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Research article
No difference in factual or conceptual recall comprehension for tablet, laptop, and handwritten note-taking by medical students in the United States: a survey-based observational study  
Warren Wiechmann, Robert Edwards, Cheyenne Low, Alisa Wray, Megan Boysen-Osborn, Shannon Toohey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:8.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.8
  • 10,672 View
  • 466 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Technological advances are changing how students approach learning. The traditional note-taking methods of longhand writing have been supplemented and replaced by tablets, smartphones, and laptop note-taking. It has been theorized that writing notes by hand requires more complex cognitive processes and may lead to better retention. However, few studies have investigated the use of tablet-based note-taking, which allows the incorporation of typing, drawing, highlights, and media. We therefore sought to confirm the hypothesis that tablet-based note-taking would lead to equivalent or better recall as compared to written note-taking.
Methods
We allocated 68 students into longhand, laptop, or tablet note-taking groups, and they watched and took notes on a presentation on which they were assessed for factual and conceptual recall. A second short distractor video was shown, followed by a 30-minute assessment at the University of California, Irvine campus, over a single day period in August 2018. Notes were analyzed for content, supplemental drawings, and other media sources.
Results
No significant difference was found in the factual or conceptual recall scores for tablet, laptop, and handwritten note-taking (P=0.61). The median word count was 131.5 for tablets, 121.0 for handwriting, and 297.0 for laptops (P=0.01). The tablet group had the highest presence of drawing, highlighting, and other media/tools.
Conclusion
In light of conflicting research regarding the best note-taking method, our study showed that longhand note-taking is not superior to tablet or laptop note-taking. This suggests students should be encouraged to pick the note-taking method that appeals most to them. In the future, traditional note-taking may be replaced or supplemented with digital technologies that provide similar efficacy with more convenience.
Review Article
Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory  
Cesar Orsini, Vivian I. Binnie, Sarah L. Wilson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:19.   Published online May 2, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.19
  • 54,562 View
  • 801 Download
  • 94 Web of Science
  • 96 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students’ motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory’s perspective. Methods: A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases), hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they reported research in health professions education focused on determinants, mediators, and/or outcomes of motivation from the self-determination and if meeting the quality criteria. Results: A total of 17 studies met the inclusion and quality criteria. Articles retrieved came from diverse locations and mainly from medical education and to a lesser extent from psychology and dental education. Intrapersonal (gender and personality traits) and interpersonal determinants (academic conditions and lifestyle, qualitative method of selection, feedback, and an autonomy supportive learning climate) have been reported to have a positive influence on students’ motivation to engage in academic activities. No studies were found that tested mediation effects between determinants and students’ motivation. In turn, students’ self-determined motivation has been found to be positively associated with different cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: This study has found that generally, motivation could be enhanced by changes in the educational environment and by an early detection of students’ characteristics. Doing so may support future health practitioners’ self-determined motivation and positively influence how they process information and their emotions and how they approach their learning activities.

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Brief Report
How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?  
Greer Glazer, Laura F. Startsman, Karen Bankston, Julia Michaels, Jennifer C. Danek, Malika Fair
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:12.   Published online February 27, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.12
  • 41,210 View
  • 200 Download
  • 18 Web of Science
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

Citations

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  • Comparison of the Multiple Mini-Interview and the Traditional Interview in Medical School Admissions: Lessons Learned Using a Hybrid Model at One Institution
    Madeline Abrams, Doreen M. Olvet, Lisa Ellenbogen, Jeffrey B. Bird, Christopher Fazio, Lauren Caprioglio, Samara Ginzburg, Lawrence Smith, Rona Woldenberg
    Academic Medicine.2023; 98(5): 606.     CrossRef
  • Interviews for Graduate Admissions in Communication Sciences and Disorders: Methods From Two CSD Programs
    Christine M. Carmichael, Kerry Callahan Mandulak, Diana Watkins
    Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.2022; 7(2): 426.     CrossRef
  • Clinical psychology PhD students' admission experiences: Implications for recruiting racial/ethnic minority and LGBTQ students
    Loretta Hsueh, Alexandra Werntz, Steven Hobaica, Sarah A. Owens, Mark A. Lumley, Jason J. Washburn
    Journal of Clinical Psychology.2021; 77(1): 105.     CrossRef
  • Online interviews for the selection of applicants for admission into an entry to practice program in pharmacy: Relationship to performance and student perspectives
    Ken Cor, Ravina Snghera, Dion R. Brocks
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2021; 13(6): 616.     CrossRef
  • Multiple Mini-Interview Utilization in United States Physician Assistant Program Admission Processes
    Kassidy James, Ziemowit Mazur, Michel Statler, Theresa Hegmann, Grace Landel, Venetia L. Orcutt
    Journal of Physician Assistant Education.2021; 32(2): 74.     CrossRef
  • Versatility in multiple mini-interview implementation: Rater background does not significantly influence assessment scoring
    Keith D. Baker, Roy T. Sabo, Meagan Rawls, Moshe Feldman, Sally A. Santen
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Rethinking the Admissions Interview: Piloting Multiple Mini-Interviews in a Graduate Psychology Program
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  • Interviewer perceptions during the implementation of the multiple mini-interview model at a school of pharmacy
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    Monica Williamson Nenad
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Research Article
Developing a situational judgment test blueprint for assessing the non-cognitive skills of applicants to the University of Utah School of Medicine, the United States  
Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Karly Pippitt, Benjamin Chan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:51.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.51
  • 31,285 View
  • 218 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The situational judgment test (SJT) shows promise for assessing the non-cognitive skills of medical school applicants, but has only been used in Europe. Since the admissions processes and education levels of applicants to medical school are different in the United States and in Europe, it is necessary to obtain validity evidence of the SJT based on a sample of United States applicants. Methods: Ninety SJT items were developed and Kane’s validity framework was used to create a test blueprint. A total of 489 applicants selected for assessment/interview day at the University of Utah School of Medicine during the 2014-2015 admissions cycle completed one of five SJTs, which assessed professionalism, coping with pressure, communication, patient focus, and teamwork. Item difficulty, each item’s discrimination index, internal consistency, and the categorization of items by two experts were used to create the test blueprint. Results: The majority of item scores were within an acceptable range of difficulty, as measured by the difficulty index (0.50-0.85) and had fair to good discrimination. However, internal consistency was low for each domain, and 63% of items appeared to assess multiple domains. The concordance of categorization between the two educational experts ranged from 24% to 76% across the five domains. Conclusion: The results of this study will help medical school admissions departments determine how to begin constructing a SJT. Further testing with a more representative sample is needed to determine if the SJT is a useful assessment tool for measuring the non-cognitive skills of medical school applicants.

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  • New Advances in Physician Assistant Admissions: The History of Situational Judgement Tests and the Development of CASPer
    Shalon R. Buchs, M. Jane McDaniel
    Journal of Physician Assistant Education.2021; 32(2): 87.     CrossRef
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    Gurvinder S. Sahota, Jaspal S. Taggar
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    Adanna Chukwuma, Uche Obi, Ifunanya Agu, Chinyere Mbachu
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2020; 7: 238212052097823.     CrossRef
  • Situational judgment test validity: an exploratory model of the participant response process using cognitive and think-aloud interviews
    Michael D. Wolcott, Nikki G. Lobczowski, Jacqueline M. Zeeman, Jacqueline E. McLaughlin
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    Koren Hazut, Pnina Romem, Smadar Malkin, Ilana Livshiz‐Riven
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Technical Report
An assessment blueprint for the Advanced Medical Life Support two-day prehospital emergency medical services training program in the United States  
Les R. Becker, Matt Vassar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:43.   Published online August 7, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.43
  • 32,977 View
  • 191 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Traditional approaches to blueprint creation may focus on fine-grained detail at the expense of important foundational concepts. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for constructing an assessment blueprint to guide the creation of a new post-test for a two-day prehospital emergency medical services training program. Methods: In order to create the blueprint, we first determined the proportions of the total classroom and home-study minutes associated with the lower- and higher-order cognitive objectives of each chapter of the textbook and the two-day classroom activities during training courses conducted from January to April 2015. These proportions were then applied to a 50-question test structure in order to calculate the number of desired questions by chapter and content type. Results: Our blueprint called for the test to contain an almost even split of lower- and higher-order cognitive questions. One-best-answer multiple choice items and extended matching-type items were written to assess lower- and higher-order cognitive content, respectively. Conclusion: We report the first known application of an assessment blueprint to a prehospital professional development education program. Our approach to blueprint creation is computationally straightforward and could be easily adopted by a group of instructors with a basic understanding of lower- and higher-order cognitive constructs. By blueprinting at the chapter level, as we have done, item-writers should be more inclined to construct questions that focus on important central themes or procedures.

Citations

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  • Evaluation of Emergency First Response’s Competency in Undergraduate College Students: Enhancing Sustainable Medical Education in the Community for Work Occupational Safety
    Graciano Dieck-Assad, Omar Israel González Peña, José Manuel Rodríguez-Delgado
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(15): 7814.     CrossRef
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    Ghada Eweda, Zakeya Abdulbaqi Bukhary, Omayma Hamed
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Research Article
Prefrontal hemodynamic responses and the degree of flow experience among occupational therapy students during their performance of a cognitive task  
Kazuki Hirao
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:24.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.24
  • 27,564 View
  • 186 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Although flow experience is positively associated with motivation to learn, the biological basis of flow experience is poorly understood. Accumulation of evidence on the underlying brain mechanisms related to flow is necessary for a deeper understanding of the motivation to learn. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between flow experience and brain function using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during the performance of a cognitive task. Methods: Sixty right-handed occupational therapy (OT) students participated in this study. These students performed a verbal fluency test (VFT) while 2-channel NIRS was used to assess changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxygenated hemoglobin [oxy-Hb]) in the prefrontal cortex. Soon after that, the OT students answered the flow questionnaire (FQ) to assess the degree of flow experience during the VFT. Results: Average oxy-Hb in the prefrontal cortex had a significant negative correlation with the satisfaction scores on the FQ. Conclusion: Satisfaction during the flow experience correlated with prefrontal hemodynamic suppression. This finding may assist in understanding motivation to learn and related flow experience.

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    Hiroyuki Uchida, Kazuki Hirao
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions