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Research articles
Development and psychometric evaluation of a 360-degree evaluation instrument to assess medical students’ performance in clinical settings at the emergency medicine department in Iran: a methodological study  
Golnaz Azami, Sanaz Aazami, Boshra Ebrahimy, Payam Emami
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2024;21:7.   Published online April 1, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2024.21.7
  • 788 View
  • 163 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
In the Iranian context, no 360-degree evaluation tool has been developed to assess the performance of prehospital medical emergency students in clinical settings. This article describes the development of a 360-degree evaluation tool and presents its first psychometric evaluation.
Methods
There were 2 steps in this study: step 1 involved developing the instrument (i.e., generating the items) and step 2 constituted the psychometric evaluation of the instrument. We performed exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and also evaluated the instrument’s face, content, and convergent validity and reliability.
Results
The instrument contains 55 items across 6 domains, including leadership, management, and teamwork (19 items), consciousness and responsiveness (14 items), clinical and interpersonal communication skills (8 items), integrity (7 items), knowledge and accountability (4 items), and loyalty and transparency (3 items). The instrument was confirmed to be a valid measure, as the 6 domains had eigenvalues over Kaiser’s criterion of 1 and in combination explained 60.1% of the variance (Bartlett’s test of sphericity [1,485]=19,867.99, P<0.01). Furthermore, this study provided evidence for the instrument’s convergent validity and internal consistency (α=0.98), suggesting its suitability for assessing student performance.
Conclusion
We found good evidence for the validity and reliability of the instrument. Our instrument can be used to make future evaluations of student performance in the clinical setting more structured, transparent, informative, and comparable.
Medical students’ patterns of using ChatGPT as a feedback tool and perceptions of ChatGPT in a Leadership and Communication course in Korea: a cross-sectional study  
Janghee Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:29.   Published online November 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.29
  • 2,057 View
  • 174 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to analyze patterns of using ChatGPT before and after group activities and to explore medical students’ perceptions of ChatGPT as a feedback tool in the classroom.
Methods
The study included 99 2nd-year pre-medical students who participated in a “Leadership and Communication” course from March to June 2023. Students engaged in both individual and group activities related to negotiation strategies. ChatGPT was used to provide feedback on their solutions. A survey was administered to assess students’ perceptions of ChatGPT’s feedback, its use in the classroom, and the strengths and challenges of ChatGPT from May 17 to 19, 2023.
Results
The students responded by indicating that ChatGPT’s feedback was helpful, and revised and resubmitted their group answers in various ways after receiving feedback. The majority of respondents expressed agreement with the use of ChatGPT during class. The most common response concerning the appropriate context of using ChatGPT’s feedback was “after the first round of discussion, for revisions.” There was a significant difference in satisfaction with ChatGPT’s feedback, including correctness, usefulness, and ethics, depending on whether or not ChatGPT was used during class, but there was no significant difference according to gender or whether students had previous experience with ChatGPT. The strongest advantages were “providing answers to questions” and “summarizing information,” and the worst disadvantage was “producing information without supporting evidence.”
Conclusion
The students were aware of the advantages and disadvantages of ChatGPT, and they had a positive attitude toward using ChatGPT in the classroom.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Opportunities, challenges, and future directions of large language models, including ChatGPT in medical education: a systematic scoping review
    Xiaojun Xu, Yixiao Chen, Jing Miao
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2024; 21: 6.     CrossRef
  • Embracing ChatGPT for Medical Education: Exploring Its Impact on Doctors and Medical Students
    Yijun Wu, Yue Zheng, Baijie Feng, Yuqi Yang, Kai Kang, Ailin Zhao
    JMIR Medical Education.2024; 10: e52483.     CrossRef
  • ChatGPT and Clinical Training: Perception, Concerns, and Practice of Pharm-D Students
    Mohammed Zawiah, Fahmi Al-Ashwal, Lobna Gharaibeh, Rana Abu Farha, Karem Alzoubi, Khawla Abu Hammour, Qutaiba A Qasim, Fahd Abrah
    Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare.2023; Volume 16: 4099.     CrossRef
  • Information amount, accuracy, and relevance of generative artificial intelligence platforms’ answers regarding learning objectives of medical arthropodology evaluated in English and Korean queries in December 2023: a descriptive study
    Hyunju Lee, Soobin Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 39.     CrossRef
Development of a character qualities test for medical students in Korea using polytomous item response theory and factor analysis: a preliminary scale development study  
Yera Hur, Dong Gi Seo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:20.   Published online June 26, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.20
  • 1,568 View
  • 109 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to develop a test scale to measure the character qualities of medical students as a follow-up study on the 8 core character qualities revealed in a previous report.
Methods
In total, 160 preliminary items were developed to measure 8 core character qualities. Twenty questions were assigned to each quality, and a questionnaire survey was conducted among 856 students in 5 medical schools in Korea. Using the partial credit model, polytomous item response theory analysis was carried out to analyze the goodness-of-fit, followed by exploratory factor analysis. Finally, confirmatory factor and reliability analyses were conducted with the final selected items.
Results
The preliminary items for the 8 core character qualities were administered to the participants. Data from 767 students were included in the final analysis. Of the 160 preliminary items, 25 were removed by classical test theory analysis and 17 more by polytomous item response theory assessment. A total of 118 items and sub-factors were selected for exploratory factor analysis. Finally, 79 items were selected, and the validity and reliability were confirmed through confirmatory factor analysis and intra-item relevance analysis.
Conclusion
The character qualities test scale developed through this study can be used to measure the character qualities corresponding to the educational goals and visions of individual medical schools in Korea. Furthermore, this measurement tool can serve as primary data for developing character qualities tools tailored to each medical school’s vision and educational goals.
Identifying the nutrition support nurses’ tasks using importance–performance analysis in Korea: a descriptive study  
Jeong Yun Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:3.   Published online January 18, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.3
  • 1,826 View
  • 144 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Nutrition support nurse is a member of a nutrition support team and is a health care professional who takes a significant part in all aspects of nutritional care. This study aims to investigate ways to improve the quality of tasks performed by nutrition support nurses through survey questionnaires in Korea.
Methods
An online survey was conducted between October 12 and November 31, 2018. The questionnaire consists of 36 items categorized into 5 subscales: nutrition-focused support care, education and counseling, consultation and coordination, research and quality improvement, and leadership. The importance–performance analysis method was used to confirm the relationship between the importance and performance of nutrition support nurses’ tasks.
Results
A total of 101 nutrition support nurses participated in this survey. The importance (5.56±0.78) and performance (4.50±1.06) of nutrition support nurses’ tasks showed a significant difference (t=11.27, P<0.001). Education, counseling/consultation, and participation in developing their processes and guidelines were identified as low-performance activities compared with their importance.
Conclusion
To intervene nutrition support effectively, nutrition support nurses should have the qualification or competency through the education program based on their practice. Improved awareness of nutrition support nurses participating in research and quality improvement activity for role development is required.
The sights and insights of examiners in objective structured clinical examinations  
Lauren Chong, Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Barbara-Ann Adelstein, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:34.   Published online December 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.34
  • 31,761 View
  • 407 Download
  • 35 Web of Science
  • 33 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is considered to be one of the most robust methods of clinical assessment. One of its strengths lies in its ability to minimise the effects of examiner bias due to the standardisation of items and tasks for each candidate. However, OSCE examiners’ assessment scores are influenced by several factors that may jeopardise the assumed objectivity of OSCEs. To better understand this phenomenon, the current review aims to determine and describe important sources of examiner bias and the factors affecting examiners’ assessments.
Methods
We performed a narrative review of the medical literature using Medline. All articles meeting the selection criteria were reviewed, with salient points extracted and synthesised into a clear and comprehensive summary of the knowledge in this area.
Results
OSCE examiners’ assessment scores are influenced by factors belonging to 4 different domains: examination context, examinee characteristics, examinee-examiner interactions, and examiner characteristics. These domains are composed of several factors including halo, hawk/dove and OSCE contrast effects; the examiner’s gender and ethnicity; training; lifetime experience in assessing; leadership and familiarity with students; station type; and site effects.
Conclusion
Several factors may influence the presumed objectivity of examiners’ assessments, and these factors need to be addressed to ensure the objectivity of OSCEs. We offer insights into directions for future research to better understand and address the phenomenon of examiner bias.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Does following an “excellent” candidate in the objective structured clinical examination affect your checklist score?
    Craig Brown, Mintu Nath, Wendy Watson, Mary Joan Macleod
    Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education.2024; 16(3): 891.     CrossRef
  • Objective structured clinical examination for teaching and assessment: Evidence-based critique
    Pooja Dewan, Sumaira Khalil, Piyush Gupta
    Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health.2024; 25: 101477.     CrossRef
  • A Look at Demographics and Transition to Virtual Assessments: An Analysis of Bias in the American Board of Surgery General Surgery Certifying Exams
    Beatriz Ibáñez, Andrew T. Jones, D. Rohan Jeyarajah, Daniel L. Dent, Caroline Prendergast, Carol L. Barry
    Journal of Surgical Education.2024; 81(4): 578.     CrossRef
  • Analyse systématique des évaluations de circuits multiples d’examen clinique objectif structuré (ECOS) : variables explicatives et corrélations inter-évaluateurs
    E. Ollier, C. Pelissier, C. Boissier, T. Barjat, P. Berthelot, C. Boutet, X. Gocko, C. Le Hello, S. Perinel
    La Revue de Médecine Interne.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Educational guidelines for diversity and inclusion: addressing racism and eliminating biases in medical education
    Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, Laura Baecher-Lind, Camille A. Clare, B. Star Hampton, Michael D. Moxley, Dotun Ogunyemi, Archana A. Pradhan, Shireen M. Madani Sims, Sara Whetstone, Mark B. Woodland, Nadine T. Katz
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2023; 228(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • Quality Management of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations at a Multicampus Nursing College: A Pilot Study
    Thandolwakhe Nyangeni, Dalena R.M. van Rooyen, Wilma ten Ham-Baloyi
    Journal of Nursing Education.2023; 62(3): 155.     CrossRef
  • Scoring consistency of standard patients and examiners in the developed dental objective structured clinical examination system
    Feng Zhu, Li Wu, Xiuxiu Shao, Lijuan Huang, Xiangfeng Meng, Rongrong Nie
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sebastian Dewhirst, Timothy J. Wood, Warren J. Cheung, Jason R. Frank
    Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Charu Sharma, Pratibha Singh, Shashank Shekhar, Abhishek Bhardwaj, Manisha Jhirwal, Navdeep Kaur Ghuman, Meenakshi Gothwal, Garima Yadav, Priyanka Kathuria, Vibha Mishra
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  • Interactions between the sex of the clinician grader and the sex of the chiropractic student intern on spinal manipulation assessment grade
    Michael Sheppard, Stephanie Johnson, Victor Quiroz, John Ward
    Journal of Chiropractic Education.2023; 37(2): 157.     CrossRef
  • PERCEPTION OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AND EXAMINERS TOWARDS OBJECTIVE STRUCTURED CLINICAL EXAMINATION: A FEEDBACK FOR IMPROVEMENT
    Rozhan Sediq, Jamal Salih, Fattah Fattah, Adnan Hassan
    JOURNAL OF SULAIMANI MEDICAL COLLEGE.2023; 13(1): 57.     CrossRef
  • Response to: Twelve tips for conducting a virtual OSCE
    Mohamed Guled, Juned Islam, Haseeb Qureshi
    Medical Teacher.2022; 44(1): 101.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of OSCE performance between 6- and 7-year medical school curricula in Taiwan
    Jr-Wei Wu, Hao-Min Cheng, Shiau-Shian Huang, Jen-Feng Liang, Chia-Chang Huang, Ling-Yu Yang, Boaz Shulruf, Ying-Ying Yang, Chen-Huan Chen, Ming-Chih Hou, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated With Undergraduate Nursing Students' Academic and Clinical Performance: A Mixed-Methods Study
    Ensieh Fooladi, Md Nazmul Karim, Sheila Vance, Lorraine Walker, Maya Ebrahimi Zanjani, Dragan Ilic, Gabrielle Brand
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical Students’ Perception of a Newly Implemented Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Orthopedic Surgery and Trauma: A Mixed-Method Study
    Asser Sallam, Hani Atwa, Adel Abdelaziz, Asmaa Abdel Nasser
    Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health.2022; 22(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Using Think-aloud Interviews to Examine a Clinically Oriented Performance Assessment Rubric
    Mary Roduta Roberts, Chad M. Gotch, Megan Cook, Karin Werther, Iris C. I. Chao
    Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives.2022; 20(3): 139.     CrossRef
  • Objective structured clinical examination: Challenges and opportunities from students’ perspective
    Nazdar Alkhateeb, Abubakir Majeed Salih, Nazar Shabila, Ali Al-Dabbagh, Ayse Hilal Bati
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(9): e0274055.     CrossRef
  • Medical school grades may predict future clinical competence
    Jr-Wei Wu, Hao-Min Cheng, Shiau-Shian Huang, Jen-Feng Liang, Chia-Chang Huang, Boaz Shulruf, Ying-Ying Yang, Chen-Huan Chen, Ming-Chih Hou, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association.2022; 85(9): 909.     CrossRef
  • Development and Evaluation of an Online Exam for Exercise Physiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Amanda L Burdett, Nancy van Doorn, Matthew D Jones, Natalie CG Kwai, Rachel E Ward, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Clinical Exercise Physiology.2022; 11(4): 122.     CrossRef
  • eOSCE stations live versus remote evaluation and scores variability
    Donia Bouzid, Jimmy Mullaert, Aiham Ghazali, Valentine Marie Ferré, France Mentré, Cédric Lemogne, Philippe Ruszniewski, Albert Faye, Alexy Tran Dinh, Tristan Mirault, Nathan Peiffer Smadja, Léonore Muller, Laure Falque Pierrotin, Michael Thy, Maksud Assa
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Equal Z standard-setting method to estimate the minimum number of panelists for a medical school’s objective structured clinical examination in Taiwan: a simulation study
    Ying-Ying Yang, Pin-Hsiang Huang, Ling-Yu Yang, Chia-Chang Huang, Chih-Wei Liu, Shiau-Shian Huang, Chen-Huan Chen, Fa-Yauh Lee, Shou-Yen Kao, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 27.     CrossRef
  • Augmenting physician examiner scoring in objective structured clinical examinations: including the standardized patient perspective
    Marguerite Roy, Josée Wojcik, Ilona Bartman, Sydney Smee
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2021; 26(1): 313.     CrossRef
  • Re-conceptualising and accounting for examiner (cut-score) stringency in a ‘high frequency, small cohort’ performance test
    Matt Homer
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2021; 26(2): 369.     CrossRef
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    Majid Yousefi Afrashteh
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Bunmi S. Malau‐Aduli, Richard B. Hays, Karen D’Souza, Amy M. Smith, Karina Jones, Richard Turner, Lizzi Shires, Jane Smith, Shannon Saad, Cassandra Richmond, Antonio Celenza, Tarun Sen Gupta
    Medical Education.2021; 55(3): 344.     CrossRef
  • Tutor–Student Partnership in Practice OSCE to Enhance Medical Education
    Eve Cosker, Valentin Favier, Patrice Gallet, Francis Raphael, Emmanuelle Moussier, Louise Tyvaert, Marc Braun, Eva Feigerlova
    Medical Science Educator.2021; 31(6): 1803.     CrossRef
  • Perception of Students and Examiners about Objective Structured Clinical Examination in a Teaching Hospital in Ethiopia
    Henok Fisseha, Hailemichael Desalegn
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 1439.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on the Learning Outcomes of Medical Students in Taiwan: A Two-Year Prospective Cohort Study of OSCE Performance
    Tzyy-Yurn Tzeng, Chia-An Hsu, Ying-Ying Yang, Eunice J. Yuan, Ya-Ting Chang, Tzu-Hao Li, Chung-Pin Li, Jen-Feng Liang, Jiing-Feng Lirng, Tzeng-Ji Chen, Chia-Chang Huang, Ming-Chih Hou, Chen-Huan Chen, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
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  • Assessment methods and the validity and reliability of measurement tools in online objective structured clinical examinations: a systematic scoping review
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 11.     CrossRef
  • Versatility in multiple mini-interview implementation: Rater background does not significantly influence assessment scoring
    Keith D. Baker, Roy T. Sabo, Meagan Rawls, Moshe Feldman, Sally A. Santen
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Qualifying online assessment during COVID-19 pandemic: Reflecting on our experience under the cognitive lens of Miller’s pyramid
    Dinesh Kumar, Rajasekhar Sajja SN
    Research and Development in Medical Education.2020; 9(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia
    Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 3.     CrossRef
  • Insights into student assessment outcomes in rural clinical campuses
    Boaz Shulruf, Gary Velan, Lesley Forster, Anthony O’Sullivan, Peter Harris, Silas Taylor
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Effectiveness of pre-admission data and letters of recommendation to predict students who will need professional behavior intervention during clinical rotations in the United States  
Chalee Engelhard, Rebecca Leugers, Jenna Stephan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:26.   Published online June 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.26
  • 27,704 View
  • 296 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The study aimed at finding the value of letters of recommendation in predicting professional behavior problems in the clinical portion of a Doctor of Physical Therapy program learning cohorts from 2009-2014 in the United States. De-identified records of 137 Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates were examined by the descriptive statistics and comparison analysis. Thirty letters of recommendation were investigated based on grounded theory from 10 student applications with 5 randomly selected students of interest and 5 non-students of interest. Critical thinking, organizational skills, and judgement were statistically significant and quantitative differentiating characteristics. Qualitatively, significant characteristics of the student of interest included effective communication and cultural competency. Meanwhile, those of nonstudents of interest included conflicting personality descriptor, commitment to learning, balance, teamwork skills, potential future success, compatible learning skills, effective leadership skills, and emotional intelligence. Emerged significant characteristics did not consistently match common non-professional behavior issues encountered in clinic. Pre-admission data and letters of recommendation appear of limited value in predicting professional behavior performance in clinic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Vital Role of Professionalism in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Julie K. Silver, Sara Cuccurullo, Lyn D. Weiss, Christopher Visco, Mooyeon Oh-Park, Danielle Perret Karimi, Walter R. Frontera, Talya K. Fleming, Glendaliz Bosques, Saurabha Bhatnagar, Anne Felicia Ambrose, Vu Q.C. Nguyen
    American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.2020; 99(4): 273.     CrossRef
Research Article
Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students  
Valerie O’Toole Baker, Ronald Cuzzola, Carolyn Knox, Cynthia Liotta, Charles S. Cornfield, Robert D. Tarkowski, Carolynn Masters, Michael McCarthy, Suzanne Sturdivant, Jestin N. Carlson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:36.   Published online June 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.36
  • 35,132 View
  • 304 Download
  • 32 Web of Science
  • 31 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS) has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. Methods: We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM) and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT) scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. Results: We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P= 0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively), as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team’s ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively) as measured by TEAM. Conclusions: Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Technology-enhanced trauma training in low-resource settings: A scoping review and feasibility analysis of educational technologies
    Minahil Khan, Fabio Botelho, Laura Pinkham, Elena Guadagno, Dan Poenaru
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  • SIMULAÇÃO NO ENSINO DE URGÊNCIA E EMERGÊNCIA PARA ENFERMAGEM
    Amanda Diniz Silva, Suzel Regina Ribeiro Chavaglia, Fabiana Cristina Pires, Caroline Bueno de Moraes Pereira, Ingrid Fidelix de Souza, Elizabeth Barichello, Rosali Isabel Barduchi Ohl
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    Cristian Lieneck, Tiankai Wang, David Gibbs, Chris Russian, Zo Ramamonjiarivelo, Arzu Ari
    Education Sciences.2022; 12(12): 850.     CrossRef
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    Matthew J. Davis, Bryan C. Luu, Sarth Raj, Amjed Abu-Ghname, Edward P. Buchanan
    The Surgeon.2021; 19(1): 49.     CrossRef
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    James Ashcroft, Aimee Wilkinson, Mansoor Khan
    Journal of Surgical Education.2021; 78(1): 245.     CrossRef
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    Rosemary Saunders, Emma Wood, Adam Coleman, Karen Gullick, Renée Graham, Karla Seaman
    Australasian Emergency Care.2021; 24(2): 89.     CrossRef
  • Brick in the wall? Linking quality of debriefing to participant learning in team training of interprofessional students
    John T Paige, Deborah D Garbee, Qingzhao Yu, John Zahmjahn, Raquel Baroni de Carvalho, Lin Zhu, Vadym Rusnak, Vladimir J Kiselov
    BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning.2021; : bmjstel-2020-000685.     CrossRef
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    Sarth Raj, Elizabeth M. Williams, Matthew J. Davis, Amjed Abu-Ghname, Bryan C. Luu, Edward P. Buchanan
    Annals of Plastic Surgery.2021; 87(2): 206.     CrossRef
  • Teamwork competence and readiness of emergency nurses in the care of trauma patients: A multicenter cross-sectional study
    Bahman Aghaie, Saeide Heidari, Mohammad Abbasinia, Maryam Abdoli, Reza Norouzadeh, Mahdi Shamali
    International Emergency Nursing.2021; 59: 101073.     CrossRef
  • Simulated Participants as Health Care Providers: An Innovative Approach to Interprofessional Simulation
    Jennifer Gunberg Ross, Colleen H. Meakim, Stacy Grant Hohenleitner, Patricia Prieto, Arlene Solnick, Kathleen Williams Yates, Bing Bing Qi
    Nursing Education Perspectives.2021; 42(6): E187.     CrossRef
  • TeamSTEPPS Curricular-Wide Integration
    Jennifer Gunberg Ross, Eleanor Latz, Colleen H. Meakim, Bette Mariani
    Nurse Educator.2021; 46(6): 355.     CrossRef
  • Perspective and Experience of Operating Room Personnel on Ethical Behaviors
    Soheila Bakhtiari, Mahnaz Rakhshan, Mohsen Shahriari, Farkhondeh Sharif
    Electronic Journal of General Medicine.2020; 17(3): em198.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of TeamSTEPPS Training in Prelicensure Health Care Practitioner Programs: An Integrative Review
    Jennifer Gunberg Ross, Colleen Meakim, Stacy Grant Hohenleitner
    Journal of Nursing Education.2020; 59(11): 610.     CrossRef
  • Development and Empirical Testing of a Novel Team Leadership Assessment Measure: A Pilot Study Using Simulated and Live Patient Encounters
    Elizabeth D. Rosenman, Mark J. Bullard, Kerin A. Jones, Laura Welsh, Sarah M. Brolliar, Benjamin R. Levine, James A. Grand, Rosemarie Fernandez, Daniel Egan
    AEM Education and Training.2019; 3(2): 163.     CrossRef
  • Patient safety education of the graduation in Nursing from the teaching perspective
    Elena Bohomol
    Escola Anna Nery.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Implementation, evaluation, and outcome of TeamSTEPPS in interprofessional education: a scoping review
    Alissa S. Chen, Bernice Yau, Lee Revere, Jennifer Swails
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions