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Research articles
Relationships between undergraduate medical students’ attitudes toward communication skills learning and demographics in Zambia: a survey-based descriptive study  
Mercy Ijeoma Okwudili Ezeala, John Volk
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:16.   Published online June 1, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.16
  • 1,350 View
  • 85 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to detect relationships between undergraduate students’ attitudes toward communication skills learning and demographic variables (such as age, academic year, and gender). Understanding these relationships could provide information for communication skills facilitators and curriculum planners on structuring course delivery and integrating communication skills training into the medical curriculum.
Methods
The descriptive study involved a survey of 369 undergraduate students from 2 medical schools in Zambia who participated in communication skills training stratified by academic year using the Communication Skills Attitude Scale. Data were collected between October and December 2021 and analyzed using IBM SPSS for Windows version 28.0.
Results
One-way analysis of variance revealed a significant difference in attitude between at least 5 academic years. There was a significant difference in attitudes between the 2nd and 5th academic years (t=5.95, P˂0.001). No significant difference in attitudes existed among the academic years on the negative subscale; the 2nd and 3rd (t=3.82, P=0.004), 4th (t=3.61, P=0.011), 5th (t=8.36, P˂0.001), and 6th (t=4.20, P=0.001) academic years showed significant differences on the positive subscale. Age showed no correlation with attitudes. There was a more favorable attitude to learning communication skills among the women participants than among the men participants (P=0.006).
Conclusion
Despite positive general attitudes toward learning communication skills, the difference in attitude between the genders, academic years 2 and 5, and the subsequent classes suggest a re-evaluation of the curriculum and teaching methods to facilitate appropriate course structure according to the academic years and a learning process that addressees gender differences.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Attitudes toward learning communication skills among Iranian medical students
    Naser Yousefzadeh Kandevani, Ali Labaf, Azim Mirzazadeh, Pegah Salimi Pormehr
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
Students’ performance of and perspective on an objective structured practical examination for the assessment of preclinical and practical skills in biomedical laboratory science students in Sweden: a 5-year longitudinal study  
Catharina Hultgren, Annica Lindkvist, Sophie Curbo, Maura Heverin
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:13.   Published online April 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.13
  • 1,369 View
  • 118 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aims to find students’ performance of and perspectives on an objective structured practical examination (OSPE) for assessment of laboratory and preclinical skills in biomedical laboratory science (BLS). It also aims to investigate the perception, acceptability, and usefulness of OSPE from the students’ and examiners’ point of view.
Methods
This was a longitudinal study to implement an OSPE in BLS. The student group consisted of 198 BLS students enrolled in semester 4, 2015–2019 at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Sweden. Fourteen teachers evaluated the performance by completing a checklist and global rating scales. A student survey questionnaire was administered to the participants to evaluate the student perspective. To assess quality, 4 independent observers were included to monitor the examiners.
Results
Almost 50% of the students passed the initial OSPE. During the repeat OSPE, 73% of the students passed the OSPE. There was a statistically significant difference between the first and the second repeat OSPE (P<0.01) but not between the first and the third attempt (P=0.09). The student survey questionnaire was completed by 99 of the 198 students (50%) and only 63 students responded to the free-text questions (32%). According to these responses, some stations were perceived as more difficult, albeit they considered the assessment to be valid. The observers found the assessment protocols and examiner’s instructions assured the objectivity of the examination.
Conclusion
The introduction of an OSPE in the education of biomedical laboratory scientists was a reliable, and useful examination of practical skills.
Possibility of independent use of the yes/no Angoff and Hofstee methods for the standard setting of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination written test: a descriptive study  
Do-Hwan Kim, Ye Ji Kang, Hoon-Ki Park
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:33.   Published online December 12, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.33
  • 1,727 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aims to apply the yes/no Angoff and Hofstee methods to actual Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE) 2022 written examination data to estimate cut scores for the written KMLE.
Methods
Fourteen panelists gathered to derive the cut score of the 86th KMLE written examination data using the yes/no Angoff method. The panel reviewed the items individually before the meeting and shared their respective understanding of the minimum-competency physician. The standard setting process was conducted in 5 rounds over a total of 800 minutes. In addition, 2 rounds of the Hofstee method were conducted before starting the standard setting process and after the second round of yes/no Angoff.
Results
For yes/no Angoff, as each round progressed, the panel’s opinion gradually converged to a cut score of 198 points, and the final passing rate was 95.1%. The Hofstee cut score was 208 points out of a maximum 320 with a passing rate of 92.1% at the first round. It scored 204 points with a passing rate of 93.3% in the second round.
Conclusion
The difference between the cut scores obtained through yes/no Angoff and Hofstee methods did not exceed 2% points, and they were within the range of cut scores from previous studies. In both methods, the difference between the panelists decreased as rounds were repeated. Overall, our findings suggest the acceptability of cut scores and the possibility of independent use of both methods.

Citations

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  • Issues in the 3rd year of the COVID-19 pandemic, including computer-based testing, study design, ChatGPT, journal metrics, and appreciation to reviewers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 5.     CrossRef
  • Presidential address: improving item validity and adopting computer-based testing, clinical skills assessments, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality in health professions licensing examinations in Korea
    Hyunjoo Pai
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 8.     CrossRef
Equal Z standard-setting method to estimate the minimum number of panelists for a medical school’s objective structured clinical examination in Taiwan: a simulation study  
Ying-Ying Yang, Pin-Hsiang Huang, Ling-Yu Yang, Chia-Chang Huang, Chih-Wei Liu, Shiau-Shian Huang, Chen-Huan Chen, Fa-Yauh Lee, Shou-Yen Kao, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:27.   Published online October 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.27
  • 1,752 View
  • 117 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Undertaking a standard-setting exercise is a common method for setting pass/fail cut scores for high-stakes examinations. The recently introduced equal Z standard-setting method (EZ method) has been found to be a valid and effective alternative for the commonly used Angoff and Hofstee methods and their variants. The current study aims to estimate the minimum number of panelists required for obtaining acceptable and reliable cut scores using the EZ method.
Methods
The primary data were extracted from 31 panelists who used the EZ method for setting cut scores for a 12-station of medical school’s final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in Taiwan. For this study, a new data set composed of 1,000 random samples of different panel sizes, ranging from 5 to 25 panelists, was established and analyzed. Analysis of variance was performed to measure the differences in the cut scores set by the sampled groups, across all sizes within each station.
Results
On average, a panel of 10 experts or more yielded cut scores with confidence more than or equal to 90% and 15 experts yielded cut scores with confidence more than or equal to 95%. No significant differences in cut scores associated with panel size were identified for panels of 5 or more experts.
Conclusion
The EZ method was found to be valid and feasible. Less than an hour was required for 12 panelists to assess 12 OSCE stations. Calculating the cut scores required only basic statistical skills.
Changes in academic performance in the online, integrated system-based curriculum implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic in a medical school in Korea  
Do-Hwan Kim, Hyo Jeong Lee, Yanyan Lin, Ye Ji Kang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:24.   Published online September 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.24
  • 5,921 View
  • 313 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study examined how students’ academic performance changed after undergoing a transition to online learning during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, based on the test results of 16 integrated courses conducted in 3 semesters at Hanyang University College of Medicine in Korea.
Methods
For the 16 required courses that formed an integrated system-based curriculum running for 3 semesters, the major examinations’ raw scores were collected for each student. Percent-correct scores were used in the subsequent analysis. We used the t-test to compare grades between 2019 and 2020, and the Cohen D was calculated as a measure of effect size. The correlation of scores between courses was calculated using Pearson correlation coefficients.
Results
There was a significant decrease in scores in 2020 for 10 courses (62.5%). While most of the integrated system-based curriculum test scores showed strong correlations, with coefficients of 0.6 or higher in both 2019 and 2020, the correlation coefficients were generally higher in 2020. When students were divided into low, middle, and high achievement groups, low-achieving students consistently showed declining test scores in all 3 semesters.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that the transition to online classes due to COVID-19 has led to an overall decline in academic performance. This overall decline, which may occur when the curriculum is centered on recorded lectures, needs to be addressed. Further, medical schools need to consider establishing a support system for the academic development of low-achieving students.

Citations

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  • Study delay during emergency remote teaching among students at Dutch universities: the role of students’ education satisfaction and academic wellbeing
    Manja Vollmann, Renée A. Scheepers, Femke Hilverda
    European Journal of Psychology of Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and ensuing online teaching on pre-clinical medical education
    Houman Goudarzi, Masahiro Onozawa, Makoto Takahashi
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Grace Melo, Diego Monteza, Sandra Acosta
    Cogent Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The nationwide impact of COVID-19 on life support courses. A retrospective evaluation by Resuscitation Council UK
    C.J. Thorne, P.K. Kimani, S. Hampshire, I. Hamilton-Bower, S. Begum-Ali, A. Benson-Clarke, K. Couper, J. Yeung, A. Lockey, G.D. Perkins, J. Soar
    Resuscitation Plus.2023; 13: 100366.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 and Living Situation: Effects on University of Michigan Students During the 2020-2021 Academic Year
    Barbara Tan, Alyssa Cadez-Martin, Sarah Fox Fox, Samir Gadepalli
    University of Michigan Undergraduate Research Journal.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • How successful the online assessment techniques in distance learning have been, in contributing to academic achievements of management undergraduates?
    Hiruni Thathsarani, Dinushika Kaushalya Ariyananda, Chalani Jayakody, Kerthiga Manoharan, A.A.S.N Munasinghe, Nilmini Rathnayake
    Education and Information Technologies.2023; 28(11): 14091.     CrossRef
  • Academic performance and mental health among Chinese middle and high school students after the lifting of COVID-19 restrictions
    Hong-Jun Song, Yun-Fei Mu, Cong Wang, Jia Cai, Zhong-Yue Deng, Ai-Ping Deng, Xue-Hua Huang, Xian-Dong Meng, Lan Zhang, Yi Huang, Wei Zhang, Wen-Wu Shen, Jin Chen, Bo Liu, Ru Gao, Jun-Shu Zhao, Mao-Sheng Ran
    Frontiers in Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • HOW DID ONLINE LEARNING AFFECT PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC?
    Muhammet Fatih BULUT, Aybüke Cansu KALKAN, Arzu GENÇ, Seher ÖZYÜREK
    SDÜ Tıp Fakültesi Dergisi.2023; 30(4): 652.     CrossRef
  • The impact of asynchronous online anatomy teaching and smaller learning groups in the anatomy laboratory on medical students’ performance during the Covid‐19 pandemic
    Ming‐Fong Chang, Meng‐Lin Liao, June‐Horng Lue, Chi‐Chuan Yeh
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2022; 15(3): 476.     CrossRef
  • Educational impact of an active learning session with 6-lead mobile electrocardiography on medical students’ knowledge of cardiovascular physiology during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States: a survey-based observational study
    Alexandra Camille Greb, Emma Altieri, Irene Masini, Emily Helena Frisch, Milton Leon Greenberg
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 12.     CrossRef
  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 Cases at Universities and Colleges in Seoul Metropolitan Area
    Young June Choe, Yun-Kyung Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief report
Feasibility of clinical performance assessment of medical students on a virtual sub-internship in the United States  
John Woller, Sean Tackett, Ariella Apfel, Janet Record, Danelle Cayea, Shannon Walker, Amit Pahwa
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:12.   Published online June 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.12
  • 4,825 View
  • 292 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
We aimed to determine whether it was feasible to assess medical students as they completed a virtual sub-internship. Six students (out of 31 who completed an in-person sub-internship) participated in a 2-week virtual sub-internship, caring for patients remotely. Residents and attendings assessed those 6 students in 15 domains using the same assessment measures from the in-person sub-internship. Raters marked “unable to assess” in 75/390 responses (19%) for the virtual sub-internship versus 88/3,405 (2.6%) for the in-person sub-internship (P=0.01), most frequently for the virtual sub-internship in the domains of the physical examination (21, 81%), rapport with patients (18, 69%), and compassion (11, 42%). Students received complete assessments in most areas. Scores were higher for the in-person than the virtual sub-internship (4.67 vs. 4.45, P<0.01) for students who completed both. Students uniformly rated the virtual clerkship positively. Students can be assessed in many domains in the context of a virtual sub-internship.

Citations

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  • Association of Virtual Away Rotations With Residency Applicant Outcomes in Otolaryngology
    Nicholas R. Lenze, William J. Benjamin, Lauren A. Bohm, Marc C. Thorne, Michael J. Brenner, Angela P. Mihalic, Robbi A. Kupfer
    OTO Open.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review
A proposal for the future of medical education accreditation in Korea  
Ki-Young Lim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:32.   Published online October 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.32
  • 4,618 View
  • 123 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
For the past 20 years, the medical education accreditation program of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation (KIMEE) has contributed significantly to the standardization and improvement of the quality of basic medical education in Korea. It should now contribute to establishing and promoting the future of medical education. The Accreditation Standards of KIMEE 2019 (ASK2019) have been adopted since 2019, with the goal of achieving world-class medical education by applying a learner-centered curriculum using a continuum framework for the 3 phases of formal medical education: basic medical education, postgraduate medical education, and continuing professional development. ASK2019 will also be able to promote medical education that meets community needs and employs systematic assessments throughout the education process. These are important changes that can be used to gauge the future of the medical education accreditation system. Furthermore, globalization, inter-professional education, health systems science, and regular self-assessment systems are emerging as essential topics for the future of medical education. It is time for the medical education accreditation system in Korea to observe and adopt new trends in global medical education.

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  • Analyzing the characteristics of mission statements in Korean medical schools based on the Korean Doctor’s Role framework
    Ye Ji Kang, Soomin Lee, Hyo Jeong Lee, Do-Hwan Kim
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2024; 36(1): 99.     CrossRef
  • Challenges and potential improvements in the Accreditation Standards of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation 2019 (ASK2019) derived through meta-evaluation: a cross-sectional study
    Yoonjung Lee, Min-jung Lee, Junmoo Ahn, Chungwon Ha, Ye Ji Kang, Cheol Woong Jung, Dong-Mi Yoo, Jihye Yu, Seung-Hee Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2024; 21: 8.     CrossRef
  • Accreditation standards items of post-2nd cycle related to the decision of accreditation of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation
    Kwi Hwa Park, Geon Ho Lee, Su Jin Chae, Seong Yong Kim
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2023; 35(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Continuing Professional Development of Pharmacists and The Roles of Pharmacy Schools
    Hyemin Park, Jeong-Hyun Yoon
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2022; 32(4): 281.     CrossRef
  • Definition of character for medical education based on expert opinions in Korea
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 26.     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
Software report
Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:8.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.8
  • 7,935 View
  • 231 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine whether a computer simulation of practical exercises in undergraduate medical pharmacology led to the realization of the intended learning outcomes.
Methods
The study was a descriptive analysis of laboratory classes carried out using computer simulation programs. Five programs were used to teach practical pharmacology to undergraduate medical students at the Mulungushi University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The study period was January 2018 to December 2019. The computer programs included a pharmacokinetics simulator (CyberPatient), organ bath simulator (OBSim), AutonomiCAL for simulating autonomic pharmacology, and Virtual Cat and Virtual Rat (RatCVS) for simulating cardiovascular pharmacology. Students utilized these programs during their pharmacology laboratory classes, wrote reports, and answered relevant clinical questions.
Results
The 5 programs provided easy and precise platforms for students to explore concepts and demonstrate knowledge of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology, and their clinical applications.
Conclusion
The programs were effective learning tools. Students’ learning was easily assessed based on their laboratory reports. Although the computer programs met medical students’ learning needs, wet laboratory exercises are also needed to meet the needs of students who require practical laboratory skills.

Citations

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  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
Research articles
Ophthalmology training and competency levels in caring for patients with ophthalmic complaints among United States internal medicine, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents  
Christopher Daniel Gelston, Jennifer Landrigan Patnaik
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:25.   Published online August 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.25
  • 11,104 View
  • 151 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
To evaluate ophthalmic educational training and confidence in caring for patients with ophthalmic complaints among internal, emergency, and family medicine residents in the United States.
Methods
A 41-item cross-sectional survey was sent to the directors of 529 internal medicine, 237 emergency medicine, and 629 family medicine residency programs, who distributed it to residents in those programs. The survey included the number of ophthalmic education hours residents received. Respondents were asked to rate their confidence in performing an ophthalmic exam and treating patients with ocular conditions using a 5-point Likert scale ranging from “not confident” to “very confident.”
Results
In total, 92.5% of internal medicine, 66.8% of emergency medicine, and 74.5% of family medicine residents received less than 10 hours of ophthalmic education during residency. Most respondents (internal medicine, 59.1%; emergency medicine, 76.0%; family medicine, 65.7%) reported that patients with ocular complaints constituted 1%–5% of visits. Mean±standard deviation confidence levels in performing an eye exam and treating patients with ophthalmic conditions were highest in emergency medicine residency programs (2.9±0.7), followed by family medicine (2.3±0.6) and internal medicine (2.2±0.6). A higher reported number of ophthalmic education hours in residency was associated with greater confidence among emergency (P<0.001), family (P<0.001), and internal (P=0.005) medicine residents.
Conclusion
Internal, emergency, and family medicine residents receive limited ophthalmic education, as reflected by their overall low confidence levels in performing an ophthalmic exam and treating patients with ocular complaints. An increase in ophthalmic educational hours during their residencies is recommended to improve upon this knowledge gap.

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  • Evaluating patient flow through an emergency ophthalmology consult service in a tertiary care academic centre in Quebec
    Emmanuel Issa Nassrallah, Zoya Chaudhry, Georges Nassrallah, Zainab Khan
    Canadian Journal of Ophthalmology.2024; 59(2): e111.     CrossRef
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    Mohammad Delsoz, Yeganeh Madadi, Hina Raja, Wuqaas M. Munir, Brendan Tamm, Shiva Mehravaran, Mohammad Soleimani, Ali Djalilian, Siamak Yousefi
    Cornea.2024; 43(5): 664.     CrossRef
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    Ling-Chun Sun, Shu-I. Pao, Ke-Hao Huang, Chih-Yuan Wei, Ke-Feng Lin, Ping-Nan Chen
    Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology.2023; 261(5): 1399.     CrossRef
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    A. Itzam Marin, Helio Neves da Silva, Hongan Chen, Nihaal Mehta, Linh K. Nguyen, Jeffrey R. SooHoo, Jennifer E. Adams, Jasleen K. Singh
    Journal of Academic Ophthalmology.2022; 14(02): e209.     CrossRef
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    Nickolas E Srica, Ryan Walsh, Joseph Sikon, Lawrence Stack
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    Sally S.E. Park, Rohin Vij, Jeff Wu, Bryan Zarrin, Jee-Young Moon, Jason Oliveira, Jeffrey S. Schultz, Anurag Shrivastava
    Journal of Academic Ophthalmology.2022; 14(02): e229.     CrossRef
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    David Cui, Andreas M. Wingert, Ingrid U. Scott
    Journal of Academic Ophthalmology.2021; 13(02): e129.     CrossRef
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Factors influencing the career preferences of medical students and interns: a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey from India  
Ruban Anand, Prakash Somi Sankaran
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:12.   Published online May 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.12
  • 17,327 View
  • 381 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The study aimed to identify the motivational factors and demographic variables influencing the career preferences of medical students in India.
Methods
We conducted a questionnaire-based survey at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. The participants were 368 of the 460 medical students and interns enrolled at the institution from October 2015 to August 2016. We designed the questionnaire to collect demographic data, students’ preferences for career specialties, and the motivational factors influencing them. Then, we analyzed the influence of these factors and demographic variables on career preferences using regression analysis.
Results
Of the 368 respondents, 356 (96.7%) expressed their intention to pursue a residency program after the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program, and about two-thirds indicated their preference to do so in India. The specialties most preferred by students were general surgery, general medicine (internal medicine), and pediatrics, while the least preferred were anatomy, obstetrics and gynecology, and community medicine. Factor analysis yielded three motivational factors, which we named ‘personal growth,’ ‘professional growth,’ and ‘personal satisfaction’ based on the items loaded in each. The motivational factors were predicted by demographic variables (gender, geographical background, current stage in the MBBS program, and the presence of relatives in the health professions). Demographic variables and the motivational factors also had significant influences on career preferences.
Conclusion
This study provides insights into the motivational factors that influence the career preferences of Indian medical students and interns. A robust longitudinal study would be required to study intra-individual variations in preferences and the persistence of choices.

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  • Medical students’ career preferences in Bangladesh
    Mohammad Azmain Iktidar, Md Muid Sakib, Ummi Rukaiya Munni, Fahmida Hoque Rimti, Renessa Yousuf, Koushik Majumder, Tirtha Saha, Farhat Lamisa Golpo, Md Samee U Sayed, Sabrina Monsur, Asadul Al Galib, Md Kamran Hossain, Sigma Alam Shupti, Noshin Nawar, Sud
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    Wen Li, Hong Sun, Asaduzzaman Khan, Robyn Gillies
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    Philipp Linde, Marie Klein, Frauke Lang, Simone Wegen, Cordula Petersen, Hendrik Dapper, Jiaqi Fan, Eren Celik, Simone Marnitz, Christian Baues
    Strahlentherapie und Onkologie.2023; 199(4): 360.     CrossRef
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    Wen Li, Robyn M. Gillies, Chang Liu, Changhao Wu, Jiayi Chen, Xiaoning Zhang, Bin Cheng, Jing Dai, Ning Fu, Lin Li, Shenjun Liu, Hong Sun
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Muhammad Maaz Arif, Wardah Nisar , Khadija Agha , Muzammil Ghaffar Qureshi, Amen Mansoor, Asad Ullah Malik, Muhammad Sohaib Khokhar, Fatima Awan, Sarah Irfan Khwaja, Aqsa Parveen
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    Pritha Roy, Abhishek Basu, Debdeep Samaddar, Hambir Chowdhury
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Brief report
The implementation and evaluation of an e-Learning training module for objective structured clinical examination raters in Canada  
Karima Khamisa, Samantha Halman, Isabelle Desjardins, Mireille St. Jean, Debra Pugh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:18.   Published online August 6, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.18
  • 22,946 View
  • 255 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Improving the reliability and consistency of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) raters’ marking poses a continual challenge in medical education. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an e-Learning training module for OSCE raters who participated in the assessment of third-year medical students at the University of Ottawa, Canada. The effects of online training and those of traditional in-person (face-to-face) orientation were compared. Of the 90 physicians recruited as raters for this OSCE, 60 consented to participate (67.7%) in the study in March 2017. Of the 60 participants, 55 rated students during the OSCE, while the remaining 5 were back-up raters. The number of raters in the online training group was 41, while that in the traditional in-person training group was 19. Of those with prior OSCE experience (n= 18) who participated in the online group, 13 (68%) reported that they preferred this format to the in-person orientation. The total average time needed to complete the online module was 15 minutes. Furthermore, 89% of the participants felt the module provided clarity in the rater training process. There was no significant difference in the number of missing ratings based on the type of orientation that raters received. Our study indicates that online OSCE rater training is comparable to traditional face-to-face orientation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Assessment methods and the validity and reliability of measurement tools in online objective structured clinical examinations: a systematic scoping review
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 11.     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • No observed effect of a student-led mock objective structured clinical examination on subsequent performance scores in medical students in Canada
    Lorenzo Madrazo, Claire Bo Lee, Meghan McConnell, Karima Khamisa, Debra Pugh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 14.     CrossRef
  • ОБ’ЄКТИВНИЙ СТРУКТУРОВАНИЙ КЛІНІЧНИЙ ІСПИТ ЯК ВИМІР ПРАКТИЧНОЇ ПІДГОТОВКИ МАЙБУТНЬОГО ЛІКАРЯ
    M. M. Korda, A. H. Shulhai, N. V. Pasyaka, N. V. Petrenko, N. V. Haliyash, N. A. Bilkevich
    Медична освіта.2019; (3): 19.     CrossRef
Research articles
Efficacy of an asynchronous electronic curriculum in emergency medicine education in the United States  
Alisa Wray, Kathryn Bennett, Megan Boysen-Osborn, Warren Wiechmann, Shannon Toohey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:29.   Published online December 11, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.29
  • 31,757 View
  • 241 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to measure the effect of an iPad-based asynchronous curriculum on emergency medicine resident performance on the in-training exam (ITE). We hypothesized that the implementation of an asynchronous curriculum (replacing 1 hour of weekly didactic time) would result in non-inferior ITE scores compared to the historical scores of residents who had participated in the traditional 5-hour weekly didactic curriculum.
Methods
The study was a retrospective, non-inferiority study. conducted at the University of California, Irvine Emergency Medicine Residency Program. We compared ITE scores from 2012 and 2013, when there were 5 weekly hours of didactic content, with scores from 2014 and 2015, when 1 hour of conference was replaced with asynchro-nous content. Examination results were compared using a non-inferiority data analysis with a 10% margin of difference.
Results
Using a non-inferiority test with a 95% confidence interval, there was no difference between the 2 groups (before and after implementation of asynchronous learning), as the confidence interval for the change of the ITE was −3.5 to 2.3 points, whereas the 10% non-inferiority margin was 7.8 points.
Conclusion
Replacing 1 hour of didactic conference with asynchronous learning showed no negative impact on resident ITE scores.

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    Emily L Jameyfield, Semhar Tesfai, Alejandro A Palma, Adriana S Olson
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Does the acceptance of hybrid learning affect learning approaches in France?  
Lionel Di Marco, Alain Venot, Pierre Gillois
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:24.   Published online October 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.24
  • 31,025 View
  • 239 Download
  • 14 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Acceptance of a learning technology affects students’ intention to use that technology, but the influence of the acceptance of a learning technology on learning approaches has not been investigated in the literature. A deep learning approach is important in the field of health, where links must be created between skills, knowledge, and habits. Our hypothesis was that acceptance of a hybrid learning model would affect students’ way of learning.
Methods
We analysed these concepts, and their correlations, in the context of a flipped classroom method using a local learning management system. In a sample of all students within a single year of study in the midwifery program (n= 38), we used 3 validated scales to evaluate these concepts (the Study Process Questionnaire, My Intellectual Work Tools, and the Hybrid E-Learning Acceptance Model: Learner Perceptions).
Results
Our sample had a positive acceptance of the learning model, but a neutral intention to use it. Students reported that they were distractible during distance learning. They presented a better mean score for the deep approach than for the superficial approach (P< 0.001), which is consistent with their declared learning strategies (personal reorganization of information; search and use of examples). There was no correlation between poor acceptance of the learning model and inadequate learning approaches. The strategy of using deep learning techniques was moderately correlated with acceptance of the learning model (rs= 0.42, P= 0.03).
Conclusion
Learning approaches were not affected by acceptance of a hybrid learning model, due to the flexibility of the tool. However, we identified problems in the students’ time utilization, which explains their neutral intention to use the system.

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    Elizabeth Ann Florence, Tammi Kolski
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    Fares Gouzi, François Bughin, Lucie Barateau, Agathe Hubert, Savine Volland, Dalila Laoudj-Chenivesse, Emilie Passerieux, Régis Lopez, Antonia Perez-Martin, Iris Schuster-Beck, Stephan Matecki, Michel Dauzat, Yves Dauvilliers, Maurice Hayot, Jacques Merci
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Research Article
Does curricular change improve faculty perceptions of student experiences with the educational environment? A preliminary study in an institution undergoing curricular change  
Syed Ilyas Shehnaz, Jayadevan Sreedharan, Kadayam Guruswami Gomathi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:7.   Published online April 26, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.7
  • 26,917 View
  • 152 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
College of Medicine, Gulf Medical University, United Arab Emirates, underwent a major curriculum change from a discipline-based to an organ system-based integrated curriculum. However, it was not known how the faculty perceived the changes in the educational environment as experienced by the students. In this context, we aimed to compare the faculty perceptions of the student experiences in the discipline-based curriculum with those in the organ system-based integrated curriculum.
Methods
The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was modified to assess faculty perceptions of the student experiences, pilot-tested, and administered to all faculty members (n=28) involved in the discipline-based curriculum (FDC) in January 2009. In the subsequent year, data were collected from the same faculty involved in the new integrated curriculum (FIC). Collected data were transferred to Predictive Analytics Software version 18. Total, domain, and individual statement scores were assessed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Percentage agreement, disagreement, and uncertainty were assessed by the McNemar’s test for proportion.
Results
The mean total DREEM score was significantly higher (P<0.001) for FIC (139/200) as compared to FDC (119/200). The FIC perceived significantly more positive student experiences with the educational environment as indicated by the domain scores and statement scores. The differences in proportions of agreement between FIC and FDC also reinforced that the FIC perceived more positive student experiences with the educational environment.
Conclusion
The study showed that the faculty perceived the organ system-based integrated curriculum as providing a better educational environment for the students than the discipline based curriculum.
Brief Report
Conducting correlation seminars in basic sciences at KIST Medical College, Nepal
P. Ravi Shankar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2011;8:10.   Published online October 17, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2011.8.10
  • 27,466 View
  • 135 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
KIST Medical College is a new medical school in Lalitpur, Nepal. In Nepal, six basic science subjects are taught together in an integrated organ system-based manner with early clinical exposure and community medicine. Correlation seminars are conducted at the end of covering each organ system. The topics are decided by the core academic group (consisting of members from each basic science department, the Department of Community Medicine, the academic director, and the clinical and program coordinators) considering the public health importance of the condition and its ability to include learning objectives from a maximum number of subjects. The learning objectives are decided by individual departments and finalized after the meeting of the core group. There are two student coordinators for each seminar and an evaluation group evaluates each seminar and presenter. Correlation seminars help students revise the organ system covered and understand its clinical importance, promote teamwork and organization, and supports active learning. Correlation seminars should be considered as a learning modality by other medical schools.

Citations

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    Brenda J. Klement, Douglas F. Paulsen, Lawrence E. Wineski
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2016; 3: JMECD.S18919.     CrossRef
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions