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Research article
Equal Z standard-setting method to estimate the minimum number of panelists for a medical school’s objective structured clinical examination in Taiwan: a simulation study  
Ying-Ying Yang, Pin-Hsiang Huang, Ling-Yu Yang, Chia-Chang Huang, Chih-Wei Liu, Shiau-Shian Huang, Chen-Huan Chen, Fa-Yauh Lee, Shou-Yen Kao, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:27.   Published online October 17, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.27
  • 1,918 View
  • 122 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Undertaking a standard-setting exercise is a common method for setting pass/fail cut scores for high-stakes examinations. The recently introduced equal Z standard-setting method (EZ method) has been found to be a valid and effective alternative for the commonly used Angoff and Hofstee methods and their variants. The current study aims to estimate the minimum number of panelists required for obtaining acceptable and reliable cut scores using the EZ method.
Methods
The primary data were extracted from 31 panelists who used the EZ method for setting cut scores for a 12-station of medical school’s final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in Taiwan. For this study, a new data set composed of 1,000 random samples of different panel sizes, ranging from 5 to 25 panelists, was established and analyzed. Analysis of variance was performed to measure the differences in the cut scores set by the sampled groups, across all sizes within each station.
Results
On average, a panel of 10 experts or more yielded cut scores with confidence more than or equal to 90% and 15 experts yielded cut scores with confidence more than or equal to 95%. No significant differences in cut scores associated with panel size were identified for panels of 5 or more experts.
Conclusion
The EZ method was found to be valid and feasible. Less than an hour was required for 12 panelists to assess 12 OSCE stations. Calculating the cut scores required only basic statistical skills.
Software report
Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:8.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.8
  • 8,091 View
  • 233 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine whether a computer simulation of practical exercises in undergraduate medical pharmacology led to the realization of the intended learning outcomes.
Methods
The study was a descriptive analysis of laboratory classes carried out using computer simulation programs. Five programs were used to teach practical pharmacology to undergraduate medical students at the Mulungushi University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The study period was January 2018 to December 2019. The computer programs included a pharmacokinetics simulator (CyberPatient), organ bath simulator (OBSim), AutonomiCAL for simulating autonomic pharmacology, and Virtual Cat and Virtual Rat (RatCVS) for simulating cardiovascular pharmacology. Students utilized these programs during their pharmacology laboratory classes, wrote reports, and answered relevant clinical questions.
Results
The 5 programs provided easy and precise platforms for students to explore concepts and demonstrate knowledge of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology, and their clinical applications.
Conclusion
The programs were effective learning tools. Students’ learning was easily assessed based on their laboratory reports. Although the computer programs met medical students’ learning needs, wet laboratory exercises are also needed to meet the needs of students who require practical laboratory skills.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Quality and impact of pharmacology digital simulation education on pre-registration healthcare students: A systematic literature review
    Sharad Rayamajhi, Alison Machin, Cathal Breen, Gdiom Gebreheat, Ruth Paterson
    Nurse Education Today.2024; 140: 106295.     CrossRef
  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
Research Article
Learning gain of pharmacy students after introducing guided inquiry learning with computer simulation in a pharmacology class in Fiji  
Christian C Ezeala, Arnold A Ram, Napolioni Vulakouvaki
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:9.   Published online December 23, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.9
  • 29,292 View
  • 156 Download
  • 12 Crossref
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A systematic review on the use of virtual patient and computer-based simulation for experiential pharmacy education
    Chamipa Phanudulkitti, Surangkana Puengrung, Rittnarong Meepong, Kathryn Vanderboll, Karen Bell Farris, Sarah E. Vordenberg
    Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy.2023; 11: 100316.     CrossRef
  • Simulation-Based Education Implementation in Pharmacy Curriculum: A Review of the Current Status
    Ghazwa B Korayem, Omar A Alshaya, Sawsan M Kurdi, Lina I Alnajjar, Aisha F Badr, Amjaad Alfahed, Ameera Cluntun
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2022; Volume 13: 649.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the educational technology use in undergraduate pharmacy teaching and learning – A systematic review
    Chooi Yeng Lee, Shaun Wen Huey Lee
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 159.     CrossRef
  • Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia
    Christian Chinyere Ezeala
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 8.     CrossRef
  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the effectiveness of an online dental pharmacology course
    Miguel A. Morales‐Pérez, Alba R. Muñoz‐Gómez, Gabriela Argumedo, José F. Gómez‐Clavel
    Journal of Dental Education.2020; 84(8): 902.     CrossRef
  • A Review of Research on Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning: Implications for Research and Practice
    Jon-Marc G. Rodriguez, Kevin H. Hunter, Leah J. Scharlott, Nicole M. Becker
    Journal of Chemical Education.2020; 97(10): 3506.     CrossRef
  • Pharmacists’ Knowledge and Practice of Issues Related to Using Psychotropic Medication in Elderly People in Ethiopia: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study
    Gashaw Binega Mekonnen, Alemante Tafese Beyna
    BioMed Research International.2020; 2020: 1.     CrossRef
  • Examining the effectiveness of guided inquiry with problem-solving process and cognitive function training in a high school chemistry course
    Niwat Tornee, Tassanee Bunterm, Kerry Lee, Supaporn Muchimapura
    Pedagogies: An International Journal.2019; 14(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Curriculum integration of virtual patients
    Karen Dahri, Kimberley MacNeil, Fong Chan, Emilie Lamoureux, Mattie Bakker, Katherine Seto, Janice Yeung
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2019; 11(12): 1309.     CrossRef
  • Palestinian pharmacists’ knowledge of issues related to using psychotropic medications in older people: a cross-sectional study
    Ramzi Shawahna, Mais Khaskiyyi, Hadeel Abdo, Yasmen Msarwe, Rania Odeh, Souad Salame
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 8.     CrossRef
  • Peritoneal Dialysis University for Surgeons: A Peritoneal Access Training Program
    John H. Crabtree, Todd Penner, Sean W. Armstrong, John Burkart
    Peritoneal Dialysis International: Journal of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.2016; 36(2): 177.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions