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Research article
Medical student selection process enhanced by improving selection algorithms and changing the focus of interviews in Australia: a descriptive study
Boaz Shulruf, Gary Mayer Velan, Sean Edward Kennedy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:31.   Published online November 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.31
  • 1,897 View
  • 123 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The study investigates the efficacy of new features introduced to the selection process for medical school at the University of New South Wales, Australia: (1) considering the relative ranks rather than scores of the Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and Australian Tertiary Admission Rank; (2) structured interview focusing on interpersonal interaction and concerns should the applicants become students; and (3) embracing interviewers’ diverse perspectives.
Methods
Data from 5 cohorts of students were analyzed, comparing outcomes of the second year in the medicine program of 4 cohorts of the old selection process and 1 of the new process. The main analysis comprised multiple linear regression models for predicting academic, clinical, and professional outcomes, by section tools and demographic variables.
Results
Selection interview marks from the new interview (512 applicants, 2 interviewers each) were analyzed for inter-rater reliability, which identified a high level of agreement (kappa=0.639). No such analysis was possible for the old interview since it required interviewers to reach a consensus. Multivariate linear regression models utilizing outcomes for 5 cohorts (N=905) revealed that the new selection process was much more effective in predicting academic and clinical achievement in the program (R2=9.4%–17.8% vs. R2=1.5%–8.4%).
Conclusion
The results suggest that the medical student selection process can be significantly enhanced by employing a non-compensatory selection algorithm; and using a structured interview focusing on interpersonal interaction and concerns should the applicants become students; as well as embracing interviewers’ diverse perspectives.
Reviews
History of the medical education accreditation system in Korea: implementation and activities in the early stages  
Kwang-ho Meng
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:29.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.29
  • 5,089 View
  • 98 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Following the opening of 12 new medical schools in Korea in the 1980s, standardization and accreditation of medical schools came to the forefront in the early 1990s. To address the medical community’s concerns about the quality of medical education, the Korean Council for University Education and Ministry of Education conducted a compulsory medical school evaluation in 1996 to see whether medical schools were meeting academic standards or not. This evaluation was, however, a norm-referenced assessment, rather than a criterion-referenced assessment. As a result, the Accreditation Board for Medical Education in Korea (ABMEK) was founded in 1998 as a voluntary organization by the medical community. With full support of the Korean medical community, ABMEK completed its 1st cycle of evaluations of all 41 medical schools from 2000 to 2004. In 2004, ABMEK changed its name to the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) as a corporate body. After that, the Korean government paid closer attention to its voluntary accreditation activities. In 2014, the Ministry of Education officially recognized the KIMEE as the 1st professional institute for higher education evaluation accreditation. The most important lesson learned from ABMEK/KIMEE is the importance of collaboration among all medical education-related organizations, including the Korean Medical Association.

Citations

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  • Development and psychometric evaluation of the nursing home accreditation scale: A methodological study
    Ali Jadidi, Banafshe Samari, Ali Faal Araghi Nejad, Leili Tapak, Masoud Khodaveisi
    International Journal of Africa Nursing Sciences.2024; 20: 100643.     CrossRef
  • The new placement of 2,000 entrants at Korean medical schools in 2025: is the government’s policy evidence-based?
    Sun Huh
    The Ewha Medical Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Accreditation standards items of post-2nd cycle related to the decision of accreditation of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation
    Kwi Hwa Park, Geon Ho Lee, Su Jin Chae, Seong Yong Kim
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2023; 35(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Needs Assessment for the Development of Training Curricula for Internal Medicine Residents
    Kwi Hwa Park, Seung-Joo Na, Youngjon Kim, Sun Jung Myung, Ju Hee Lee, Sun Woo Lee, Bo Young Yoon
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
Changes in the accreditation standards of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation from 2000 to 2019  
Hyo Hyun Yoo, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Keun Mi Lee, Jong Hun Lee, Seung-Jae Hong, Jung –Sik Huh, Won Kyun Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:2.   Published online April 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.2
  • 7,359 View
  • 199 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This review presents information on changes in the accreditation standards of medical schools in Korea by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) from 2000 to 2019. Specifically, the following aspects are explained: the development process, setting principles and directions, evaluation items, characteristics of the standards, and validity testing over the course of 4 cycles. The first cycle of accreditation (2000–2005) focused on ensuring the minimum requirements for the educational environment. The evaluation criteria emphasized the core elements of medical education, including facilities and human resources. The second cycle of accreditation (2007–2010) emphasized universities’ commitment to social accountability and the pursuit of excellence in medical education. It raised the importance of qualitative standards for judging the content and quality of education. In the post-second accreditation cycle (2012–2018) which means third accreditation cycle, accreditation criteria were developed to standardize the educational environment and programs and to be used for curriculum development in order to continually improve the quality of basic medical education. Most recently, the ASK 2019 (Accreditation Standards of KIMEE 2019) accreditation cycle focused on qualitative evaluations in accordance with the World Federation of Medical Education’s accreditation criteria to reach the international level of basic medical education, which emphasizes the need for a student-centered curriculum, communication with society, and evaluation through a comprehensive basic medical education course. The KIMEE has developed a basic medical education evaluation and accreditation system in a step-by-step manner, as outlined above. Understanding previous processes will be helpful for the future development of accreditation criteria for medical schools in Korea.

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  • Quality and constructed knowledge: Truth, paradigms, and the state of the science
    Janet Grant, Leonard Grant
    Medical Education.2023; 57(1): 23.     CrossRef
  • Current perception of social accountability of medical schools in Japan: A qualitative content analysis
    Hiroko Mori, Masashi Izumiya, Mikio Hayashi, Masato Eto
    Medical Teacher.2023; 45(5): 524.     CrossRef
  • Accreditation standards items of post-2nd cycle related to the decision of accreditation of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation
    Kwi Hwa Park, Geon Ho Lee, Su Jin Chae, Seong Yong Kim
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2023; 35(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of external accreditation on students’ performance: Insights from a full accreditation cycle
    Shuliweeh Alenezi, Ayman Al-Eadhy, Rana Barasain, Trad S. AlWakeel, Abdullah AlEidan, Hadeel N. Abohumid
    Heliyon.2023; 9(5): e15815.     CrossRef
  • Is West Really Best? The Discourse of Modernisation in Global Medical School Regulation Policy
    Mohammed Ahmed Rashid, Ann Griffin
    Teaching and Learning in Medicine.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of the degree of social accountability in accreditation standards for basic medical education
    Sangmi T Lee, Eunbae B. Yang
    Korean Medical Education Review.2023; 25(3): 273.     CrossRef
  • Quality improvement in allied healthcare: Key recommendations for educational institutions
    Jithin Kalathikudiyil Sreedharan, Saad Mohammed AlRabeeah, Arun Vijay Subbarayalu, Edan M. AlZahrani, Jaber Saud AlQahtani, Mohammed Dafer AlAhmari, Abdullah Saeed AlQahtani, Musallam AlNasser, Amal AlSomali, Asma Falah AlHarbi, Yaser AlNaam, Ibrahim A. A
    Informatics in Medicine Unlocked.2023; 43: 101412.     CrossRef
  • Development of consensus-based aims, contents, intended learning outcomes, teaching, and evaluation methods for a history of medicine and pharmacy course for medical and pharmacy students in the Arab world: a Delphi study
    Ramzi Shawahna
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The impact of external academic accreditation of undergraduate medical program on students’ satisfaction
    Ayman Al-Eyadhy, Shuliweeh Alenezi
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why social accountability of medical schools in Sudan can lead to better primary healthcare and excellence in medical education?
    MohamedH Ahmed, MohamedElhassan Abdalla, MohamedH Taha
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(8): 3820.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Changing medical students’ perception of the evaluation culture: Is it possible?  
Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Steven Baumann
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:8.   Published online February 15, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.8
  • 28,505 View
  • 178 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Student feedback is a critical component of the teacher-learner cycle. However, there is not a gold standard course or clerkship evaluation form and limited research on the impact of changing the evaluation process. Results from a focus group and pre-implementation feedback survey coupled with best practices in survey design were used to improve all course/clerkship evaluation for academic year 2013-2014. In spring 2014 we asked all subjected students in University of Utah School of Medicine, United States of America to complete the same feedback survey (post-implementation survey). We assessed the evaluation climate with 3 measures on the feedback survey: overall satisfaction with the evaluation process; time students gave effort to the process; and time students used shortcuts. Scores from these measures were compared between 2013 and 2014 with Mann-Whitney U-tests. Response rates were 79% (254) for 2013 and 52% (179) for 2014. Students’ overall satisfaction score were significantly higher (more positive) post-implementation compared to pre-implementation (P<0.001). There was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations (P=0.981) and no change for the amount of time they used shortcuts to complete evaluations (P=0.956). We were able to change overall satisfaction with the medical school evaluation culture, but there was no change in the amount of time students gave effort to completing evaluations and times they used shortcuts to complete evaluations. To ensure accurate evaluation results we will need to focus our efforts on time needed to complete course evaluations across all four years.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Benefits of focus group discussions beyond online surveys in course evaluations by medical students in the United States: a qualitative study
    Katharina Brandl, Soniya V. Rabadia, Alexander Chang, Jess Mandel
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 25.     CrossRef
Technical Report
Reforms of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination regarding item development and performance evaluation  
Mi Kyoung Yim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:6.   Published online March 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.6
  • 36,388 View
  • 191 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE) has undergone a variety of innovative reforms implemented by the National Health Personnel Licensing Examination Board (NHPLEB) in order to make it a competency-based test. The purpose of this article is to describe the ways in which the KMLE has been reformed and the effect of those innovations on medical education in Korea. Methods: Changes in the KMLE were traced from 1994 to 2014 by reviewing the adoption of new policies by the NHPLEB and the relevant literature. Results: The most important reforms that turned the examination into a competency-based test were the following: First, the subjects tested on the exam were revised; second, R-type items were introduced; third, the proportion of items involving problem-solving skills was increased; and fourth, a clinical skills test was introduced in addition to the written test. The literature shows that the above reforms have resulted in more rigorous licensure standards and have improved the educational environment of medical schools in Korea. Conclusion: The reforms of the KMLE have led to improvements in how the competency of examinees is evaluated, as well as improvements in the educational system in medical schools in Korea.

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  • A Survey on Perceptions of the Direction of Korean Medicine Education and National Licensing Examination
    Han-Byul Cho, Won-Suk Sung, Jiseong Hong, Yeonseok Kang, Eun-Jung Kim
    Healthcare.2023; 11(12): 1685.     CrossRef
  • Impact of anesthetist licensing examination on quality of education in Ethiopia: a qualitative study of faculty and student perceptions
    Yohannes Molla Asemu, Tegbar Yigzaw, Firew Ayalew Desta, Tewodros Abebaw Melese, Leulayehu Akalu Gemeda, Fedde Scheele, Thomas van den Akker
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Attitudes to proposed assessment of pharmacy skills in Korean pharmacist licensure examination
    Joo Hee Kim, Ju-Yeun Lee, Young Sook Lee, Chul-Soon Yong, Nayoung Han, Hye Sun Gwak, Jungmi Oh, Byung Koo Lee, Sukhyang Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 6.     CrossRef
  • Is there an agreement among the items of the Korean physical therapist licensing examination, learning objectives of class subjects, and physical therapists’ job descriptions?
    Min-Hyeok Kang, Oh-Yun Kwon, Yong-Wook Kim, Ji-Won Kim, Tae-Ho Kim, Tae-Young Oh, Jong-Hyuk Weon, Tae-Sik Lee, Jae-Seop Oh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 3.     CrossRef
  • The past, present, and future of traditional medicine education in Korea
    Sang Yun Han, Hee Young Kim, Jung Hwa Lim, Jinhong Cheon, Young Kyu Kwon, Hyungwoo Kim, Gi Young Yang, Han Chae
    Integrative Medicine Research.2016; 5(2): 73.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece
    Panteleimon Pantelidis, Nikolaos Staikoglou, Georgios Paparoidamis, Christos Drosos, Stefanos Karamaroudis, Athina Samara, Christodoulos Keskinis, Michail Sideris, George Giannakoulas, Georgios Tsoulfas, Asterios Karagiannis
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 13.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Exploration of examinees’ traits that affect the score of Korean Medical Licensing Examination  
Mi Kyoung Yim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:5.   Published online March 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.5
  • 28,456 View
  • 163 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
It aims to identify the effect of five variables to score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examinations (KMLE) for three consecutive years from 2011 to 2013.
Methods
The number of examinees for each examination was 3,364 in 2011 3,177 in 2012, and 3,287 in 2013. Five characteristics of examinees were set as variables: gender, age, graduation status, written test result (pass or fail), and city of medical school. A regression model was established, with the score of a written test as a dependent variable and with examinees’ traits as variables.
Results
The regression coefficients in all variables, except the city of medical school, were statistically significant. The variable’s effect in three examinations appeared in the following order: result of written test, graduation status, age, gender, and city of medical school.
Conclusion
written test scores of the KMLE revealed that female students, younger examinees, and first-time examinees had higher performances.

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    Kayo Fukami, Kae Okoshi, Yasuko Tomizawa
    SN Social Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Comparative Study of Predictive Factors for Passing the National Physical Therapy Examination using Logistic Regression Analysis and Decision Tree Analysis
    So Hyun Kim, Sung Hyoun Cho
    Physical Therapy Rehabilitation Science.2022; 11(3): 285.     CrossRef
Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba  
P. Ravi Shankar, Arun K Dubey, Ramanan Balasubramanium
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:8.   Published online September 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.8
  • 47,980 View
  • 216 Download
  • 9 Crossref
PDF

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  • Medical Students’ Perception of the Educational Environment at College of Medicine: A Prospective Study with a Review of Literature
    Syed Sameer Aga, Muhammad Anwar Khan, Mansour Al Qurashi, Bader Khawaji, Mubarak Al-Mansour, Syed Waqas Shah, Amir Abushouk, Hassan Abdullah Alabdali, Ahmed Sultan Alharbi, Mishal Essam Hawsawi, Osama Ali Alzharani, Ehsan Namaziandost
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    Gustavo Salata Romão, Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti, Lucélio Bernardes Couto
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Mentoring Environment Through Thematic Analysis of the Learning Environment in Medical Education: a Systematic Review
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    Paul Daniel, Celine Thalappillil Mathew
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    Medical Education Online.2015; 20(1): 28612.     CrossRef
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    BMC Research Notes.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 31.     CrossRef
  • Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study
    P. Ravi Shankar, Rishi Bharti, Ravi Ramireddy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Vivek Nuguri
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 9.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions