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Research articles
Information amount, accuracy, and relevance of generative artificial intelligence platforms’ answers regarding learning objectives of medical arthropodology evaluated in English and Korean queries in December 2023: a descriptive study
Hyunju Lee, Soobin Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:39.   Published online December 28, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.39
  • 1,770 View
  • 165 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study assessed the performance of 6 generative artificial intelligence (AI) platforms on the learning objectives of medical arthropodology in a parasitology class in Korea. We examined the AI platforms’ performance by querying in Korean and English to determine their information amount, accuracy, and relevance in prompts in both languages.
Methods
From December 15 to 17, 2023, 6 generative AI platforms—Bard, Bing, Claude, Clova X, GPT-4, and Wrtn—were tested on 7 medical arthropodology learning objectives in English and Korean. Clova X and Wrtn are platforms from Korean companies. Responses were evaluated using specific criteria for the English and Korean queries.
Results
Bard had abundant information but was fourth in accuracy and relevance. GPT-4, with high information content, ranked first in accuracy and relevance. Clova X was 4th in amount but 2nd in accuracy and relevance. Bing provided less information, with moderate accuracy and relevance. Wrtn’s answers were short, with average accuracy and relevance. Claude AI had reasonable information, but lower accuracy and relevance. The responses in English were superior in all aspects. Clova X was notably optimized for Korean, leading in relevance.
Conclusion
In a study of 6 generative AI platforms applied to medical arthropodology, GPT-4 excelled overall, while Clova X, a Korea-based AI product, achieved 100% relevance in Korean queries, the highest among its peers. Utilizing these AI platforms in classrooms improved the authors’ self-efficacy and interest in the subject, offering a positive experience of interacting with generative AI platforms to question and receive information.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Opportunities, challenges, and future directions of large language models, including ChatGPT in medical education: a systematic scoping review
    Xiaojun Xu, Yixiao Chen, Jing Miao
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2024; 21: 6.     CrossRef
  • The emergence of generative artificial intelligence platforms in 2023, journal metrics, appreciation to reviewers and volunteers, and obituary
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2024; 21: 9.     CrossRef
Use of learner-driven, formative, ad-hoc, prospective assessment of competence in physical therapist clinical education in the United States: a prospective cohort study  
Carey Holleran, Jeffrey Konrad, Barbara Norton, Tamara Burlis, Steven Ambler
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:36.   Published online December 8, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.36
  • 1,156 View
  • 127 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this project was to implement a process for learner-driven, formative, prospective, ad-hoc, entrustment assessment in Doctor of Physical Therapy clinical education. Our goals were to develop an innovative entrustment assessment tool, and then explore whether the tool detected (1) differences between learners at different stages of development and (2) differences within learners across the course of a clinical education experience. We also investigated whether there was a relationship between the number of assessments and change in performance.
Methods
A prospective, observational, cohort of clinical instructors (CIs) was recruited to perform learner-driven, formative, ad-hoc, prospective, entrustment assessments. Two entrustable professional activities (EPAs) were used: (1) gather a history and perform an examination and (2) implement and modify the plan of care, as needed. CIs provided a rating on the entrustment scale and provided narrative support for their rating.
Results
Forty-nine learners participated across 4 clinical experiences (CEs), resulting in 453 EPA learner-driven assessments. For both EPAs, statistically significant changes were detected both between learners at different stages of development and within learners across the course of a CE. Improvement within each CE was significantly related to the number of feedback opportunities.
Conclusion
The results of this pilot study provide preliminary support for the use of learner-driven, formative, ad-hoc assessments of competence based on EPAs with a novel entrustment scale. The number of formative assessments requested correlated with change on the EPA scale, suggesting that formative feedback may augment performance improvement.
Brief reports
Initial steps for integrating academic electronic health records into clinical curricula of physical and occupational therapy in the United States: a survey-based observational study  
Stephen Burrows, Lola Halperin, Eric Nemec, Wendy Romney
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:24.   Published online September 2, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.24
  • 3,424 View
  • 199 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Training programs must be designed to prepare physical and occupational therapy students to use electronic health records (EHR) and interprofessional collaboration. This report aims to describe physical and occupational therapy students’ perceptions of integrating an academic EHR (AEHR) in their problem-based learning (PBL) curricula in the College of Health Professions, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut, the United States. A paper-based case approach to PBL was adapted by creating patient cases in an AEHR. Students were asked to complete chart reviews and review provider notes to enhance their learning. An online survey was conducted to determine their perceptions of using AEHR from May 2014 to August 2015. Eighty-five students completed the survey, and 88.1% felt that using an AEHR was needed, and 82.4% felt that the additional notes enhanced their understanding of the interdisciplinary team. However, 83.5% reported the AEHR system increased the time needed to extract meaningful information. Incorporating an AEHR into curricula is essential to ensure students are adequately prepared for future patient interactions.
Educational impact of an active learning session with 6-lead mobile electrocardiography on medical students’ knowledge of cardiovascular physiology during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States: a survey-based observational study  
Alexandra Camille Greb, Emma Altieri, Irene Masini, Emily Helena Frisch, Milton Leon Greenberg
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:12.   Published online June 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.12
  • 3,000 View
  • 240 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Mobile electrocardiogram (ECG) devices are valuable tools for teaching ECG interpretation. The primary purpose of this follow-up study was to determine if an ECG active learning session could be safely and effectively performed during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic using a newly developed mobile 6-lead ECG device. Additionally, we examined the educational impact of these active learning sessions on student knowledge of cardiovascular physiology and the utility of the mobile 6-lead ECG device in a classroom setting. In this study, first-year medical students (MS1) performed four active learning activities using the new mobile 6-lead ECG device. Data were collected from 42 MS1s through a quantitative survey administered in September 2020. Overall, students felt the activity enhanced their understanding of the course material and that the activity was performed safely and in compliance with local COVID-19 guidelines. These results emphasize student preference for hands-on, small group learning activities in spite of the pandemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical student exam performance and perceptions of a COVID-19 pandemic-appropriate pre-clerkship medical physiology and pathophysiology curriculum
    Melissa Chang, Andrew Cuyegkeng, Joseph A. Breuer, Arina Alexeeva, Abigail R. Archibald, Javier J. Lepe, Milton L. Greenberg
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research article
Doctoral physical therapy students’ increased confidence following exploration of active video gaming systems in a problem-based learning curriculum in the United States: a pre- and post-intervention study  
Michelle Elizabeth Wormley, Wendy Romney, Diana Veneri, Andrea Oberlander
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:7.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.7
  • 7,888 View
  • 296 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Active video gaming (AVG) is used in physical therapy (PT) to treat individuals with a variety of diagnoses across the lifespan. The literature supports improvements in balance, cardiovascular endurance, and motor control; however, evidence is lacking regarding the implementation of AVG in PT education. This study investigated doctoral physical therapy (DPT) students’ confidence following active exploration of AVG systems as a PT intervention in the United States.
Methods
This pretest-posttest study included 60 DPT students in 2017 (cohort 1) and 55 students in 2018 (cohort 2) enrolled in a problem-based learning curriculum. AVG systems were embedded into patient cases and 2 interactive laboratory classes across 2 consecutive semesters (April–December 2017 and April–December 2018). Participants completed a 31-question survey before the intervention and 8 months later. Students’ confidence was rated for general use, game selection, plan of care, set-up, documentation, setting, and demographics. Descriptive statistics and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to compare differences in confidence pre- and post-intervention.
Results
Both cohorts showed increased confidence at the post-test, with median (interquartile range) scores as follows: cohort 1: pre-test, 57.1 (44.3–63.5); post-test, 79.1 (73.1–85.4); and cohort 2: pre-test, 61.4 (48.0–70.7); post-test, 89.3 (80.0–93.2). Cohort 2 was significantly more confident at baseline than cohort 1 (P<0.05). In cohort 1, students’ data were paired and confidence levels significantly increased in all domains: use, Z=-6.2 (P<0.01); selection, Z=-5.9 (P<0.01); plan of care, Z=-6.0 (P<0.01); set-up, Z=-5.5 (P<0.01); documentation, Z=-6.0 (P<0.01); setting, Z=-6.3 (P<0.01); and total score, Z=-6.4 (P<0.01).
Conclusion
Structured, active experiences with AVG resulted in a significant increase in students’ confidence. As technology advances in healthcare delivery, it is essential to expose students to these technologies in the classroom.
Educational/Faculty development material
Using a virtual flipped classroom model to promote critical thinking in online graduate courses in the United States: a case presentation  
Jennifer Tomesko, Deborah Cohen, Jennifer Bridenbaugh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:5.   Published online February 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.5
  • 5,009 View
  • 470 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Flipped classroom models encourage student autonomy and reverse the order of traditional classroom content such as lectures and assignments. Virtual learning environments are ideal for executing flipped classroom models to improve critical thinking skills. This paper provides health professions faculty with guidance on developing a virtual flipped classroom in online graduate nutrition courses between September 2021 and January 2022 at the School of Health Professions, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey. Examples of pre-class, live virtual face-to-face, and post-class activities are provided. Active learning, immediate feedback, and enhanced student engagement in a flipped classroom may result in a more thorough synthesis of information, resulting in increased critical thinking skills. This article describes how a flipped classroom model design in graduate online courses that incorporate virtual face-to-face class sessions in a virtual learning environment can be utilized to promote critical thinking skills. Health professions faculty who teach online can apply the examples discussed to their online courses.

Citations

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  • A scoping review of educational programmes on artificial intelligence (AI) available to medical imaging staff
    G. Doherty, L. McLaughlin, C. Hughes, J. McConnell, R. Bond, S. McFadden
    Radiography.2024; 30(2): 474.     CrossRef
  • Team- and Problem-Based Learning in Health Services: A Systematic Literature Review of Recent Initiatives in the United States
    Eileen Alexander, Ashley White, Ashley Varol, Kacey Appel, Cristian Lieneck
    Education Sciences.2024; 14(5): 515.     CrossRef
  • Inculcating Critical Thinking Skills in Medical Students: Ways and Means
    Mandeep Kaur, Rajiv Mahajan
    International Journal of Applied & Basic Medical Research.2023; 13(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Promoting students’ critical thinking and scientific attitudes through socio-scientific issues-based flipped classroom
    Nurfatimah Sugrah, Suyanta, Antuni Wiyarsi
    LUMAT: International Journal on Math, Science and Technology Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Análisis bibliométrico de la producción científica mundial sobre el aula invertida en la educación médica
    Gloria Katty Muñoz-Estrada, Hugo Eladio Chumpitaz Caycho, John Barja-Ore, Natalia Valverde-Espinoza, Liliana Verde-Vargas, Frank Mayta-Tovalino
    Educación Médica.2022; 23(5): 100758.     CrossRef
  • Effect of a flipped classroom course to foster medical students’ AI literacy with a focus on medical imaging: a single group pre-and post-test study
    Matthias C. Laupichler, Dariusch R. Hadizadeh, Maximilian W. M. Wintergerst, Leon von der Emde, Daniel Paech, Elizabeth A. Dick, Tobias Raupach
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research article
No difference in learning outcomes and usability between using controllers and hand tracking during a virtual reality endotracheal intubation training for medical students in Thailand  
Chaowanan Khundam, Naparat Sukkriang, Frédéric Noël
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:22.   Published online August 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.22
  • 5,611 View
  • 355 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We developed a virtual reality (VR) endotracheal intubation training that applied 2 interaction modalities (hand-tracking or controllersIt aimed to investigatedthe differences of usuability between using hand tracking and controllers during the VR intervention for intubation training for medical students from February 2021 to March 2021 in Thailand.
Methods
Forty-five participants were divided into 3 groups: video only, video with VR controller training, and video with VR hand tracking training. Pre-test, post-test, and practice scores were used to assess learning outcomes. The System Usability Scale (SUS) and User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire (USEQ) questionnaires were used to evaluate the differences between the VR groups. The sample comprised 45 medical students (undergraduate) who were taking part in clinical training at Walailak University in Thailand.
Results
The overall learning outcomes of both VR groups were better than those of the video group. The post-test scores (P=0.581) and practice scores (P=0.168) of both VR groups were not significantly different. Similarly, no significant between-group differences were found in the SUS scores (P=0.588) or in any aspects of the USEQ scores.
Conclusion
VR enhanced medical training. Interactions using hand tracking or controllers were not significantly different in terms of the outcomes measured in this study. The results and interviews provided a better understanding of support learning and training, which will be further improved and developed to create a self-learning VR medical training system in the future.

Citations

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  • Do Cone Beam CT Picture Archiving and Communication Systems Viewer Interfaces Meet the Expectations of Dental Professionals From a Usability Perspective?
    Yaren Dogan, Yigit Sirin
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Talia Tene, Diego Fabián Vique López, Paulina Elizabeth Valverde Aguirre, Luz María Orna Puente, Cristian Vacacela Gomez
    Frontiers in Digital Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sun-Yi Yang, Yun-Hee Oh
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 140: 106294.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Hand Tracking in Immersive Virtual Reality for Memory Assessment
    José Varela-Aldás, Jorge Buele, Irene López, Guillermo Palacios-Navarro
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(5): 4609.     CrossRef
  • AR/VR Teaching-Learning Experiences in Higher Education Institutions (HEI): A Systematic Literature Review
    Belen Bermejo, Carlos Juiz, David Cortes, Jeroen Oskam, Teemu Moilanen, Jouko Loijas, Praneschen Govender, Jennifer Hussey, Alexander Lennart Schmidt, Ralf Burbach, Daniel King, Colin O'Connor, Davin Dunlea
    Informatics.2023; 10(2): 45.     CrossRef
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    Yingshu Wang, Congcong Li, Lai Qu, Hongfei Cai, Yingying Ge
    Frontiers in Robotics and AI.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Simulation in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Scoping Review of Recent Practice
    Qingming Wu, Yubin Wang, Lili Lu, Yong Chen, Hui Long, Jun Wang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Implementation and lessons learned from 2 online interprofessional faculty development programs for improving educational practice in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021  
Cesar Orsini, Veena Rodrigues, Jorge Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:21.   Published online August 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.21
  • 5,828 View
  • 307 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study presents the design, implementation, and lessons learned from 2 fit-for-purpose online interprofessional faculty development programs for educational practice improvement in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021. Both programs were designed to enhance teaching and learning practices in an interprofessional environment based on 4 pillars: professional diversity, egalitarianism, blended/online learning, and active learning strategies. A multidisciplinary mix of educators participated, showing similar results. The 3 main lessons learned were that the following factors facilitated an interprofessional environment: a professions-inclusive teaching style, a flexible learning climate, and interprofessional peer work. These lessons may be transferable to other programs seeking to enhance and support interprofessionality. Faculty development initiatives preparing educators for interprofessional practice should be an integral component of health professions education, as delivering these courses within professional silos is no longer justifiable. As the relevance of interprofessional education grows, an effective way of promoting interprofessonal education is to train the trainers in formal interprofessional settings.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perceived team roles of medical students: a five year cross-sectional study
    Anke Boone, Mathieu Roelants, Karel Hoppenbrouwers, Corinne Vandermeulen, Marc Du Bois, Lode Godderis
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research articles
Correlation between academic self-efficacy and burnout originating from distance learning among nursing students in Indonesia during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic  
Ngatoiatu Rohmani, Rosi Andriani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:9.   Published online May 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.9
  • 9,773 View
  • 587 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Distance learning, which became widespread in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, has been a burdensome challenge for students and lecturers. This study investigated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and burnout in first-year nursing students who participated in distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Methods
The study included 69 first-year nursing students at Jenderal Achmad Yani University in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data were collected in September 2020 through self-efficacy and burnout questionnaires that were distributed via email and social media for 2 weeks. The responses were analyzed using the gamma test.
Results
Most respondents were women (78.3%), with an average age of 19 years. Most nursing students had a moderate level of academic self-efficacy (72.5%), while only 13.0% of respondents had a low level of academic self-efficacy. However, 46.4% of students experienced severe burnout during distance learning. Cross-tabulation showed that students with moderate self-efficacy were more likely to experience severe burnout (24 respondents) (P<0.01 and r=-0.884). Exhaustion was the burnout dimension most closely associated with academic self-efficacy.
Conclusion
Students perceived distance learning as burdensome and reported high levels of exhaustion, which may negatively impact their academic achievement. Interventions to improve academic self-efficacy may foster students’ confidence, potentially leading to reduced burnout levels. Nurse educators should reflect upon innovative learning strategies to create a favorable learning environment for nursing students.

Citations

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    Irena M. Ilic, Milena D. Ilic
    Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research.2024; : 1.     CrossRef
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    Sheba D.Mani, Pathiyil Ravi Shankar, Thulasimani Munohsamy
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    Shuang Zheng, Junliang Zhang, Jingming Wang, Ruiqing Shen
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    Zhi‐han Chen, Yuan‐yuan Ma, Xing‐hui Feng, Yan Lin
    Nursing Open.2023; 10(4): 2508.     CrossRef
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    Ling-Na Kong, Yu Yao, Shuo-Zhen Chen, Jia-Lu Zhu
    Nurse Education Today.2023; 121: 105706.     CrossRef
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    Yu Zhang, Ning Zhang, Hongyuan Liu, Yinshi Kan, Yan Zou
    BMC Nursing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Mahdieh Arian, Amirreza Jamshidbeigi, Azadeh Kamali, Zahra Dalir, Tayyebeh Ali-Abadi
    Teaching and Learning in Nursing.2023; 18(4): 512.     CrossRef
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    María Alejandra Camacho-Villa, Ingrid Johanna Díaz-Marín, Erika Tatiana Paredes Prada, Adrián De la Rosa, Gloria Isabel Niño-Cruz
    Healthcare.2023; 11(14): 2024.     CrossRef
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    Hui-Man Huang, Yu-Wen Fang
    Healthcare.2023; 11(14): 2053.     CrossRef
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    Agnese Merlo, Pauline A. Hendriksen, Johan Garssen, Elisabeth Y. Bijlsma, Ferdi Engels, Gillian Bruce, Joris C. Verster
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    Pauline A. Hendriksen, Johan Garssen, Elisabeth Y. Bijlsma, Ferdi Engels, Gillian Bruce, Joris C. Verster
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Comparison of the use of manikins and simulated patients in a multidisciplinary in situ medical simulation program for healthcare professionals in the United Kingdom  
Marrit Meerdink, Joshua Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:8.   Published online April 20, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.8
  • 6,998 View
  • 386 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is increasingly popular in healthcare education, and often relies on specially designed manikins. However, it is also possible to work with actors, or simulated patients (SPs), which may provide a greater sense of realism. This study aimed to compare these 2 approaches, to ascertain which makes healthcare professionals feel most comfortable, which leads to the greatest improvement in confidence, and which is most beneficial to learning.
Methods
This study was embedded in a pre-existing multidisciplinary in situ simulation program. A multidisciplinary group of learners from a range of backgrounds—including nurses, doctors, and other allied health professionals—were asked to complete a questionnaire about their learning preferences. We collected 204 responses from 40 simulation sessions over 4 months, from September to December 2019. Of these 204 responses, 123 described using an SP and 81 described using a manikin.
Results
We found that 58% of respondents believed they would feel more comfortable working with an actor, while 17% would feel more comfortable using a manikin. Learners who used both modalities reported a significant increase in confidence (P<0.0001 for both). Participants felt that both modalities were beneficial to learning, but SPs provided significantly more benefits to learning than manikins (P<0.0001). The most common reason favoring SP-based simulation was the greater realism.
Conclusion
In scenarios that could reasonably be provided using either modality, we suggest that educators should give greater consideration to using SP-based simulation.

Citations

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  • Communication and swallowing training of stroke‐specialized health professionals using transdisciplinary knowledge in a patient–actor scenario: A case report
    Maria da Assunção Coelho de Matos, Ana Rita Pinheiro, Isabel Maria Monteiro da Costa, Joaquim Alvarelhão
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    Joseph R Danford, Florencio Reyes, Jennifer M Gurney, Joshua P Smith, Daniel J Stinner
    Military Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Educación Médica.2023; 24(6): 100848.     CrossRef
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    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Begoña Bartolomé Villar, Irene Real Benlloch, Ana De la Hoz Calvo, Gleyvis Coro-Montanet
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(18): 11387.     CrossRef
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    Meghan Doelger, Karen Kesten, Bonnie Sakallaris
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    Matthew Bradley
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    Kamil Torres, Phillip Evans, Izabela Mamcarz, Natalia Radczuk, Anna Torres
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Medical students’ pattern of self-directed learning prior to and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic period and its implications for Free Open Access Meducation within the United Kingdom  
Jack Barton, Kathrine Sofia Rallis, Amber Elyse Corrigan, Ella Hubbard, Antonia Round, Greta Portone, Ashvin Kuri, Tien Tran, Yu Zhi Phuah, Katie Knight, Jonathan Round
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:5.   Published online April 6, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.5
  • 7,699 View
  • 364 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Self-directed learning (SDL) has been increasingly emphasized within medical education. However, little is known about the SDL resources medical students use. This study aimed to identify patterns in medical students’ SDL behaviors, their SDL resource choices, factors motivating these choices, and the potential impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on these variables.
Methods
An online cross-sectional survey comprising multiple-choice, ranked, and free-text response questions were disseminated to medical students across all 41 UK medical schools between April and July 2020. Independent study hours and sources of study materials prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared. Motivational factors guiding resource choices and awareness of Free Open Access Meducation were also investigated.
Results
The target sample was 75 students per medical school across a total of 41 medical schools within the United Kingdom (3,075 total students), and 1,564 responses were analyzed. University-provided information comprised the most commonly used component of independent study time, but a minority of total independent study time. Independent study time increased as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic (P<0.001). All sub-cohorts except males reported a significant increase in the use of resources such as free websites and question banks (P<0.05) and paid websites (P<0.05) as a result of the pandemic. Accessibility was the most influential factor guiding resource choice (Friedman’s μrank=3.97, P<0.001).
Conclusion
The use of learning resources independent of university provision is increasing. Educators must ensure equitable access to such materials while supporting students in making informed choices regarding their independent study behaviors.

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  • The state of health professions students’ self-directed learning ability during online study and the factors that influence it
    Xiaoyue Xu, Ziyi Li, Louisa Mackay, Na Li, Yaheng Zhang, Yujie Wu, Yang Zhang
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Lin Chen, Norzihani Saharuddin
    International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design.2024; 14(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Assessing medical students’ perception and educational experience during COVID-19 pandemic
    Ernest Z. Low, Niall J. O’Sullivan, Vidushi Sharma, Isabella Sebastian, Roisin Meagher, Dalal Alomairi, Ebraheem H. Alhouti, Claire L. Donohoe, Michael E. Kelly
    Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -).2023; 192(3): 1015.     CrossRef
  • Students' perceptions on how e-learning platforms in universities should be improved to increase the quality of educational services
    Dodu Gheorghe Petrescu, Cristina Neculau, Aida Geamanu, Mihai Adrian Dobra, Ana-Maria Nedelcu, Alin Gabriel Sterian
    Journal of Medicine and Life.2023; 16(9): 1316.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-directed learning skills during online learning amid the COVID-19 pandemic in a Korean medical school
    Jihyun Si
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2022; 34(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Advances in e-learning in undergraduate clinical medicine: a systematic review
    T. Delungahawatta, S. S. Dunne, S. Hyde, L. Halpenny, D. McGrath, A. O’Regan, C. P. Dunne
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Estimation of item parameters and examinees’ mastery probability in each domain of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination using a deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate (DINA) model  
Younyoung Choi, Dong Gi Seo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:35.   Published online November 17, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.35
  • 5,008 View
  • 97 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The deterministic inputs, noisy “and” gate (DINA) model is a promising statistical method for providing useful diagnostic information about students’ level of achievement, as educators often want to receive diagnostic information on how examinees did on each content strand, which is referred to as a diagnostic profile. The purpose of this paper was to classify examinees of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE) in different content domains using the DINA model.
Methods
This paper analyzed data from the KMLE, with 360 items and 3,259 examinees. An application study was conducted to estimate examinees’ parameters and item characteristics. The guessing and slipping parameters of each item were estimated, and statistical analysis was conducted using the DINA model.
Results
The output table shows examples of some items that can be used to check item quality. The probabilities of mastery of each content domain were also estimated, indicating the mastery profile of each examinee. The classification accuracy and consistency for 8 content domains ranged from 0.849 to 0.972 and from 0.839 to 0.994, respectively. As a result, the classification reliability of the cognitive diagnosis model was very high for the 8 content domains of the KMLE.
Conclusion
This mastery profile can provide useful diagnostic information for each examinee in terms of each content domain of the KMLE. Individual mastery profiles allow educators and examinees to understand which domain(s) should be improved in order to master all domains in the KMLE. In addition, all items showed reasonable results in terms of item parameters.

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  • Large-Scale Parallel Cognitive Diagnostic Test Assembly Using A Dual-Stage Differential Evolution-Based Approach
    Xi Cao, Ying Lin, Dong Liu, Henry Been-Lirn Duh, Jun Zhang
    IEEE Transactions on Artificial Intelligence.2024; 5(6): 3120.     CrossRef
Software report
Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:8.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.8
  • 8,091 View
  • 233 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine whether a computer simulation of practical exercises in undergraduate medical pharmacology led to the realization of the intended learning outcomes.
Methods
The study was a descriptive analysis of laboratory classes carried out using computer simulation programs. Five programs were used to teach practical pharmacology to undergraduate medical students at the Mulungushi University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The study period was January 2018 to December 2019. The computer programs included a pharmacokinetics simulator (CyberPatient), organ bath simulator (OBSim), AutonomiCAL for simulating autonomic pharmacology, and Virtual Cat and Virtual Rat (RatCVS) for simulating cardiovascular pharmacology. Students utilized these programs during their pharmacology laboratory classes, wrote reports, and answered relevant clinical questions.
Results
The 5 programs provided easy and precise platforms for students to explore concepts and demonstrate knowledge of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology, and their clinical applications.
Conclusion
The programs were effective learning tools. Students’ learning was easily assessed based on their laboratory reports. Although the computer programs met medical students’ learning needs, wet laboratory exercises are also needed to meet the needs of students who require practical laboratory skills.

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  • Quality and impact of pharmacology digital simulation education on pre-registration healthcare students: A systematic literature review
    Sharad Rayamajhi, Alison Machin, Cathal Breen, Gdiom Gebreheat, Ruth Paterson
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 140: 106295.     CrossRef
  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
Brief report
Physical therapy students’ perceptions of the educational environment at physical therapy institutes in Pakistan  
Muhammad Adeel, Asad Chaudhry
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:7.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.7
  • 6,764 View
  • 156 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study assessed doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students’ perceptions of the educational environment at public and private physical therapy institutes in Pakistan. This cross-sectional study was conducted at 6 physical therapy institutions in Punjab, Pakistan from April 2018 to December 2019. In total, 500 Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaires were distributed among DPT students identified through convenience sampling (response rate, 86.4%). The correlations between each item of the DREEM score were analyzed. The mean overall DREEM score was 128±19.63 for all 5 subscales (range, 33 to 166; standard error of the mean, 0.954). The correlations of atmosphere, learning, and self-perception with the overall educational environment were r=0.896, r=0.853, and r=0.846, respectively. Student-centered approaches were found to be more effective than teacher-centered approaches for promoting a positive educational environment.

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  • Evaluation of providers’ assistive technology service delivery practices in Pakistan
    Areeba Khan, Mary Goldberg, Jonathan Pearlman, Lauren Terhorst
    Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
Research article
Moroccan residents’ perceptions of the hospital learning environment measured with the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure  
Hajar Berrani, Redouane Abouqal, Amal Thimou Izgua
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:4.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.4
  • 8,554 View
  • 219 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the educational environment of residents in Morocco and to compare residents’ perceptions depending on their specialty.
Methods
We applied the French version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) to measure the educational environment at 6 hospitals in Rabat from January to June 2017. The internal reliability of the questionnaire was assessed using Cronbach’s α coefficient. Principal component analysis was conducted to assess the construct validity of the 3 subscales of the PHEEM questionnaire. Analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean scores of the overall PHEEM, its subscales, and each item among the 6 specialties.
Results
Responses from 255 residents were included. The 40-item PHEEM questionnaire showed a high level of reliability, with a Cronbach’s α of 0.91. Principal component analysis of all 40 items suggested that 3 factors explained 48% of the variance, with better results for the teaching subscale. Moroccan residents perceived their educational environment as more positive than negative. There were significant differences in the overall and subscale scores among the 6 specialties.
Conclusion
The French version of the PHEEM was confirmed to be a valid and reliable instrument in Morocco. Moroccan residents perceived their educational environment as more positive than negative, but room for improvement remained, with challenges including the poor infrastructure, the suboptimal quality of supervision, and inadequate teaching and work regulations.

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    Khouloud Abdulrhman Alsofyani, Saud Bahaidarah, Abdulaziz Boker
    Iranian Journal of Pediatrics.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Patrícia Lofêgo Gonçalves, Ana Paula Moscon Marçal, Renata de Almeida França, Vania dos Santos Nunes Nogueira
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Patrícia Lofêgo Gonçalves, Ana Paula Moscon Marçal, Renata de Almeida França, Vania dos Santos Nunes Nogueira
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    María Adelaida Posada Uribe, Verónica Vargas González, Clara Orrego Morales, Carolina Cataño, Elsa María Vásquez, Diana Restrepo
    Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría.2023; 52(1): 20.     CrossRef
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    María Adelaida Posada Uribe, Verónica Vargas González, Clara Orrego Morales, Carolina Cataño, Elsa María Vásquez, Diana Restrepo
    Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría (English ed.).2023; 52(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Postgraduate medical trainees at a Ugandan university perceive their clinical learning environment positively but differentially despite challenging circumstances: a cross-sectional study
    Paul E. Alele, Joshua Kiptoo, Kathleen Hill-Besinque
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sayed Shah Nur Hussein Shah, Ahmed Laving, Violet Caroline Okech-Helu, Manasi Kumar
    BMC Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions