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Adequacy of the examination-based licensing system and a training-based licensing system for midwifery license according to changes in childbirth medical infrastructure in Korea: a survey-based descriptive study  
Yun Mi Kim, Sun Hee Lee, Sun Ok Lee, Mi Young An, Bu Youn Kim, Jum Mi Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:15.   Published online May 22, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.15
  • 771 View
  • 57 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The number of Korean midwifery licensing examination applicants has steadily decreased due to the low birth rate and lack of training institutions for midwives. This study aimed to evaluate the adequacy of the examination-based licensing system and the possibility of a training-based licensing system.
Methods
A survey questionnaire was developed and dispatched to 230 professionals from December 28, 2022 to January 13, 2023, through an online form using Google Surveys. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the results.
Results
Responses from 217 persons (94.3%) were analyzed after excluding incomplete responses. Out of the 217 participants, 198 (91.2%) agreed with maintaining the current examination-based licensing system; 94 (43.3%) agreed with implementing a training-based licensing system to cover the examination costs due to the decreasing number of applicants; 132 (60.8%) agreed with establishing a midwifery education evaluation center for a training-based licensing system; 163 (75.1%) said that the quality of midwifery might be lowered if midwives were produced only by a training-based licensing system, and 197 (90.8%) said that the training of midwives as birth support personnel should be promoted in Korea.
Conclusion
Favorable results were reported for the examination-based licensing system; however, if a training-based licensing system is implemented, it will be necessary to establish a midwifery education evaluation center to manage the quality of midwives. As the annual number of candidates for the Korean midwifery licensing examination has been approximately 10 in recent years, it is necessary to consider more actively granting midwifery licenses through a training-based licensing system.
Evaluation of student perceptions with 2 interprofessional assessment tools—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale—following didactic and clinical learning experiences in the United States  
Vincent Dennis, Melissa Craft, Dale Bratzler, Melody Yozzo, Denise Bender, Christi Barbee, Stephen Neely, Margaret Robinson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:35.   Published online November 5, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.35
  • 9,727 View
  • 217 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated changes in students’ attitudes using 2 validated interprofessional survey instruments—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning (CHIRP) instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale (IPAS)—before and after didactic and clinical cohorts.
Methods
Students from 7 colleges/schools participated in didactic and clinical cohorts during the 2017–2018 year. Didactic cohorts experienced 2 interactive sessions 6 months apart, while clinical cohorts experienced 4 outpatient clinical sessions once monthly. For the baseline and post-cohort assessments, 865 students were randomly assigned to complete either the 14-item CHIRP or the 27-item IPAS. The Pittman test using permutations of linear ranks was used to determine differences in the score distribution between the baseline and post-cohort assessments. Pooled results were compared for the CHIRP total score and the IPAS total and subdomain scores. For each score, 3 comparisons were made simultaneously: overall baseline versus post-didactic cohort, overall baseline versus post-clinical cohort, and post-didactic cohort versus post-clinical cohort. Alpha was adjusted to 0.0167 to account for simultaneous comparisons.
Results
The baseline and post-cohort survey response rates were 62.4% and 65.9% for CHIRP and 58.7% and 58.1% for IPAS, respectively. The post-clinical cohort scores for the IPAS subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities were significantly higher than the baseline and post-didactic cohort scores. No differences were seen for the remaining IPAS subdomain scores or the CHIRP instrument total score.
Conclusion
The IPAS instrument may discern changes in student attitudes in the subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities following short-term clinical experiences involving diverse interprofessional team members.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interprofessional communication skills training to improve medical students’ and nursing trainees’ error communication - quasi-experimental pilot study
    Lina Heier, Barbara Schellenberger, Anna Schippers, Sebastian Nies, Franziska Geiser, Nicole Ernstmann
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and implementation of interprofessional education activity among health professions students in Jordan: A pilot investigation
    Osama Y. Alshogran, Zaid Al-Hamdan, Alla El-Awaisi, Hana Alkhalidy, Nesreen Saadeh, Hadeel Alsqaier
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2023; 37(4): 588.     CrossRef
  • Tools for faculty assessment of interdisciplinary competencies of healthcare students: an integrative review
    Sharon Brownie, Denise Blanchard, Isaac Amankwaa, Patrick Broman, Marrin Haggie, Carlee Logan, Amy Pearce, Kesava Sampath, Ann-Rong Yan, Patrea Andersen
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education tracks: One schools response to common IPE barriers
    Kim G. Adcock, Sally Earl
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2023; 15(5): 528.     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education and collaborative practice in Nigeria – Pharmacists' and pharmacy students' attitudes and perceptions of the obstacles and recommendations
    Segun J. Showande, Tolulope P. Ibirongbe
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2023; 15(9): 787.     CrossRef
  • To IPAS or not to IPAS? Examining the construct validity of the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale in Hong Kong
    Fraide A. Ganotice, Amy Yin Man Chow, Kelvin Kai Hin Fan, Ui Soon Khoo, May Pui San Lam, Rebecca Po Wah Poon, Francis Hang Sang Tsoi, Michael Ning Wang, George L. Tipoe
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Turkish adaptation of the interprofessional attitude scale (IPAS)
    Mukadder Inci Baser Kolcu, Ozlem Surel Karabilgin Ozturkcu, Giray Kolcu
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(5): 684.     CrossRef
  • Patient participation in interprofessional learning and collaboration with undergraduate health professional students in clinical placements: A scoping review
    Catrine Buck Jensen, Bente Norbye, Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Anita Iversen
    Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice.2022; 27: 100494.     CrossRef
  • Can interprofessional education change students’ attitudes? A case study from Lebanon
    Carine J. Sakr, Lina Fakih, Jocelyn Dejong, Nuhad Yazbick-Dumit, Hussein Soueidan, Wiam Haidar, Elias Boufarhat, Imad Bou Akl
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Impact of interprofessional education on students of the health professions: a systematic review  
Amy Leigh Dyess, Jordyn Shelby Brown, Natasha Dianne Brown, Katherine Merrill Flautt, Lisa Jayroe Barnes
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:33.   Published online October 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.33
  • 13,219 View
  • 475 Download
  • 28 Web of Science
  • 31 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Interprofessional education (IPE) is a concept that allows students from different health professions to learn with and from each other as they gain knowledge about their chosen professions and the professions of their colleagues. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of IPE in the academic preparation of students of the health professions.
Methods
A search was conducted of the PubMed and CINAHL databases using the following eligibility criteria: IPE including students from 3 or more healthcare professions, IPE exposure within academic coursework, measurement of attitudes and/or perceptions as outcomes, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted.
Results
The search yielded 870 total articles. After screening, 7 articles remained for review. All studies reported a positive impact of IPE on the education of students of the health professions.
Conclusion
Evidence showed that IPE activities were an effective tool for improving attitudes toward interdisciplinary teamwork, communication, shared problem-solving, and knowledge and skills in preparation for collaboration within interdisciplinary teams.

Citations

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  • Roles and competencies of nurses and physicians in shared decision‐making in cardiac surgery: A scoping review
    Milou S. H. van Dieën, Wolter Paans, Massimo A. Mariani, Willem Dieperink, Fredrike Blokzijl
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2024; 80(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Ensuring the “health” of a curricular program evaluation: Alignment and analytic quality of two instruments for use in evaluating the effectiveness of an interprofessional collaboration curriculum
    Shannon Sampson, Andrew Nelson, Roberto Cardarelli, Karen L. Roper
    Evaluation and Program Planning.2024; 102: 102377.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of interprofessional education for medical and nursing professionals and students on interprofessional educational outcomes: A systematic review
    Amelia Tan Shuyi, Lew Yi Ting Zikki, Ang Mei Qi, Serena Koh Siew Lin
    Nurse Education in Practice.2024; 74: 103864.     CrossRef
  • Mitigating Wildlife Spillover in the Clinical Setting: How Physicians and Veterinarians Can Help Prevent Future Disease Outbreaks
    Tam Tran, Sherrie Xie
    AJPM Focus.2024; 3(2): 100193.     CrossRef
  • Interpretative phenomenological analysis of the collaboration among healthcare professionals in the nursing home setting
    Crunenberg Robin, Lallemand Alice, Charles Camille, Buret Laetitia, Philippe Geneviève, Ethgen Olivier
    Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy.2024; : 100424.     CrossRef
  • A single institution, cross-sectional study on medical student preferences for collaborators in interprofessional education
    Emily C. Goins, Margaret Coates, Alexander Gordee, Maragatha Kuchibahtla, Kathleen Waite, Erin Leiman
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the impact of interprofessional training wards on patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes: a mixed-methods analysis
    Sophie Schlosser-Hupf, Elisabeth Aichner, Marcus Meier, Sheila Albaladejo-Fuertes, Kirstin Ruttmann, Sophia Rusch, Bernhard Michels, Alexander Mehrl, Claudia Kunst, Stephan Schmid, Martina Müller
    Frontiers in Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Experiences of physical therapists during the COVID-19 pandemic: an interpretive phenomenological analysis
    Marc Campo, Matthew Hyland, Ruth Hansen
    Physiotherapy Theory and Practice.2023; 39(2): 369.     CrossRef
  • Formation des étudiants en pharmacie d’officine et en médecine générale à la communication interprofessionnelle : évaluation d’un programme de simulation
    I. Bodein, M. Forestier, C. Le Borgne, J.-M. Lefebvre, C. Pinçon, A. Garat, A. Standaert, B. Décaudin
    Annales Pharmaceutiques Françaises.2023; 81(2): 354.     CrossRef
  • Nursing handoff education: An integrative literature review
    Anna Le, Mikyoung A. Lee, Jennifer Wilson
    Nurse Education in Practice.2023; 68: 103570.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a newly developed flipped-classroom course on interprofessional practice in health care for medical students
    Anita V. Thomae, Lotte Verweij, Claudia M. Witt, David Blum, Emanuel Feusi, André Fringer, Marion Huber, Melanie Roos, Jasmin Anita Lal, Rahel Naef
    Medical Education Online.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Évaluation de l’apprentissage interprofessionnel au sein du Service sanitaire en période Covid
    Valentin Vaillant, Géraldine Domergue, Gérard Forzy
    Kinésithérapie, la Revue.2023; 23(257): 40.     CrossRef
  • Perceptions of Interprofessional Identity Formation in Recent Doctor of Physical Therapy Graduates: A Phenomenological Study
    Laura Plummer, Keshrie Naidoo
    Education Sciences.2023; 13(7): 674.     CrossRef
  • Students' Perception of Servant Leadership by Physical Therapy Faculty Mentors Is Associated With Interprofessional Socialization
    Brad W. Willis
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2023; 37(4): 314.     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional Education Opportunities and Challenges for Public Health Students
    Wiwik Afridah
    Medical Technology and Public Health Journal.2023; 7(1): 98.     CrossRef
  • Promoting interprofessional education in surgery: development and evaluation of a clinical curriculum
    Eric K. Kim, Roseanne Krauter, Nina W. Zhao
    Global Surgical Education - Journal of the Association for Surgical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pharmacy School Students’ Perceptions of Interprofessional Education
    Han Seul Park, Hyeun Ah Kang, Hyun Jin Kim, Mi Kyong Shim, Hyun Soon Sohn
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2023; 33(3): 186.     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education: a necessity in Alzheimer’s dementia care—a pilot study
    Katharina Dressel, Irene Ablinger, Anna Andrea Lauer, Heike Sabine Grimm, Tobias Hartmann, Carina Hermanns, Marcus Schwarz, Tim Taddey, Marcus Otto Walter Grimm
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nursing students’ experiences of applying problem‐based learning to train the core competence teamwork and collaboration: An interview study
    Camilla Allert, Helén Dellkvist, Markus Hjelm, Ewa K. Andersson
    Nursing Open.2022; 9(1): 569.     CrossRef
  • The effect of ISBARR on knowledge of and attitudes about interprofessional communication skills among Chinese undergraduate nursing students
    Weiwen Wang, Juan Shen, W. Brian Greene, Dianxu Ren, Paula Sherwood
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 109: 105207.     CrossRef
  • Undergraduate-level teaching and learning approaches for interprofessional education in the health professions: a systematic review
    Marwh Gassim Aldriwesh, Sarah Mohammed Alyousif, Nouf Sulaiman Alharbi
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • How does interprofessional education influence students’ perceptions of collaboration in the clinical setting? A qualitative study
    Carolyn Teuwen, Stéphanie van der Burgt, Rashmi Kusurkar, Hermien Schreurs, Hester Daelmans, Saskia Peerdeman
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validation of a Very Brief Assessment of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Skill Gains: ICCAS-Q21
    Patricia J. Ohtake, Daniel J. Kruger, Jessica S. Kruger
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022; 36(4): 311.     CrossRef
  • Enhancing interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education in women’s health
    Laura Baecher-Lind, Angela C. Fleming, Rashmi Bhargava, Susan M. Cox, Elise N. Everett, David A. Forstein, Shireen Madani Sims, Helen K. Morgan, Christopher M. Morosky, Celeste S. Royce, Tammy S. Sonn, Jill M. Sutton, Scott C. Graziano
    Medical Education Online.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Designing Oral Health Curriculum That Facilitates Greater Integration of Oral Health Into Overall Health
    Keith A. Mays
    Frontiers in Dental Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of an Interprofessional Education Model to Influence Students' Perceptions on Interdisciplinary Work
    Eva Swinnen, Maaike Fobelets, Nele Adriaenssens, Ellen Vandyck, Guido Goelen, Elke Moortgat, Dorothée Laforge, Wim Peersman
    Journal of Nursing Education.2021; 60(9): 494.     CrossRef
  • Intraprofessional workplace learning in postgraduate medical education: a scoping review
    Lara Teheux, Ester H. A. J. Coolen, Jos M. T. Draaisma, Marieke de Visser, Nynke D. Scherpbier-de Haan, Wietske Kuijer-Siebelink, Janiëlle A. E. M. van der Velden
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exposing undergraduate medical students to inter-professionalism education in the competency-based curriculum
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, PrateekSaurabh Shrivastava
    MAMC Journal of Medical Sciences.2020; 6(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • A virtual patient model for students’ interprofessional learning in primary healthcare
    Carrie Tran, Eva Toth-Pal, Solvig Ekblad, Uno Fors, Helena Salminen, Elisa J. F. Houwink
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238797.     CrossRef
  • “It’s Not Just About Getting Along”: Exploring Learning Through the Discourse and Practice of Interprofessional Collaboration
    Maria Athina (Tina) Martimianakis, Oshan Fernando, Rayfel Schneider, Shirley Tse, Maria Mylopoulos
    Academic Medicine.2020; 95(11S): S73.     CrossRef
  • Personality and learning styles in relation to attitudes towards interprofessional education: a cross-sectional study on undergraduate medical students during their clinical courses
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Attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates among occupational therapy students in the United States  
Sarah Catherine Tucker, Hon Keung Yuen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:6.   Published online March 25, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.6
  • 18,731 View
  • 311 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was to examine occupational therapy (OT) students’ attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates and validate an instrument used to measure their attitudes.
Methods
OT students (n=128) from one university in Alabama, United States, completed an online survey exploring their attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates, which was assessed using the Rehabilitation Orientation Scale (ROS), a 7-point scale. Dimensional structure, internal consistency reliability, construct validity, and relations to other variables of the ROS was evaluated using factor analyses, Cronbach’s alpha, known-groups method, and univariable correlations, respectively.
Results
Unidimensionality of the ROS was confirmed with an alpha coefficient of 0.90. The mean ROS score of the respondents was 5.1; a score toward 7 indicated a more supportive attitude. About 60% of the respondents reported supportive attitudes (i.e., an ROS score ≥5). Respondents’ ROS scores were significantly higher than those of the public and criminal justice professionals. Female students reported a more supportive attitude than males. Multiple regression analysis indicated that respondents’ consideration of working in prison settings after graduation and their perception that OT has a role in prison settings were significantly associated with support for rehabilitating inmates, after controlling for gender and an acquaintance with someone who has been incarcerated.
Conclusion
Results indicated that the ROS demonstrated adequate psychometric properties as it applied to this population. The majority of respondents reported supportive attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates. Consideration of working in prison settings after graduation and the perception that OT has a role in prison settings were 2 independent factors associated with respondents’ attitudes toward rehabilitating inmates.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Justice-Based Occupational Therapy: A Scoping Review
    Jaime P. Muñoz, Abigail Catalano, Yinao Wang, Gesina A. Phillips
    Annals of International Occupational Therapy.2020; 3(4): 162.     CrossRef
Developing a framework for evaluating the impact of Healthcare Improvement Science Education across Europe: a qualitative study  
Manuel Lillo-Crespo, M. Cristina Sierras-Davó, Rhoda MacRae, Kevin Rooney
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:28.   Published online November 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.28
  • 33,744 View
  • 415 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Frontline healthcare professionals are well positioned to improve the systems in which they work. Educational curricula, however, have not always equipped healthcare professionals with the skills or knowledge to implement and evaluate improvements. It is important to have a robust and standardized framework in order to evaluate the impact of such education in terms of improvement, both within and across European countries. The results of such evaluations will enhance the further development and delivery of healthcare improvement science (HIS) education. We aimed to describe the development and piloting of a framework for prospectively evaluating the impact of HIS education and learning.
Methods
The evaluation framework was designed collaboratively and piloted in 7 European countries following a qualitative methodology. The present study used mixed methods to gather data from students and educators. The framework took the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation as a theoretical reference.
Results
The framework was found to be feasible and acceptable for use across differing European higher education contexts according to the pilot study and the participants’ consensus. It can be used effectively to evaluate and develop HIS education across European higher education institutions.
Conclusion
We offer a new evaluation framework to capture the impact of HIS education. The implementation of this tool has the potential to facilitate the continuous development of HIS education.

Citations

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  • Evaluation of cost-effectiveness of single-credit traffic safety course based on Kirkpatrick model: a case study of Iran
    Mina Golestani, Homayoun Sadeghi-bazargani, Sepideh Harzand-Jadidi, Hamid Soori
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Yemen Advanced Field Epidemiology Training Program: An Impact Evaluation, 2021
    Maeen Abduljalil, Abdulhakeem Al Kohlani, Aisha Jumaan, Abdulwahed Al Serouri
    Epidemiologia.2023; 4(3): 235.     CrossRef
  • How, and under what contexts, do academic–practice partnerships collaborate to implement healthcare improvement education into preregistration nursing curriculums: a realist review protocol
    Lorraine Armstrong, Chris Moir, Peta Taylor
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(10): e077784.     CrossRef
  • Developing the American College of Surgeons Quality Improvement Framework to Evaluate Local Surgical Improvement Efforts
    Clifford Y. Ko, Tejen Shah, Heidi Nelson, Avery B. Nathens
    JAMA Surgery.2022; 157(8): 737.     CrossRef
  • Kirkpatrick Model: Its Limitations as Used in Higher Education Evaluation
    Michael CAHAPAY
    International Journal of Assessment Tools in Education.2021; 8(1): 135.     CrossRef
  • Transforming the Future Healthcare Workforce across Europe through Improvement Science Training: A Qualitative Approach
    Maria Cristina Sierras-Davo, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdu, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(3): 1298.     CrossRef
  • Qualitative evaluation of an educational intervention about healthcare improvement for nursing students
    María Cristina Sierras-Davó, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdú Rodríguez
    Aquichan.2021; 21(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Advanced Field Epidemiology Training Programs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: A Multi-Country Study
    Mohannad Al Nsour, Yousef Khader, Haitham Bashier, Majd Alsoukhni
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Paola Dey, Jeremy Brown, John Sandars, Yvonne Young, Ruth Ruggles, Samantha Bracebridge
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  • Mapping the Status of Healthcare Improvement Science through a Narrative Review in Six European Countries
    Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Maria Cristina Sierras-Davó, Alan Taylor, Katrina Ritters, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(22): 4480.     CrossRef
Educational/Faculty Development Material
Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative  
Lisa J. Barnes, Robin Parish
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:4.   Published online March 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.4
  • 33,255 View
  • 348 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a threestep process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

Citations

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  • Elevating Academic Advising: Natural Language Processing of Student Reviews
    Omiros Iatrellis, Nicholas Samaras, Konstantinos Kokkinos, Apostolis Xenakis
    Applied System Innovation.2024; 7(1): 12.     CrossRef
  • Preparing Students for Change: An Advisement Seminar Informed by Tolman and Kremling’s Integrated Model of Student Resistance
    Jeni Dulek, Michelle Gorenberg, Kaylinn Hill, Kelsey Walsh, Molly Perkins
    Occupational Therapy In Health Care.2023; 37(1): 164.     CrossRef
  • Making a Case for Faculty Advisor–Advisee Concordant Pairs
    Joyce Addo-Atuah, Heidi Fuchs, Jaclyn Tetenbaum-Novatt, Abraham M. Jeger
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2023; 87(12): 100138.     CrossRef
  • The Use of Quality Improvement in the Physical Therapy Literature: A Scoping Review
    James P. Crick, Timothy J. Rethorn, Tyler A. Beauregard, Riley Summers, Zachary D. Rethorn, Catherine C. Quatman-Yates
    Journal for Healthcare Quality.2023; 45(5): 280.     CrossRef
  • Student perception of academic advising in a school of pharmacy
    Caroline M Sierra, Jessa Koch, Jody Gonzalez, Khaled Bahjri
    International Journal of Pharmacy Practice.2022; 30(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Problematic Internet Use and Social-Appearance Anxiety on the Smartphone Addiction of Adolescents
    Özlem Şensoy, Dijle Ayar
    Cyprus Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 7(3): 354.     CrossRef
  • Academic advising in undergraduate education: A systematic review
    Zenobia C.Y. Chan, Ho Yan Chan, Hang Chak Jason Chow, Sze Nga Choy, Ka Yan Ng, Koon Yiu Wong, Pui Kan Yu
    Nurse Education Today.2019; 75: 58.     CrossRef
  • Scoping review of mentoring research in the occupational therapy literature, 2002–2018
    Nancy W. Doyle, Liat Gafni Lachter, Karen Jacobs
    Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.2019; 66(5): 541.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Is a decentralized continuing medical education program feasible for Chinese rural health professionals?  
Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:18.   Published online April 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.18
  • 29,439 View
  • 156 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Rural health professionals in township health centers (THCs) tend to have less advanced educational degrees. This study aimed to ascertain the perceived feasibility of a decentralized continuing medical education (CME) program to upgrade their educational levels. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of THC health professionals was conducted using a self-administered, structured questionnaire in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. Results: The health professionals in the THCs were overwhelmingly young with low education levels. They had a strong desire to upgrade their educational degrees. The decentralized CME program was perceived as feasible by health workers with positive attitudes about the benefit for license examination, and by those who intended to improve their clinical diagnosis and treatment skills. The target groups of such a program were those who expected to undertake a bachelor’s degree and who rated themselves as “partially capable” in clinical competency. They reported that 160-400 USD annually would be an affordable fee for the program. Conclusion: A decentralized CME program was perceived feasible to upgrade rural health workers’ education level to a bachelor’s degree and improve their clinical competency.

Citations

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  • Evaluation of the star family doctors training program: an observational cohort study of a novel continuing medical education program for general practitioners within a compact medical consortium: a quantitative analysis
    Ling-Bo Liang, Xu Li, Xiang-Ping Liu, Cai-Zheng Li, Dan Luo, Feng Liu, Ting-Rui Mao, Qiao-Li Su
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ling Chen, Jie Liu, Zhihui Zheng, Sangphel Yeshi
    Australian Journal of Rural Health.2021; 29(4): 578.     CrossRef
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    Jinlin Liu, Ying Mao
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(8): e037985.     CrossRef
  • A Checklist for Implementing Rural Pathways to Train, Develop and Support Health Workers in Low and Middle-Income Countries
    Belinda O'Sullivan, Bruce Chater, Amie Bingham, John Wynn-Jones, Ian Couper, Nagwa Nashat Hegazy, Raman Kumar, Henry Lawson, Viviana Martinez-Bianchi, Sankha Randenikumara, James Rourke, Sarah Strasser, Paul Worley
    Frontiers in Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yan Mo, Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi, Yanping Ying, Huiqiao Huang, Zhongxian Huang, Jiafeng Lin
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A job analysis of care helpers
Su Jin Shin, Kyung-Sook Choi, Seungeun Jeong, Seulgee Kim, Hyeung-Keun Park, Jae Eun Seok
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:2.   Published online January 10, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.2
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study was to examine the roles of care helpers through job analysis. To do this, this study used the Developing A Curriculum Method (DACUM) to classify job content and a multi-dimensional study design was applied to identify roles and create a job description by looking into the appropriateness, significance, frequency, and difficulty of job content as identified through workshops and cross-sectional surveys conducted for appropriateness verification. A total of 418 care helpers working in nursing facilities and community senior service facilities across the country were surveyed. The collected data were analyzed using PASW 18.0 software. Six duties and 18 tasks were identified based on the job model. Most tasks were found to be ?占퐄mportant task?? scoring 4.0 points or above. Physical care duties, elimination care, position changing and movement assistance, feeding assistance, and safety care were identified as high frequency tasks. The most difficult tasks were emergency prevention, early detection, and speedy reporting. A summary of the job of care helpers is providing physical, emotional, housekeeping, and daily activity assistance to elderly patients with problems in independently undertaking daily activities due to physical or mental causes in long-term care facilities or at the client?占퐏 home. The results of this study suggest a task-focused examination, optimizing the content of the current standard teaching materials authorized by the Ministry of Health and Welfare while supplementing some content which was identified as task elements but not included in the current teaching materials and fully reflecting the actual frequency and difficulty of tasks.

Citations

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions