik ve Güvenilirliği
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Brief Report
Medical students’ perception of the proposal for theme-based integrated multi-disciplinary objective structured practical examination in Saudi Arabia  
Mohammad Saleh Hassan, Amel Yacoubi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:15.   Published online March 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.15
  • 35,234 View
  • 187 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to find the opinion of preclinical medical students concerning a new suggested approach for practical assessment. Fifty-three female students agreed to participate in this study, out of 87 registered students in years 2 and 3 of the basic science phase of the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Full explanation was made to the students of theme-based integrated objective structured practical examination (TBI-OSPE), followed by distribution of a questionnaire to collect the students’ opinions. The study was conducted in January 2015. Results showed that 78% of respondents were accepting of this new approach, and that only 5.7% rejected it. This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). This study suggested a new model for assessment of preclinical students’ competencies using the proposed tool (TBI-OSPE) rather than standard classical OSPE, particularly in curricula involving high levels of integration and theme-based problems. This form of assessment would more positively enhance learning.

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  • Standard-Setting of Multidisciplinary Objective Structured Practical Examination
    Sherif M Zaki, Amira S Ismail
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    Amira Salem Alsagheer, Mohamed Soliman Ali
    Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health.2022; : 109.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions