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Research articles
Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study  
Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:25.   Published online September 2, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.25
  • 3,426 View
  • 237 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization are essential procedures in clinical practice. Simulation-based technology such as smart glasses has been used to facilitate medical students’ training on these procedures. We investigated medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction regarding the practice and training of these procedures with smart glasses in Taiwan.
Methods
This observational study enrolled 145 medical students in the 5th and 6th years participating in clerkships at Taipei Veterans General Hospital between October 2020 and December 2021. Students were divided into the smart glasses or the control group and received training at a workshop. The primary outcomes included students’ pre- and post-intervention scores for self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with the training tool, instructor’s teaching, and the workshop.
Results
The pre-intervention scores for self-assessed efficacy of 5th- and 6th-year medical students in endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization procedures showed no significant difference. The post-intervention score of self-assessed efficacy in the smart glasses group was better than that of the control group. Moreover, 6th-year medical students in the smart glasses group showed higher satisfaction with the training tool, instructor’s teaching, and workshop than those in the control group.
Conclusion
Smart glasses served as a suitable simulation tool for endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization procedures training in medical students. Medical students practicing with smart glasses showed improved self-assessed efficacy and higher satisfaction with training, especially for procedural steps in a space-limited field. Simulation training on procedural skills with smart glasses in 5th-year medical students may be adjusted to improve their satisfaction.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The use of smart glasses in nursing education: A scoping review
    Charlotte Romare, Lisa Skär
    Nurse Education in Practice.2023; 73: 103824.     CrossRef
Simulation-based training using a novel Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration to improve abdominal hysterectomy skills of obstetrics and gynecology residents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia: a pre- and post-intervention study  
Dara Dasawulansari Syamsuri, Brahmana Askandar Tjokroprawiro, Eighty Mardiyan Kurniawati, Budi Utomo, Djoko Kuswanto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:11.   Published online May 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.11
  • 6,026 View
  • 312 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures decreased in Indonesia. The existing commercial abdominal hysterectomy simulation model is expensive and difficult to reuse. This study compared residents’ abdominal hysterectomy skills after simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following a video demonstration.
Methods
We randomized 3rd- and 4th-year obstetrics and gynecology residents to a video-based group (group 1), a simulation-based group (group 2), and a combination group (group 3). Abdominal hysterectomy skills were compared between before and after the educational intervention. The pre- and post-tests were scored by blinded experts using the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Global Rating Scale (GRS).
Results
A total of 33 residents were included in the pre- and post-tests. The OSATS and GRS mean differences after the intervention were higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (OSATS: 4.64 [95% CI, 2.90–6.37] vs. 2.55 [95% CI, 2.19–2.90] vs. 3.82 [95% CI, 2.41–5.22], P=0.047; GRS: 10.00 [95% CI, 7.01–12.99] vs. 5.18 [95% CI, 3.99–6.38] vs. 7.18 [95% CI, 6.11–8.26], P=0.006). The 3rd-year residents in group 3 had greater mean differences in OSATS and GRS scores than the 4th-year residents (OSATS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.88–8.46]; GRS: 12.83 [95% CI, 8.61–17.05] vs. OSATS: 3.40 [95% CI, 0.83–5.97]; GRS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.80–8.54]).
Conclusion
Simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration can be a bridge to learning about abdominal hysterectomy for residents who had less surgical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Improving the quality of care and patient safety in oncology, the contribution of simulation-based training: A scoping review
    Nadia Al Wachami, Mohamed Chahboune, Ibtissam Youlyouz-marfak, Mohamed Reda Mesradi, Hajar Lemriss, Abderraouf Hilali
    International Journal of Nursing Sciences.2024; 11(2): 187.     CrossRef
  • Effect of midwife competence training in primary healthcare facilities on obstetric risk early detection
    Ai Nur Zannah, Yuningsih Yuningsih, Asri Iman Sari, Eka Afdi Septiyono
    Healthcare in Low-resource Settings.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in gynecologic simulation: implementation, validity, and new resources
    Kathryn Edmonds, Steve Warner, Scott Endicott
    Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology.2024; 36(4): 296.     CrossRef
Comparison of the use of manikins and simulated patients in a multidisciplinary in situ medical simulation program for healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom  
Marrit Meerdink, Joshua Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:8.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.8
  • 6,998 View
  • 386 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is increasingly popular in healthcare education, and often relies on specially designed manikins. However, it is also possible to work with actors, or simulated patients (SPs), which may provide a greater sense of realism. This study aimed to compare these 2 approaches, to ascertain which makes healthcare professionals feel most comfortable, which leads to the greatest improvement in confidence, and which is most beneficial to learning.
Methods
This study was embedded in a pre-existing multidisciplinary in situ simulation program. A multidisciplinary group of learners from a range of backgrounds—including nurses, doctors, and other allied health professionals—were asked to complete a questionnaire about their learning preferences. We collected 204 responses from 40 simulation sessions over 4 months, from September to December 2019. Of these 204 responses, 123 described using an SP and 81 described using a manikin.
Results
We found that 58% of respondents believed they would feel more comfortable working with an actor, while 17% would feel more comfortable using a manikin. Learners who used both modalities reported a significant increase in confidence (P<0.0001 for both). Participants felt that both modalities were beneficial to learning, but SPs provided significantly more benefits to learning than manikins (P<0.0001). The most common reason favoring SP-based simulation was the greater realism.
Conclusion
In scenarios that could reasonably be provided using either modality, we suggest that educators should give greater consideration to using SP-based simulation.

Citations

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  • Communication and swallowing training of stroke‐specialized health professionals using transdisciplinary knowledge in a patient–actor scenario: A case report
    Maria da Assunção Coelho de Matos, Ana Rita Pinheiro, Isabel Maria Monteiro da Costa, Joaquim Alvarelhão
    International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.2024; 59(2): 798.     CrossRef
  • Learning outcomes and cost-utility analysis of hybrid patient and mannequin-based simulation
    Juana Perpiñá-Galvañ, Silvia Satorra-Rodríguez, Ana Isabel Gutiérrez-García, Noelia García-Aracil, Lourdes José-Alcaide, Néstor Montoro-Pérez, Rocío Juliá-Sanchís
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 132: 106003.     CrossRef
  • Promoting knowledge of metered dose inhaler (MDI) usage among pharmacy professional students through a mobile app
    Muhammad Thesa Ghozali, Tasya Aulia Mutiara
    Journal of Asthma.2024; 61(8): 835.     CrossRef
  • Optimizing Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) to Maximize Readiness
    Joseph R Danford, Florencio Reyes, Jennifer M Gurney, Joshua P Smith, Daniel J Stinner
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What is the impact of simulation‐based training for paediatric procedures on patient outcomes, cost and latent safety threats?
    Samuel E. Graef, Nima Karimi, Maggie Xu, Jo‐Anne Petropoulos, Quang N. Ngo, Elif Bilgic
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Standardized Patients Versus Mannequins in Mental Health Simulation
    Rebecca Luebbert, Amelia Perez, Angela Andrews, Tracy Webster-Cooley
    Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.2023; 29(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Use of an in-house-developed, 3D-printed mannequin for emergency medicine training among medical students
    Zulvikar Syambani Ulhaq, Ferry Nur Nasyroh, Achmad Arief Hidayatullah, Christyaji Indradmojo, Amalia Nur Aisa, Gita Vita Soraya
    Educación Médica.2023; 24(6): 100848.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Simulation on Nursing Student Perceptions of Readiness to Provide End-of-Life Care
    Rebecca Dias, Kathryn Robinson, Patricia Poirier
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2023; 25(6): E116.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of a Simulation-Based Learning Activity Using Actor Patients on Final Year Nursing Students’ Learning
    Dianne Marshall, Michelle Honey
    Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse in Medical Education
    Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Ferdiansyah Sultan Ayasasmita Rusdhy, Prasandhya Astagiri Yusuf
    Medical Journal of Indonesia.2023; 32(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • In situ simulation and its different applications in healthcare: an integrative review
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Simulação in situ e suas diferentes aplicações na área da saúde: uma revisão integrativa
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception of Realism and Acquisition of Clinical Skills in Simulated Pediatric Dentistry Scenarios
    Begoña Bartolomé Villar, Irene Real Benlloch, Ana De la Hoz Calvo, Gleyvis Coro-Montanet
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11387.     CrossRef
  • Just-in-Time Orientation of Non-Critical Care Nurses to the Critical Care Environment
    Meghan Doelger, Karen Kesten, Bonnie Sakallaris
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2022; 53(10): 465.     CrossRef
  • Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
    Matthew Bradley
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 21.     CrossRef
  • A manikin or human simulator—development of a tool for measuring students’ perception
    Kamil Torres, Phillip Evans, Izabela Mamcarz, Natalia Radczuk, Anna Torres
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e14214.     CrossRef
Brief report
Impact of multi-professional simulation-based training on perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 patients in Pakistan  
Jamal Azfar Khan, Muhammad Rizwan Bashir Kiani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:19.   Published online June 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.19
  • 6,784 View
  • 215 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to evaluate perceptions of safety and preparedness among health workers caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients before and after a multi-professional simulation-based course in Pakistan. Health workers’ perceptions of preparedness, safety, and their willingness to care for COVID-19 patients were measured before and after they attended a simulation-based training course to prepare them to care for COVID-19 patients at Combined Military Hospital Landi Kotal Cantt, from March 1 to April 30, 2020. The participants’ perceived level of safety and preparedness to care for COVID-19 patients before the simulation-based course was low, but increased after completing it (P<0.05). They felt confident and were significantly more willing to care for patients with COVID-19 or other infections requiring strict isolation. Simulation-based training is an effective tool to improve perceptions of risk and readiness to deal with COVID-19 among medical and non-medical health workers in Pakistan.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Investigating the barriers to sustainable higher education in the post pandemic environment
    Saleha Ansari, Abdul Waheed
    Education and Information Technologies.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health Care Simulation as a Training Tool for Epidemic Management
    Marcia A. Corvetto, Fernando R. Altermatt, Francisca Belmar, Eliana Escudero
    Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.2023; 18(6): 382.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting the Preparedness to Care for Patients with Highly Infectious Diseases among Nursing Staff in Long-term Care Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study
    Ye Seul Lee, Min Hye Lee
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2023; 35(1): 35.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Simulation-Based Education for Caring Patients with COVID-19
    Min Hye Lee, Eun-Young Noh
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2023; 53(4): 397.     CrossRef
  • Education and Training Adaptations for Health Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Scoping Review of Lessons Learned and Innovations
    Perla Boutros, Nour Kassem, Jessica Nieder, Catalina Jaramillo, Jakob von Petersdorff, Fiona J. Walsh, Till Bärnighausen, Sandra Barteit
    Healthcare.2023; 11(21): 2902.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Pandemic Support Programs for Healthcare Workers and Implications for Occupational Mental Health: A Narrative Review
    Eden David, Jonathan M. DePierro, Deborah B. Marin, Vanshdeep Sharma, Dennis S. Charney, Craig L. Katz
    Psychiatric Quarterly.2022; 93(1): 227.     CrossRef
  • How stressful was the COVID-19 pandemic for residents specializing in family practice?. A study of stressors and psychological well-being of physicians in further training specializing in family practice (GP trainees) within a pandemic context
    Anna-Maria von Oltersdorff-Kalettka, Janina Meinel, Karen Voigt, Thomas Mundt, Markus Bleckwenn, Antje Bergmann, Mandy Gottschall
    BMC Primary Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An update on developments in medical education in response to the COVID-19 pandemic: A BEME scoping review: BEME Guide No. 64
    Michelle Daniel, Morris Gordon, Madalena Patricio, Ahmad Hider, Cameron Pawlik, Rhea Bhagdev, Shoaib Ahmad, Sebastian Alston, Sophie Park, Teresa Pawlikowska, Eliot Rees, Andrea Jane Doyle, Mohan Pammi, Satid Thammasitboon, Mary Haas, William Peterson, Ma
    Medical Teacher.2021; 43(3): 253.     CrossRef
  • Training in healthcare during and after COVID-19: proposal for simulation training
    Carolina Felipe Soares Brandão, Ellen Cristina Bergamasco, Gabriela Furst Vaccarezza, Maria Luiza Ferreira de Barba, Enrico Ferreira Martins de Andrade, Dario Cecilio-Fernandes
    Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira.2021; 67( suppl 1): 12.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Critical Care Simulations: An International Cross-Sectional Survey
    Mohamad-Hani Temsah, Abdulkarim Alrabiaah, Ayman Al-Eyadhy, Fahad Al-Sohime, Abdullah Al Huzaimi, Nurah Alamro, Khalid Alhasan, Vaibhavi Upadhye, Amr Jamal, Fadi Aljamaan, Ali Alhaboob, Yaseen M. Arabi, Marc Lazarovici, Ali M. Somily, Abdulaziz M. Boker
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    Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Simulation-Based Education on the Preparedness of Healthcare Professionals for the COVID-19 Pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Marc-André Maheu-Cadotte, Alexandra Lapierre, Guillaume Fontaine, Tanya Mailhot, Patrick Lavoie
    Science of Nursing and Health Practices.2021; 4(1): 1.     CrossRef
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Research Article
Randomized study of effectiveness of computerized ultrasound simulators for an introductory course for residents in Brazil  
Jack Philip Silva, Trevor Plescia, Nathan Molina, Ana Claudia de Oliveira Tonelli, Mark Langdorf, John Christian Fox
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:16.   Published online April 4, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.16
  • 43,171 View
  • 194 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the impact of ultrasound simulation (SonoSim) on educational outcomes of an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course compared to hands-on training with live models alone. Methods: Fifty-three internal medicine residents without ultrasound experience were randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. They participated in an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course covering eight topics in eight sessions from June 23, 2014 until July 18, 2014. Both participated in lecture and hands-on training, but experimental group received an hour of computerized simulator training instead of a second hour of hands-on training. We assessed clinical knowledge and image acquisition with written multiple-choice and practical exams, respectively. Of the 53 enrolled, 40 participants (75.5%) completed the course and all testing. Results: For the 30-item written exam, mean score of the experimental group was 23.1±3.4 (n=21) vs. 21.8±4.8 (n=19), (P>0 .05). For the practical exam, mean score for both groups was 8.7 out of 16 (P>0 .05). Conclusion: The substitution of eight hours of ultrasound simulation training for live model scanning in a 24 hour training course did not enhance performance on written and image acquisition tests in an introductory ultrasound course for residents. This result suggests that ultrasound simulation technology used as a substitute for live model training on an hour-for-hour basis, did not improve learning outcomes. Further investigation into simulation as a total replacement for live model training will provide a clearer picture of the efficacy of ultrasound simulators in medical education.

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    A. B. Makarov, V. N. Tsygan, A. V. Lemeshchenko, M. V. Rezvantsev, T. A. Krivolutskaya, T. A. Bammatov
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    Sonography.2020; 7(1): 22.     CrossRef
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions