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Research articles
Effect of an interprofessional simulation program on patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland: a before and after study  
Sylvain Boloré, Thomas Fassier, Nicolas Guirimand
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:25.   Published online August 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.25
  • 1,042 View
  • 132 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to identify the effects of a 12-week interprofessional simulation program, operated between February 2020 and January 2021, on the patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals in Switzerland.
Methods
The simulation training was based on 2 scenarios of hospitalized patients with septic shock and respiratory failure, and trainees were expected to demonstrate patient safety competencies. A single-group before and after study was conducted after the intervention—simulation program, using a measurement tool (the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey) to measure the perceived competencies of physicians, nurses, and nursing assistants. Out of 57 participants, 37 answered the questionnaire surveys 4 times: 48 hours before the training, followed by post-surveys at 24 hours, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks after the training. The linear mixed effect model was applied for the analysis.
Results
Four components out of 6 perceived patient safety competencies improved at 6 weeks but returned to a similar level before training at 12 weeks. Competencies of “communicating effectively,” “managing safety risks,” “understanding human and environmental factors that influence patient safety,” and “recognize and respond to remove immediate risks of harm” are statistically significant both overall and in the comparison between before the training and 6 weeks after the training.
Conclusion
Interprofessional simulation programs contributed to developing some areas of patient safety competencies of healthcare professionals, but only for a limited time. Interprofessional simulation programs should be repeated and combined with other forms of support, including case discussions and debriefings, to ensure lasting effects.
Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
Matthew Bradley
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:21.   Published online August 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.21
  • 1,493 View
  • 155 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is an ever-growing means of healthcare education and often involves simulated participants (SPs), commonly known as actors. Simulation-based education (SBE) can sometimes endanger SPs, and as such we have created a safety checklist for them to follow. This study describes how we developed the checklist through a quality improvement project, and then evaluated feedback responses to assess whether SPs felt our checklist was safe.
Methods
The checklist was provided to SPs working in an acute trust simulation service when delivering multidisciplinary SBE over 4 months. Using multiple plan–do–study–act cycles, the checklist was refined by reflecting on SP feedback to ensure that the standards of the safe simulation were met. We collected 21 responses from September to December 2021 after SPs completed an SBE event.
Results
The responses showed that 100% of SPs felt safe during SBE when using our checklist. The average “confidence in safety” rating before using the checklist was 6.8/10, which increased significantly to 9.2/10 after using the checklist (P<0.0005). The checklist was refined throughout the 4 months and implemented in adult and pediatric SBE as a standard operating procedure.
Conclusion
We recommend using our safety checklist as a standard operating procedure to improve the confidence and safety of SPs during safe and effective simulations.
Educational/faculty development material
Innovative digital tools for new trends in teaching and assessment methods in medical and dental education  
Jung-Chul Park, Hyuk-Jae Edward Kwon, Chul Woon Chung
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:13.   Published online June 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.13
  • 8,215 View
  • 510 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
With the goal of providing optimal care to patients, student-centered active learning and the development of clinical competency have become vital components of the education of future physicians capable of sustainably coping with future challenges. However, the shape of future medicine is dramatically changing based on advances in information and communication technology, and the current classroom model seems to have difficulties in fully preparing students for the future of medicine. New trends in teaching and assessment methods include computer-aided instruction, virtual patients, augmented reality, human patient simulations, and virtual reality for the assessment of students’ competency. The digital technologies introduced in medical and dental education include Google Forms to collect students’ answers, YouTube livestreaming, Google Art & Culture (an online art museum), and choose-your-own-adventure as a story-telling technique. Innovations in digital technology will lead the way toward a revolution in medical and dental education, allowing learning to be individualized, interactive, and efficient.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perception of Remote Learning by Fixed Prosthodontic Students at a Romanian Faculty of Dentistry
    Oana Tanculescu, Alina-Mihaela Apostu, Adrian Doloca, Sorina Mihaela Solomon, Diana Diaconu-Popa, Carmen Iulia Ciongradi, Raluca-Maria Vieriu, Ovidiu Aungurencei, Ana-Maria Fatu, Nicoleta Ioanid, Mihaela Scurtu, Catalina Iulia Saveanu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(4): 3622.     CrossRef
  • The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic on dental school assessments – Current status and future perspectives
    Neha Parikh, Amity Gardner, Alan L. Myers, Richard Halpin, Julian N. Holland, Dharini van der Hoeven
    Journal of Dental Education.2023; 87(6): 825.     CrossRef
  • Are Social Media Platforms Appropriate Sources of Information for Patients Regarding the Topic of Facial Trauma?
    Sara Samur Erguven, Kubra Gulnur Topsakal
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2023; 81(10): 1270.     CrossRef
  • The Digital Story Teaching Method for Master of Nursing Specialist Students
    Hua Zhao, Peng Zhao, Ruihong Wu, Hua Ren
    Education as Change.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Role of E-Content Development in Medical Teaching: How Far Have We Come?
    Maithili N Bankar, Nandkishor J Bankar, Brij Raj Singh, Gulshan R Bandre , Yogendra P Shelke
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Navigating the Research Landscape: An In-Depth Analysis of Challenges Encountered by Public and Private Medical and Dental Undergraduate Students
    Wajiha Qamar, Anita Nisar
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2023; : 63.     CrossRef
  • Buzz Session as an Active Learning Method in Medical Undergraduate Physiology Teaching—An Institutional-Based Study
    Suhail Ahmad Gilkar, Iram Jaan, Shayees Arawa, Mah para Nyiem, Maria Bashir
    Medical Science Educator.2023; 33(5): 1215.     CrossRef
  • The Implication of Virtual Reality Haptic Simulators on Cavity Preparation Proficiency in Dental Preclinical Education: A Systematic Review
    Aysenur ONCU, Berkan CELİKTEN, Emine ODABAŞI TEZER, Meltem ÖZTAN
    European Annals of Dental Sciences.2023; 50(3): 143.     CrossRef
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse, Crypto, and NFTs in Dentistry
    Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar, Aiman S. H. Abu-Fanas
    Education Sciences.2022; 12(8): 538.     CrossRef
  • An innovative approach to teaching depression and anxiety medication management: Virtual choose your own adventure, psychiatry edition
    Nina Vadiei, Jeannie K. Lee
    Mental Health Clinician.2022; 12(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study
    Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 25.     CrossRef
Research article
Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia  
Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:3.   Published online January 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.3
  • 20,526 View
  • 406 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Optimal methods for communication skills training (CST) are an active research area, but the effects of CST on communication performance in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) has not been closely studied. Student roleplay (RP) for CST is common, although volunteer simulated patient (SP) CST is cost-effective and provides authentic interactions. We assessed whether our volunteer SP CST program improved OSCE performance compared to our previous RP strategy.
Methods
We performed a retrospective, quasi-experimental study of 2 second-year medical student cohorts’ OSCE data in Australia. The 2014 cohort received RP-only CST (N=182) while the 2016 cohort received SP-only CST (N=148). The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare the total scores in 3 assessment domains: generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Results
The baseline characteristics of groups (scores on the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test, and medicine program interviews) showed no significant differences between groups. For each domain, the SP-only CST group demonstrated superior OSCE outcomes, and the difference between cohorts was significant (P<0.01). The superiority of volunteer SP CST over student RP CST in terms of OSCE performance outcomes was found for generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Conclusion
The better performance of the SP cohort in physical examination/procedural skills might be explained by the requirement for patient compliance and cooperation, facilitated by good generic communication skills. We recommend a volunteer SP program as an effective and efficient way to improve CST among junior medical students.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A cost analysis of a 5-day simulation-based learning program for speech-language pathology student training
    Elizabeth C. Ward, Emma Caird, Saval Khanal, Sanjeewa Kularatna, Joshua Byrnes, Adriana Penman, Sue Mcallister, Stacey Baldac, Elizabeth Cardell, Rachel Davenport, Bronwyn Davidson, Sally Hewat, Simone Howells, Patricia Mccabe, Alison Purcell, Joanne Walt
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.2023; 25(5): 688.     CrossRef
  • Perception of simulation-based first-aid training by medical students: a qualitative descriptive study
    Lukáš Plch, Daniel Barvík, Tereza Prokopová, Aneta Pilátová, Tereza Vafková, Jiří Zounek
    SN Social Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for the evaluation of Kampo medicine training
    Marie Amitani, Haruka Amitani, Hajime Suzuki, Suguru Kawazu, Kimiko Mizuma, Kojiro Yamaguchi, Toshimichi Oki, Hideaki Nitta, Takuro Sonoda, Keiko Kawano, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Nanami Uto, Rie Ibusuki, Ryutaro Arita, Shin Takayama, Tadamichi Mitsuma, Toshiro Ta
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Use of Simulated Patients Is more Effective than Student Role Playing in Fostering Patient-Centred Attitudes during Communication Skills Training: A Mixed Method Study
    Stanislaw Gorski, Anna Prokop-Dorner, Michal Pers, Agata Stalmach-Przygoda, Łukasz Malecki, Grzegorz Cebula, Katrien Bombeke, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães Abreu
    BioMed Research International.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Improved detection of patient centeredness in objective structured clinical examinations through authentic scenario design
    Kye-Yeung Park, Hoon-Ki Park, Hwan-Sik Hwang, Sang-Ho Yoo, Jae-Sook Ryu, Jong-Hoon Kim
    Patient Education and Counseling.2021; 104(5): 1094.     CrossRef
  • Interventions for improving medical students' interpersonal communication in medical consultations
    Conor Gilligan, Martine Powell, Marita C Lynagh, Bernadette M Ward, Chris Lonsdale, Pam Harvey, Erica L James, Dominique Rich, Sari P Dewi, Smriti Nepal, Hayley A Croft, Jonathan Silverman
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • Raising rare disease awareness using red flags, role play simulation and patient educators: results of a novel educational workshop on Raynaud phenomenon and systemic sclerosis
    S. Sanges, M.-M. Farhat, M. Assaraf, J. Galland, E. Rivière, C. Roubille, M. Lambert, C. Yelnik, H. Maillard, V. Sobanski, G. Lefèvre, D. Launay, S. Morell-Dubois, E. Hachulla
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improved clinical communication OSCE scores after simulation-based training: Results of a comparative study
    Alexandre Nuzzo, Alexy Tran-Dinh, Marie Courbebaisse, Hugo Peyre, Patrick Plaisance, Alexandre Matet, Brigitte Ranque, Albert Faye, Victoire de Lastours, Conor Gilligan
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238542.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of students' performance of objective structured clinical examination during clinical practice
    Jihye Yu, Sukyung Lee, Miran Kim, Janghoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2020; 32(3): 231.     CrossRef
Case report
Authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid gynecology station for the Papanicolaou test as part of a clinical skills examination in Korea  
Ji-Hyun Seo, Younglim Oh, Sunju Im, Do-Kyong Kim, Hyun-Hee Kong, HyeRin Roh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:4.   Published online February 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.4
  • 35,336 View
  • 315 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The objective of this study was to evaluate the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid station that combined a standardized patient encounter and a simulated Papanicolaou test.
Methods
We introduced a hybrid station in the routine clinical skills examination (CSE) for 335 third-year medical students at 4 universities in Korea from December 1 to December 3, 2014. After the tests, we conducted an anonymous survey on the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of the hybrid station.
Results
A total of 334 medical students and 17 professors completed the survey. A majority of the students (71.6%) and professors (82.4%) agreed that the hybrid station was more authentic than the standard CSE. Over 60 percent of the students and professors responded that the station was acceptable for assessing the students’ competence. Most of the students (75.2%) and professors (82.4%) assessed the required tasks as being feasible after reading the instructions.
Conclusion
Our results showed that the hybrid CSE station was a highly authentic, acceptable, and feasible way to assess medical students’ performance.

Citations

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  • From Research to Practice in OBGYN: How to Critically Interpret Studies in Implementation
    Rebecca F. Hamm, Michelle H. Moniz
    Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology.2022; 65(2): 277.     CrossRef
  • Clinical performance of medical students in Korea in a whole-task emergency station in the objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient complaining of palpitations
    Song Yi Park, Hyun-Hee Kong, Min-Jeong Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Sang-Hwa Lee, Sunju Im, Ji-Hyun Seo
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 42.     CrossRef
  • To the Point: The expanding role of simulation in obstetrics and gynecology medical student education
    Elise N. Everett, David A. Forstein, Susan Bliss, Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, LaTasha B. Craig, Scott C. Graziano, Brittany S. Hampton, Laura Hopkins, Margaret L. McKenzie, Helen Morgan, Archana Pradhan, Sarah M. Page-Ramsey
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2019; 220(2): 129.     CrossRef
Research Article
Patient Simulation: A Literary Synthesis of Assessment Tools in Anesthesiology
Alice A. Edler, Ruth G. Fanning, Michael. I. Chen, Rebecca Claure, Dondee Almazan, Brain Struyk, Samuel C. Seiden
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2009;6:3.   Published online December 20, 2009
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2009.6.3
  • 39,190 View
  • 176 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been hypothesized as a modality for assessing competency of knowledge and skill in patient simulation, but uniform methods for HFPS performance assessment (PA) have not yet been completely achieved. Anesthesiology as a field founded the HFPS discipline and also leads in its PA. This project reviews the types, quality, and designated purpose of HFPS PA tools in anesthesiology. We used the systematic review method and systematically reviewed anesthesiology literature referenced in PubMed to assess the quality and reliability of available PA tools in HFPS. Of 412 articles identified, 50 met our inclusion criteria. Seventy seven percent of studies have been published since 2000; more recent studies demonstrated higher quality. Investigators reported a variety of test construction and validation methods. The most commonly reported test construction methods included ?占퐉odified Delphi Techniques??for item selection, reliability measurement using inter-rater agreement, and intra-class correlations between test items or subtests. Modern test theory, in particular generalizability theory, was used in nine (18%) of studies. Test score validity has been addressed in multiple investigations and shown a significant improvement in reporting accuracy. However the assessment of predicative has been low across the majority of studies. Usability and practicality of testing occasions and tools was only anecdotally reported. To more completely comply with the gold standards for PA design, both shared experience of experts and recognition of test construction standards, including reliability and validity measurements, instrument piloting, rater training, and explicit identification of the purpose and proposed use of the assessment tool, are required.

Citations

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  • Simulation-based summative assessment in healthcare: an overview of key principles for practice
    Clément Buléon, Laurent Mattatia, Rebecca D. Minehart, Jenny W. Rudolph, Fernande J. Lois, Erwan Guillouet, Anne-Laure Philippon, Olivier Brissaud, Antoine Lefevre-Scelles, Dan Benhamou, François Lecomte, the SoFraSimS Assessment with simul group, Anne Be
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    Carl J. Schick, Mona Weiss, Michaela Kolbe, Adrian Marty, Micha Dambach, Axel Knauth, Donat R. Spahn, Gudela Grote, Bastian Grande
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions