Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
2 "Cooperative behavior"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Research Articles
External and internal factors influencing self-directed online learning of physiotherapy undergraduate students in Sweden: a qualitative study  
Catharina Sj?dahl Hammarlund, Maria H. Nilsson, Christina Gummesson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:33.   Published online June 22, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.33
  • 34,609 View
  • 283 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Online courses have become common in health sciences education. This learning environment can be designed using different approaches to support student learning. To further develop online environment, it is important to understand how students perceive working and learning online. The aim of this study is to identify aspects influencing students’ learning processes and their adaptation to self-directed learning online. Methods: Thirty-four physiotherapy students with a mean age of 25 years (range, 21 to 34 years) participated. Qualitative content analysis and triangulation was used when investigating the students’ self-reflections, written during a five week self-directed, problem-oriented online course. Results: Two categories emerged: ‘the influence of the structured framework’ and ‘communication and interaction with teachers and peers.’ The learning processes were influenced by external factors, e.g., a clear structure including a transparent alignment of assignments and assessment. Important challenges to over-come were primarily internal factors, e.g., low self-efficacy, difficulties to plan the work effectively and adapting to a new environment. Conclusion: The analyses reflected important perspectives targeting areas which enable further course development. The influences of external and internal factors on learning strategies and self-efficacy are important aspects to consider when designing online courses. Factors such as pedagogical design, clarity of purpose, goals, and guidelines were important as well as continuous opportunities for communication and collaboration. Further studies are needed to understand and scaffold the motivational factors among students with low self-efficacy.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Perception and attitude towards online clinical modules: a cross-sectional study among medical students from two countries
    Heraa Islam, Mohsin Nazeer Muhammed, Sindhura Lakshmi, Aditi Kapoor, Afraz Jahan, Akhila Doddamani, Nagaraja Kamath, Muhammed Ehsan, Suma Nair
    F1000Research.2024; 12: 776.     CrossRef
  • Doctor of philosophy students’ academic success and the role of personal values
    Richard Jaffu
    Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Have we failed them? Online learning self‐efficacy of physiotherapy students during COVID‐19 pandemic
    Mohammad Madi, Hayat Hamzeh, Sumayeh Abujaber, Zakariya H. Nawasreh
    Physiotherapy Research International.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception and attitude towards online clinical modules: a cross-sectional study among medical students from two countries
    Heraa Islam, Mohsin Nazeer Muhammed, Sindhura Lakshmi, Aditi Kapoor, Afraz Jahan, Akhila Doddamani, Nagaraja Kamath, Muhammed Ehsan, Suma Nair
    F1000Research.2023; 12: 776.     CrossRef
  • ‘Learning in and out of lockdown’: A comparison of two groups of undergraduate occupational therapy students' engagement in online‐only and blended education approaches during the COVID‐19 pandemic
    Ted Brown, Luke Robinson, Kate Gledhill, Mong‐Lin Yu, Stephen Isbel, Craig Greber, Dave Parsons, Jamie Etherington
    Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.2022; 69(3): 301.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of the factors affecting the e-learning process in occupational therapy education during the pandemic with principal component analysis
    Başar Öztürk, Remziye Akarsu, Hülya Kayıhan, Yusuf Çelik, Saynur Elif Kayhan
    British Journal of Occupational Therapy.2022; 85(9): 694.     CrossRef
  • Les liens entre les objectifs de formation, les facteurs sociodemographiques et la reussite chez des participants a un MOOC professionnalisant
    Théodore Njingang Mbadjoin, Rawad Chaker
    McGill Journal of Education.2022; 56(1): 149.     CrossRef
  • Perception of online learning among health sciences' students– A mixed methods study
    Komal Maheshwari, Nidhi Ladha, Meenakshi Khapre, Rupinder Deol
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2022; 11(1): 286.     CrossRef
  • THE APPLICABILITY OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN HEALTHCARE TECHNICIAN EDUCATION: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY
    Hakan TEKEDERE, Hanife GÖKER
    İnönü Üniversitesi Sağlık Hizmetleri Meslek Yüksek Okulu Dergisi.2022; 10(2): 488.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the structural relationships between course design factors, learner commitment, self-directed learning, and intentions for further learning in a self-paced MOOC
    Dongho Kim, Eulho Jung, Meehyun Yoon, Yunjeong Chang, Sanghoon Park, Dongsim Kim, Fatih Demir
    Computers & Education.2021; 166: 104171.     CrossRef
  • Undergraduate medical education amid COVID-19: a qualitative analysis of enablers and barriers to acquiring competencies in distant learning using focus groups
    Anika Reinhart, Bastian Malzkorn, Carsten Döing, Ines Beyer, Jana Jünger, Hans Martin Bosse
    Medical Education Online.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Readiness towards online learning among physiotherapy undergraduates
    Harikrishnan Ranganathan, Devinder Kaur Ajit Singh, Saravana Kumar, Shobha Sharma, Siew Kuan Chua, Nabilah Binti Ahmad, Kamalambal Harikrishnan
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • E- Learning experience of the medical profession’s college students during COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia
    Eidan M. Al Zahrani, Yaser A. Al Naam, Saad M. AlRabeeah, Deemah N. Aldossary, Lamiaa H. Al-Jamea, Alexander Woodman, Mohammad Shawaheen, Osama Altiti, Jenifer V. Quiambao, Zechariah J. Arulanantham, Salah H. Elsafi
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Enseñanza online en Fisioterapia ¿Es posible? Reflexiones en torno a la situación actual.
    Roy La Touche
    NeuroRehabNews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A systematic review of the factors – enablers and barriers – affecting e-learning in health sciences education
    Krishna Regmi, Linda Jones
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Digital technologies in undergraduate and postgraduate education in occupational therapy and physiotherapy: a scoping review
    Benita Olivier, Michele Verdonck, Daleen Caseleijn
    JBI Evidence Synthesis.2020; 18(5): 863.     CrossRef
  • Exploring Open Space: A self-directed learning approach for higher education
    Tamara Van Woezik, Rob Reuzel, Jur Koksma, Sandro Serpa
    Cogent Education.2019; 6(1): 1615766.     CrossRef
Promoting collaboration and cultural competence for physician assistant and physical therapist students: a cross-cultural decentralized interprofessional education model  
Kathleen De Oliveira, Sara North, Barbra Beck, Jane Hopp
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:20.   Published online May 27, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.20
  • 34,056 View
  • 212 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
As the United States health care model progresses towards medical teams and the country’s population continues to diversify, the need for health professional education programs to develop and implement culturally specific interprofessional education (IPE) becomes increasingly imperative. A wide range of models exists for delivering and implementing IPE in health education, but none have included the cultural components that are vital in educating the health professional. Methods: A cross-cultural decentralized IPE model for physician assistant (PA) and physical therapy (PT) students was developed. This three-part IPE series was created using an established cultural curricular model and began with the exploration of self, continued with the examination of various dimensions of culture, and concluded with the exploration of the intersection between health and culture. We assessed student satisfaction of the IPE experiences and students’ engagement and attitudes towards IPE using a three-item open-ended questionnaire administered after each cross-cultural activity and the Interprofessional Education Series Survey (IESS) upon the completion of the series. Results: IESS responses showed that PA and PT students reported benefits in interprofessional collaboration and cultural awareness and expressed overall satisfaction with the series. Qualitative analysis revealed growth in student response depth consistent with the scaffolded focus of each IPE module in the series. Conclusion: The trends in this three-part series suggest that institutions looking to develop culturally inclusive IPE educational initiatives may have success through a decentralized model mirroring the effective cultural progression focused on addressing exploration of self, examination of various dimensions of culture, and exploration of the intersection between health and culture.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Global Health Assessment for Education in Healthcare Professions
    Connor Sharon E., Jonkman Lauren J., Covvey Jordan R., Kahaleh Abby A., Park Sharon K., Ryan Melody, Klein-Fedyshin Michele, Golchin Negar, Veillard Regine Beliard
    Annals of Global Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education workshop on aging: student perceptions of interprofessional collaboration, aging, and cultural fluency
    Carey A. Winkler, Jill A. Campbell, Kelli A. Nielsen, Renee M. Broughten, Ambria C. Crusan, Stacy M. Husebo
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2021; 35(sup1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Using a Low-Fidelity Simulation to Enhance Cultural Awareness and Emotional Intelligence in Nursing Students
    Adriana D. Glenn, Faith Claman
    Nursing Education Perspectives.2020; 41(1): 63.     CrossRef
  • A Systematic Meta‐Analysis of the Effect of Interprofessional Education on Health Professions Students’ Attitudes
    Zairan Wang, Fenglian Feng, Shang Gao, Jiping Yang
    Journal of Dental Education.2019; 83(12): 1361.     CrossRef
  • Incorporando a Competência Cultural para Atenção à Saúde Materna em População Quilombola na Educação das Profissões da Saúde
    Reginaldo Antônio de Oliveira Freitas Júnior, Carolina Araújo Damásio Santos, Lilian Lira Lisboa, Ana Karla Monteiro Santana de Oliveira Freitas, Vera Lúcia Garcia, George Dantas de Azevedo
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2018; 42(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes of Physician Assistant Educators Toward Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Care
    Laura A. Levy, Kathleen Mathieson
    Journal of Physician Assistant Education.2017; 28(2): 72.     CrossRef
  • Unmet needs in health training among nurses in rural Chinese township health centers: a cross-sectional hospital-based study
    Yan Mo, Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi, Yanping Ying, Huiqiao Huang, Zhongxian Huang, Jiafeng Lin
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 22.     CrossRef
  • Will the year 2016 augur well for better patient safety and health of residents in Korea according to the enactment of the Act for improving the resident training environment and enhancing resident’s status?
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 2.     CrossRef
  • Direct Engagement With Communities and Interprofessional Learning to Factor Culture Into End-of-Life Health Care Delivery
    Nathan A. Boucher
    American Journal of Public Health.2016; 106(6): 996.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions