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Research articles
Enhanced numeracy skills following team-based learning in United States pharmacy students: a longitudinal cohort study  
Rob Edwin Carpenter, Leanne Coyne, Dave Silberman, Jody Kyoto Takemoto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:29.   Published online October 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.29
  • 1,886 View
  • 154 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The literature suggests that the ability to numerate cannot be fully understood without accounting for the social context in which mathematical activity is represented. Team-based learning (TBL) is an andragogical approach with theoretical links to sociocultural and community-of-practice learning. This study aimed to quantitatively explore the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development in 2 cohorts of pharmacy students and identify the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development from a social perspective for healthcare education.
Methods
Two cohorts of students were administered the Health Science Reasoning Test-Numeracy (HSRT-N) before beginning pharmacy school. Two years after using TBL as the primary method of instruction, both comprehensive and domain data from the HSRT-N were analyzed.
Results
In total, 163 pharmacy student scores met the inclusion criteria. The students’ numeracy skills measured by HSRT-N improved after 2 years of TBL instruction.
Conclusion
Numeracy was the most significantly improved HSRT-N domain in pharmacy students following two years of TBL instruction. Although a closer examination of numeracy development in TBL is warranted, initial data suggest that TBL instruction may be an adequate proxy for advancing numeracy in a cohort of pharmacy students. TBL may encourage a social practice of mathematics to improve pharmacy students’ ability to numerate critically.
Malaysian pharmacy students’ perspectives on the virtual objective structured clinical examination during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic  
Mohamed Hassan Elnaem, Muhammad Eid Akkawi, Nor Ilyani Mohamed Nazar, Norny Syafinaz Ab Rahman, Mohamad Haniki Nik Mohamed
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:6.   Published online April 12, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.6
  • 6,865 View
  • 326 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated pharmacy students’ perceptions of various aspects of virtual objective structured clinical examinations (vOSCEs) conducted during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic in Malaysia.
Methods
This cross-sectional study involved third- and fourth-year pharmacy students at the International Islamic University Malaysia. A validated self-administered questionnaire was distributed to students who had taken a vOSCE a week before.
Results
Out of the 253 students who were approached, 231 (91.3%) completed the questionnaire. More than 75% of the participants agreed that the instructions and preparations were clear and helpful in familiarizing them with the vOSCE flow. It was found that 53.2% of the respondents were satisfied with the flow and conduct of the vOSCE. However, only approximately one-third of the respondents believed that the tasks provided in the vOSCE were more convenient, less stressful, and easier to perform than those in the conventional OSCE. Furthermore, 49.7% of the students favored not having a vOSCE in the future when conducting a conventional OSCE becomes feasible again. Internet connection was reported as a problem hindering the performance of the vOSCE by 51.9% of the participants. Students who were interested in clinical pharmacy courses were more satisfied than other students with the preparation and operation of the vOSCE, the faculty support, and the allocated time.
Conclusion
Students were satisfied with the organization and operation of the vOSCE. However, they still preferred the conventional OSCE over the vOSCE. These findings might indicate a further need to expose students to telehealthcare models.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • What's been trending with OSCEs in pharmacy education over the last 20 years? A bibliometric review and content analysis
    Angelina S. Lim, Yeap Li Ling, Kyle J. Wilby, Vivienne Mak
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2024; 16(3): 212.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of grit and its associated factors among undergraduate pharmacy students from 14 Asian and Middle Eastern countries amid the COVID-19 pandemic
    Mohamed Hassan Elnaem, Muna Barakat, Naeem Mubarak, Mohammed Salim K.T., Doaa H. Abdelaziz, Ahmed Ibrahim Fathelrahman, Abrar K. Thabit, Diana Laila Ramatillah, Ali Azeez Al-Jumaili, Nabeel Kashan Syed, Mohammed Fathelrahman Adam, Md. Sanower Hossain, Moh
    Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal.2023; 31(3): 410.     CrossRef
  • Shifting to Authentic Assessments? A Systematic Review of Student Perceptions of High-Fidelity Assessments in Pharmacy
    Harjit Singh, Daniel Malone, Angelina S. Lim
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2023; 87(7): 100099.     CrossRef
  • A Telehealth Module and Virtual Objective Structured Clinical Examination of Health Literacy in Pharmacy Education
    Sanah Hasan, Hamzah AlZubaidi, Subish Palaian, Muaed AlOmar, Nadir Kheir, Yassin Al Hariri, Sawsan Shanableh, Ahmed Gaili, Abby Kahaleh
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2023; 87(12): 100555.     CrossRef
  • Is It Time to Revise the Competency-Based Assessment? Objective Structured Clinical Examination and Technology Integration
    Haniye Mastour, Nazanin Shamaeian Razavi
    Shiraz E-Medical Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Virtual OSCE: Experience and challenges with a large cohort of pharmacy students
    Hanis Hanum Zulkifly, Izzati Abdul Halim Zaki, Mahmathi Karuppannan, Zakiah Mohd Noordin
    Pharmacy Education.2022; 22(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Students’ and Examiners’ Experiences of Their First Virtual Pharmacy Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Australia during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Vivienne Mak, Sunanthiny Krishnan, Sara Chuang
    Healthcare.2022; 10(2): 328.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions of Pharmacy Students on the E-Learning Strategies Adopted during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Systematic Review
    Carla Pires
    Pharmacy.2022; 10(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions of undergraduate pharmacy students towards online assessments used during the COVID-19 pandemic in a public university in Malaysia
    Usman Abubakar, A'isyah Humaira' Mohd Salehudin, Nik Afiqah Athirah Nik Mohd Asri, Nur Atiqah Mohammad Rohi, Nur Hasyimah Ramli, Nur Izzah Mohd Khairuddin, Nur Fariesya Saiful Izham, Siti Hajar Nasrullah, Auwal Adam Sa’ad
    Pharmacy Education.2022; 22(1): 191.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Utility of Online Objective Structured Clinical Examination Conducted During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Mona Arekat, Mohamed Hany Shehata, Abdelhalim Deifalla, Ahmed Al-Ansari, Archana Kumar, Mohamed Alsenbesy, Hamdi Alshenawi, Amgad El-Agroudy, Mariwan Husni, Diaa Rizk, Abdelaziz Elamin, Afif Ben Salah, Hani Atwa
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2022; Volume 13: 407.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19-Driven Improvements and Innovations in Pharmacy Education: A Scoping Review
    Jennifer Courtney, Erika Titus-Lay, Ashim Malhotra, Jeffrey Nehira, Islam Mohamed, Welly Mente, Uyen Le, Linda Buckley, Xiaodong Feng, Ruth Vinall
    Pharmacy.2022; 10(3): 60.     CrossRef
  • Supporting pharmacy students' preparation for an entry-to-practice OSCE using video cases
    Michelle Flood, Judith Strawbridge, Eimear Ní Sheachnasaigh, Theo Ryan, Laura J. Sahm, Aoife Fleming, James W. Barlow
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2022; 14(12): 1525.     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
Development and evaluation of an elective course on the pharmacist’s role in disaster management in France  
Marc Montana, Fanny Mathias, Pascal Rathelot, Jérôme Lacroix, Patrice Vanelle
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:19.   Published online July 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.19
  • 13,355 View
  • 184 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
To describe our experiences with the development of an elective course on the pharmacist’s role in disaster management for third-year pharmacy students and to evaluate its effects on students’ knowledge and their perceptions of the introduction of this course into the curriculum.
Methods
An expert team of physicians, surgeons, and pharmacists of the Service de Santé des Armées, pharmacists teaching at the Faculty of Pharmacy, and pharmacists from the Bataillon des Marins Pompiers de Marseille developed a program consisting of 30 hours of modules on disaster response training based on previously published recommendations, a literature analysis, and international guidelines. Students’ knowledge of key competencies was assessed after some teaching sessions through a multiple-choice quiz. Students’ self-perceived knowledge, perceptions of teaching quality, and degree of satisfaction were evaluated through a voluntary survey after the last teaching session on November 15.
Results
The final curriculum consisted of 6 modules. Students’ knowledge of key competencies was assessed using multiple-choice quizzes, with a mean score of 19 of 25. Almost all students (98.3%) reported that this training program improved their knowledge of the pharmacist’s role in disaster management, and 79.3% stated that they would recommend this optional course.
Conclusion
This training course demonstrated the potential to increase the number of pharmacists prepared to respond to disasters. It also expanded students’ understanding of the pharmacist’s role and stimulated their interest in emergency preparedness. Further refinement of the program, including a simulation of mass triage in an emergency setting, will be conducted next year.

Citations

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  • Impact of Nursing Clinical Elective Courses on New Graduate Nurses' Clinical Practice
    Lisa S. Lewis, A. Michelle Hartman, Christina Leonard, Allen Cadavero, Staci S. Reynolds
    Nurse Educator.2024; 49(3): 152.     CrossRef
  • A Scoping Review of Pharmacists’ and Pharmacy Students’ Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes in Medical Emergencies
    Thalita Zago Oliveira, Clara Zambon de Rezende, Higor Weslley Cardoso, Sofia Fernandes Nascimento, João Paulo Alves Cunha, Carla Assad Lemos, Fabiana Rossi Varallo, Leonardo Régis Leira Pereira
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2024; 88(1): 100606.     CrossRef
  • How to Best Prepare Pharmacy Students for Disaster Management: A Qualitative Study
    Chairun Wiedyaningsih, Akhmad Kharis Nugroho, Niken Nur Widyakusuma, Septimawanto Dwi Prasetyo
    Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of drug needs and contributions of pharmacists in the aftermath of the 2011 triple disaster in Fukushima, Japan: A combined analysis
    Takanao Hashimoto, Akihiko Ozaki, Saori Nonaka, Yasuhiro Kotera, Toyoaki Sawano, Masaharu Tsubokura, Kitae Ito, Tomoyoshi Oikawa
    International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction.2023; 98: 104102.     CrossRef
  • Experience of pharmacy involvement in a disaster simulation exercise within a pediatric hospital emergency department: A pilot project
    Kayla Marks, Sarita Chung, Joyce Li, Mark Waltzman, Shannon Manzi, Dhara Shah
    American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.2022; 79(9): e124.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Disaster Medicine Preparedness among Healthcare Profession Students: A Cross-Sectional Study in Pakistan
    Ali Hassan Gillani, Mohamed Izham Mohamed Ibrahim, Jamshaid Akbar, Yu Fang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(6): 2027.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Nalucha Siyanga
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:46.   Published online September 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.46
  • 28,303 View
  • 169 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills.

Citations

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  • Assessing Competences of Geography Students Acquired through the Competence-based Teaching and Learning Approach in Rwandan Secondary Schools
    Dan Imaniriho, Vincent Manirakiza, Delphine Mukingambeho, Mahsen Nyirishema, Innocent Muhire, Jean Leonard Buhigiro
    EAST AFRICAN JOURNAL OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCES.2024; 4(6): 94.     CrossRef
  • Improving Learning and Study Strategies in Undergraduate Medical Students: A Pre-Post Study
    Ivan Sisa, María Sol Garcés, Cristina Crespo-Andrade, Claudia Tobar
    Healthcare.2023; 11(3): 375.     CrossRef
  • STUDY SKILLS AND ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS OF URMIA UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
    Hassan Saber, Ali Heidari, Marziye Mohammadpourr, Hamid Reza Khalkhali, Sima Masudi
    Studies in Medical Sciences.2023; 34(2): 68.     CrossRef
  • Examining anxiety and stress regarding virtual learning in colleges of health sciences: A cross-sectional study in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia
    Tahani Alshammari, Sarah Alseraye, Rawabi Alqasim, Aleksandra Rogowska, Nouf Alrasheed, Musaad Alshammari
    Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal.2022; 30(3): 256.     CrossRef
  • Ascertaining and promoting effective study skills and learning habits of first-year pharmacy students
    Bernadette D'Souza, Amy E. Broeseker
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2022; 14(5): 561.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting academic self-efficacy and learning experiences of pharmacy students: Insights from a qualitative study in Zambia
    Aubrey Chichonyi Kalungia, Micheal Chigunta, James Sichone, Bugewa Apampa, Sarah Marshall, Claire May, Georgina Mulundu, Chiluba Mwila, Sekelani Stanley Banda
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 133.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course  
Justin W. Bouw, Vasudha Gupta, Ana L. Hincapie
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:23.   Published online June 11, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.23
  • 43,136 View
  • 211 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL) modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30) agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30), and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30). However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching.

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  • Application of lecture-and-team-based learning in stomatology: in-class and online
    Biyao Wang, Shan Jin, Minghao Huang, Kaige Zhang, Qing Zhou, Xinwen Zhang, Xu Yan
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Salah Sakka
    Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences.2024; 19(4): 705.     CrossRef
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    Xunan Wang, Ge Song, Rami Ghannam
    Education Sciences.2024; 14(6): 675.     CrossRef
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    Tracey A.H. Taylor, Kyeorda Kemp, Misa Mi, Sarah Lerchenfeldt
    Medical Education Online.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Team-Based Learning in Prosthodontics Courses: Students’ Satisfaction
    Selma A Saadaldin, Elzahraa Eldwakhly, Sundus Naji Alaziz, Alhanoof Aldegheishem, Amal M El sawy, Maha M. Fahmy, Sahar M. Alsamady, Nozha M. Sawan, Mai Soliman, Boonlert Kukiattrakoon
    International Journal of Dentistry.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The effect of online and in-person team-based learning (TBL) on undergraduate endocrinology teaching during COVID-19 pandemic
    Shafeena Anas, Ioannis Kyrou, Mariann Rand-Weaver, Emmanouil Karteris
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and Evaluation of Interactive Flipped e-Learning (iFEEL) for Pharmacy Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Ahmad A. Shahba, Zaid Alashban, Ibrahim Sales, Abdelrahman Y. Sherif, Osman Yusuf
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 3902.     CrossRef
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    Yonghui Feng, Bin Zhao, Jun Zheng, Yajing Fu, Yongjun Jiang
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enhanced numeracy skills following team-based learning in United States pharmacy students: a longitudinal cohort study
    Rob Edwin Carpenter, Leanne Coyne, Dave Silberman, Jody Kyoto Takemoto
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 29.     CrossRef
  • Team-based learning for teaching musculoskeletal ultrasound skills: a prospective randomised trial
    Cassian Cremerius, Gertraud Gradl-Dietsch, Frank J. P. Beeres, Björn -Christian Link, Lea Hitpaß, Sven Nebelung, Klemens Horst, Christian David Weber, Carl Neuerburg, Daphne Eschbach, Christopher Bliemel, Matthias Knobe
    European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery.2021; 47(4): 1189.     CrossRef
  • Design Your Exam (DYE): A novel active learning technique to increase pharmacy student engagement in the learning process
    Ahmad A. Shahba, Ibrahim Sales
    Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal.2021; 29(11): 1323.     CrossRef
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    Shenghua Zha, Shenghua Wu, Julie M. Estis
    IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication.2021; 64(4): 456.     CrossRef
  • Rethinking Teaching Team-Based Learning: The Challenges and Strategies for Medical Education in a Pandemic
    Yun Li, Nicholas A. Sears, Ian V. J. Murray, Kamlesh K. Yadav
    AERA Open.2021; 7: 233285842110672.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of student perception of the Team-based Learning method (APA-TBL): Instrument construction and validation
    Mariana Lucas da Rocha Cunha, Fernanda Amendola, Maria Mercedes Fernandez Samperiz, Andrea Gomes da Costa Mohallem
    Nurse Education in Practice.2018; 33: 141.     CrossRef
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    Tyler Reimschisel, Anna L. Herring, Jennifer Huang, Tara J. Minor
    Medical Teacher.2017; 39(12): 1227.     CrossRef
  • Faculty perception of team-based learning over multiple semesters
    Clark D. Kebodeaux, Golden L. Peters, Paul M. Stranges, Jamie L. Woodyard, Scott Martin Vouri
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2017; 9(6): 1010.     CrossRef
Learning gain of pharmacy students after introducing guided inquiry learning with computer simulation in a pharmacology class in Fiji  
Christian C Ezeala, Arnold A Ram, Napolioni Vulakouvaki
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:9.   Published online December 23, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.9
  • 29,292 View
  • 156 Download
  • 12 Crossref
PDF

Citations

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  • A systematic review on the use of virtual patient and computer-based simulation for experiential pharmacy education
    Chamipa Phanudulkitti, Surangkana Puengrung, Rittnarong Meepong, Kathryn Vanderboll, Karen Bell Farris, Sarah E. Vordenberg
    Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy.2023; 11: 100316.     CrossRef
  • Simulation-Based Education Implementation in Pharmacy Curriculum: A Review of the Current Status
    Ghazwa B Korayem, Omar A Alshaya, Sawsan M Kurdi, Lina I Alnajjar, Aisha F Badr, Amjaad Alfahed, Ameera Cluntun
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2022; Volume 13: 649.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the educational technology use in undergraduate pharmacy teaching and learning – A systematic review
    Chooi Yeng Lee, Shaun Wen Huey Lee
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 159.     CrossRef
  • Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia
    Christian Chinyere Ezeala
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 8.     CrossRef
  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the effectiveness of an online dental pharmacology course
    Miguel A. Morales‐Pérez, Alba R. Muñoz‐Gómez, Gabriela Argumedo, José F. Gómez‐Clavel
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    Journal of Chemical Education.2020; 97(10): 3506.     CrossRef
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    Gashaw Binega Mekonnen, Alemante Tafese Beyna
    BioMed Research International.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Examining the effectiveness of guided inquiry with problem-solving process and cognitive function training in a high school chemistry course
    Niwat Tornee, Tassanee Bunterm, Kerry Lee, Supaporn Muchimapura
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    Karen Dahri, Kimberley MacNeil, Fong Chan, Emilie Lamoureux, Mattie Bakker, Katherine Seto, Janice Yeung
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2019; 11(12): 1309.     CrossRef
  • Palestinian pharmacists’ knowledge of issues related to using psychotropic medications in older people: a cross-sectional study
    Ramzi Shawahna, Mais Khaskiyyi, Hadeel Abdo, Yasmen Msarwe, Rania Odeh, Souad Salame
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 8.     CrossRef
  • Peritoneal Dialysis University for Surgeons: A Peritoneal Access Training Program
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Breadth of knowledge vs. grades: What best predicts achievement in the first year of health sciences programmes?
Boaz Shulruf, Meisong Li, Judy McKimm, Melinda Smith
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:7.   Published online May 16, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.7
  • 35,295 View
  • 166 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to identify those features within secondary school curricula and assessment, particularly science subjects that best predict academic achievement in the first year of three different three-year undergraduate health professional programmes (nursing, pharmacy, and health sciences) at a large New Zealand university. In particular, this study compared the contribution of breadth of knowledge (number of credits acquired) versus grade level (grade point average) and explored the impact of demographic variables on achievement. The findings indicated that grades are the most important factor predicting student success in the first year of university. Although taking biology and physics at secondary school has some impact on university first year achievement, the effect is relatively minor.

Citations

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  • Use of machine learning to assess factors affecting progression, retention, and graduation in first-year health professions students in Qatar: a longitudinal study
    Dalal Hammoudi Halat, Abdel-Salam G. Abdel-Salam, Ahmed Bensaid, Abderrezzaq Soltani, Lama Alsarraj, Roua Dalli, Ahmed Malki
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Swati Kale, Meghana Wadnerkar Kamble, Nicola Spalding
    International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.2020; 27(4): 1.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative analysis of a Māori and Pacific admission process on first-year health study
    Elana Curtis, Erena Wikaire, Yannan Jiang, Louise McMillan, Robert Loto, Airini, Papaarangi Reid
    BMC Medical Education.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions