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Comparison of nursing students’ performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation between 1 semester and 3 semesters of manikin simulations in the Czech Republic: a non-randomized controlled study  
Vera Spatenkova, Iveta Zvercova, Zdenek Jindrisek, Ivana Veverkova, Eduard Kuriscak
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:9.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.9
  • 1,704 View
  • 91 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the effect of simulation teaching in critical care courses in a nursing study program on the quality of chest compressions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
Methods
An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Health Studies at the Technical University of Liberec. The success rate of CPR was tested in exams comparing 2 groups of students, totaling 66 different individuals, who completed half a year (group 1: intermediate exam with model simulation) or 1.5 years (group 2: final theoretical critical care exam with model simulation) of undergraduate nursing critical care education taught completely with a Laerdal SimMan 3G simulator. The quality of CPR was evaluated according to 4 components: compression depth, compression rate, time of correct frequency, and time of correct chest release.
Results
Compression depth was significantly higher in group 2 than in group 1 (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in the compression rate (P=0.210), time of correct frequency (P=0.586), or time of correct chest release (P=0.514).
Conclusion
Nursing students who completed the final critical care exam showed an improvement in compression depth during CPR after 2 additional semesters of critical care teaching compared to those who completed the intermediate exam. The above results indicate that regularly scheduled CPR training is necessary during critical care education for nursing students.
Simulation-based training using a novel Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration to improve abdominal hysterectomy skills of obstetrics and gynecology residents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia: a pre- and post-intervention study  
Dara Dasawulansari Syamsuri, Brahmana Askandar Tjokroprawiro, Eighty Mardiyan Kurniawati, Budi Utomo, Djoko Kuswanto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:11.   Published online May 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.11
  • 6,025 View
  • 312 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures decreased in Indonesia. The existing commercial abdominal hysterectomy simulation model is expensive and difficult to reuse. This study compared residents’ abdominal hysterectomy skills after simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following a video demonstration.
Methods
We randomized 3rd- and 4th-year obstetrics and gynecology residents to a video-based group (group 1), a simulation-based group (group 2), and a combination group (group 3). Abdominal hysterectomy skills were compared between before and after the educational intervention. The pre- and post-tests were scored by blinded experts using the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Global Rating Scale (GRS).
Results
A total of 33 residents were included in the pre- and post-tests. The OSATS and GRS mean differences after the intervention were higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (OSATS: 4.64 [95% CI, 2.90–6.37] vs. 2.55 [95% CI, 2.19–2.90] vs. 3.82 [95% CI, 2.41–5.22], P=0.047; GRS: 10.00 [95% CI, 7.01–12.99] vs. 5.18 [95% CI, 3.99–6.38] vs. 7.18 [95% CI, 6.11–8.26], P=0.006). The 3rd-year residents in group 3 had greater mean differences in OSATS and GRS scores than the 4th-year residents (OSATS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.88–8.46]; GRS: 12.83 [95% CI, 8.61–17.05] vs. OSATS: 3.40 [95% CI, 0.83–5.97]; GRS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.80–8.54]).
Conclusion
Simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration can be a bridge to learning about abdominal hysterectomy for residents who had less surgical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Improving the quality of care and patient safety in oncology, the contribution of simulation-based training: A scoping review
    Nadia Al Wachami, Mohamed Chahboune, Ibtissam Youlyouz-marfak, Mohamed Reda Mesradi, Hajar Lemriss, Abderraouf Hilali
    International Journal of Nursing Sciences.2024; 11(2): 187.     CrossRef
  • Effect of midwife competence training in primary healthcare facilities on obstetric risk early detection
    Ai Nur Zannah, Yuningsih Yuningsih, Asri Iman Sari, Eka Afdi Septiyono
    Healthcare in Low-resource Settings.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in gynecologic simulation: implementation, validity, and new resources
    Kathryn Edmonds, Steve Warner, Scott Endicott
    Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology.2024; 36(4): 296.     CrossRef
Obstetrics and gynecology residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after an anal sphincter injury simulation-based workshop in Indonesia: a pre- and post-intervention comparison study  
Riska Wahyuningtyas, Eighty Mardiyan Kurniawati, Budi Utomo, Gatut Hardianto, Hari Paraton, Tri Hastono, Djoko Kuswanto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:4.   Published online February 14, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.4
  • 5,048 View
  • 447 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Obstetric anal sphincter injury is one of the most common complications during delivery. Simulation models with manikins can be used as an effective medical learning method to improve students’ abilities before encountering patients. The present study aimed to describe the development of an anal sphincter injury model and to assess residents’ satisfaction and self-confidence after a perineal repair workshop with an anal sphincter injury simulator in Indonesia.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study with evaluation of outcomes before and after the workshop. We created a silicone-latex simulation anal sphincter injury model. Then, we validated this simulation and used it as a simulation model for the workshop. We asked residents about their satisfaction with repairing anal sphincter injuries using a simulation model and residents’ self-confidence when practicing anal sphincter injury repair.
Results
All residents felt the simulation-based workshop was valuable (100%). Most of the scores for the similarity of the simulation model were good (about 8 out of maximum 10). The self-assessment of confidence was measured before and after the workshop. Overall self-confidence increased significantly after the workshop in identifying the external sphincter ani (EAS) (P=0.031), suturing the anal mucosa (P=0.001), suturing the internal sphincter ani (P=0.001), suturing the EAS (P<0.001), and evaluating the sphincter ani tone (P=0.016).
Conclusion
The anal sphincter injury simulator improved residents’ self-confidence in identifying the EAS, suturing the anal mucosa, suturing the internal sphincter ani, suturing the EAS, and evaluating sphincter ani tone.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Objective structured assessment of medical students’ technical skills in second-degree perineal laceration repair with sponge model-based training
    Gregor Leonhard Olmes, Merle Doerk, Erich-Franz Solomayer, Meletios P. Nigdelis, Romina-Marina Sima, Bashar Haj Hamoud
    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparison of the use of manikins and simulated patients in a multidisciplinary in situ medical simulation program for healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom  
Marrit Meerdink, Joshua Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:8.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.8
  • 6,998 View
  • 386 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is increasingly popular in healthcare education, and often relies on specially designed manikins. However, it is also possible to work with actors, or simulated patients (SPs), which may provide a greater sense of realism. This study aimed to compare these 2 approaches, to ascertain which makes healthcare professionals feel most comfortable, which leads to the greatest improvement in confidence, and which is most beneficial to learning.
Methods
This study was embedded in a pre-existing multidisciplinary in situ simulation program. A multidisciplinary group of learners from a range of backgrounds—including nurses, doctors, and other allied health professionals—were asked to complete a questionnaire about their learning preferences. We collected 204 responses from 40 simulation sessions over 4 months, from September to December 2019. Of these 204 responses, 123 described using an SP and 81 described using a manikin.
Results
We found that 58% of respondents believed they would feel more comfortable working with an actor, while 17% would feel more comfortable using a manikin. Learners who used both modalities reported a significant increase in confidence (P<0.0001 for both). Participants felt that both modalities were beneficial to learning, but SPs provided significantly more benefits to learning than manikins (P<0.0001). The most common reason favoring SP-based simulation was the greater realism.
Conclusion
In scenarios that could reasonably be provided using either modality, we suggest that educators should give greater consideration to using SP-based simulation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Communication and swallowing training of stroke‐specialized health professionals using transdisciplinary knowledge in a patient–actor scenario: A case report
    Maria da Assunção Coelho de Matos, Ana Rita Pinheiro, Isabel Maria Monteiro da Costa, Joaquim Alvarelhão
    International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders.2024; 59(2): 798.     CrossRef
  • Learning outcomes and cost-utility analysis of hybrid patient and mannequin-based simulation
    Juana Perpiñá-Galvañ, Silvia Satorra-Rodríguez, Ana Isabel Gutiérrez-García, Noelia García-Aracil, Lourdes José-Alcaide, Néstor Montoro-Pérez, Rocío Juliá-Sanchís
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 132: 106003.     CrossRef
  • Promoting knowledge of metered dose inhaler (MDI) usage among pharmacy professional students through a mobile app
    Muhammad Thesa Ghozali, Tasya Aulia Mutiara
    Journal of Asthma.2024; 61(8): 835.     CrossRef
  • Optimizing Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS®) to Maximize Readiness
    Joseph R Danford, Florencio Reyes, Jennifer M Gurney, Joshua P Smith, Daniel J Stinner
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What is the impact of simulation‐based training for paediatric procedures on patient outcomes, cost and latent safety threats?
    Samuel E. Graef, Nima Karimi, Maggie Xu, Jo‐Anne Petropoulos, Quang N. Ngo, Elif Bilgic
    The Clinical Teacher.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Standardized Patients Versus Mannequins in Mental Health Simulation
    Rebecca Luebbert, Amelia Perez, Angela Andrews, Tracy Webster-Cooley
    Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.2023; 29(4): 283.     CrossRef
  • Use of an in-house-developed, 3D-printed mannequin for emergency medicine training among medical students
    Zulvikar Syambani Ulhaq, Ferry Nur Nasyroh, Achmad Arief Hidayatullah, Christyaji Indradmojo, Amalia Nur Aisa, Gita Vita Soraya
    Educación Médica.2023; 24(6): 100848.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Simulation on Nursing Student Perceptions of Readiness to Provide End-of-Life Care
    Rebecca Dias, Kathryn Robinson, Patricia Poirier
    Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing.2023; 25(6): E116.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of a Simulation-Based Learning Activity Using Actor Patients on Final Year Nursing Students’ Learning
    Dianne Marshall, Michelle Honey
    Nursing Praxis in Aotearoa New Zealand.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse in Medical Education
    Agus Rizal Ardy Hariandy Hamid, Ferdiansyah Sultan Ayasasmita Rusdhy, Prasandhya Astagiri Yusuf
    Medical Journal of Indonesia.2023; 32(2): 67.     CrossRef
  • In situ simulation and its different applications in healthcare: an integrative review
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Simulação in situ e suas diferentes aplicações na área da saúde: uma revisão integrativa
    Marcos Maciel Candido Justino dos Santos, Sara Fiterman Lima, Carine Freitas Galvão Vieira, Alexandre Slullitel, Elaine Cristina Negri Santos, Gerson Alves Pereira Júnior
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception of Realism and Acquisition of Clinical Skills in Simulated Pediatric Dentistry Scenarios
    Begoña Bartolomé Villar, Irene Real Benlloch, Ana De la Hoz Calvo, Gleyvis Coro-Montanet
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11387.     CrossRef
  • Just-in-Time Orientation of Non-Critical Care Nurses to the Critical Care Environment
    Meghan Doelger, Karen Kesten, Bonnie Sakallaris
    The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing.2022; 53(10): 465.     CrossRef
  • Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
    Matthew Bradley
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 21.     CrossRef
  • A manikin or human simulator—development of a tool for measuring students’ perception
    Kamil Torres, Phillip Evans, Izabela Mamcarz, Natalia Radczuk, Anna Torres
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e14214.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions