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Research articles
Implementation strategy for introducing a clinical skills examination to the Korean Oriental Medicine Licensing Examination: a mixed-method modified Delphi study  
Chan-Young Kwon, Sanghoon Lee, Min Hwangbo, Chungsik Cho, Sangwoo Shin, Dong-Hyeon Kim, Aram Jeong, Hye-Yoon Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:23.   Published online July 17, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.23
  • 1,758 View
  • 137 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated the validity of introducing a clinical skills examination (CSE) to the Korean Oriental Medicine Licensing Examination through a mixed-method modified Delphi study.
Methods
A 3-round Delphi study was conducted between September and November 2022. The expert panel comprised 21 oriental medicine education experts who were officially recommended by relevant institutions and organizations. The questionnaires included potential content for the CSE and a detailed implementation strategy. Subcommittees were formed to discuss concerns around the introduction of the CSE, which were collected as open-ended questions. In this study, a 66.7% or greater agreement rate was defined as achieving a consensus.
Results
The expert panel’s evaluation of the proposed clinical presentations and basic clinical skills suggested their priorities. Of the 10 items investigated for building a detailed implementation strategy for the introduction of the CSE to the Korean Oriental Medicine Licensing Examination, a consensus was achieved on 9. However, the agreement rate on the timing of the introduction of the CSE was low. Concerns around 4 clinical topics were discussed in the subcommittees, and potential solutions were proposed.
Conclusion
This study offers preliminary data and raises some concerns that can be used as a reference while discussing the introduction of the CSE to the Korean Oriental Medicine Licensing Examination.
Enhancement of the technical and non-technical skills of nurse anesthesia students using the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool in Iran: a quasi-experimental study  
Ali Khalafi, Maedeh Kordnejad, Vahid Saidkhani
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:19.   Published online June 16, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.19
  • 1,267 View
  • 82 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated the effect of evaluations based on the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool (ALMAT) form on improving the technical and non-technical skills of final-year nurse anesthesia students at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS).
Methods
This was a semi-experimental study with a pre-test and post-test design. It included 45 final-year nurse anesthesia students of AJUMS and lasted for 3 months. The technical and non-technical skills of the intervention group were assessed at 4 university hospitals using formative-feedback evaluation based on the ALMAT form, from induction of anesthesia until reaching mastery and independence. Finally, the students’ degree of improvement in technical and non-technical skills was compared between the intervention and control groups. Statistical tests (the independent t-test, paired t-test, and Mann-Whitney test) were used to analyze the data.
Results
The rate of improvement in post-test scores of technical skills was significantly higher in the intervention group than in the control group (P˂0.0001). Similarly, the students in the intervention group received significantly higher post-test scores for non-technical skills than the students in the control group (P˂0.0001).
Conclusion
The findings of this study showed that the use of ALMAT as a formative-feedback evaluation method to evaluate technical and non-technical skills had a significant effect on improving these skills and was effective in helping students learn and reach mastery and independence.
Improvement of the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students using mini-clinical evaluation exercises in Iran: a randomized controlled study  
Ali Khalafi, Yasamin Sharbatdar, Nasrin Khajeali, Mohammad Hosein Haghighizadeh, Mahshid Vaziri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:12.   Published online April 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.12
  • 2,335 View
  • 117 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessment on improving the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran.
Methods
This study started on November 1, 2022, and ended on December 1, 2022. It was conducted among 50 nurse anesthesia students divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention group’s clinical skills were evaluated 4 times using the mini-CEX method. In contrast, the same skills were evaluated in the control group based on the conventional method—that is, general supervision by the instructor during the internship and a summative evaluation based on a checklist at the end of the course. The intervention group students also filled out a questionnaire to measure their satisfaction with the mini-CEX method.
Results
The mean score of the students in both the control and intervention groups increased significantly on the post-test (P<0.0001), but the improvement in the scores of the intervention group was significantly greater compared with the control group (P<0.0001). The overall mean score for satisfaction in the intervention group was 76.3 out of a maximum of 95.
Conclusion
The findings of this study showed that using mini-CEX as a formative evaluation method to evaluate clinical skills had a significant effect on the improvement of nurse anesthesia students’ clinical skills, and they had a very favorable opinion about this evaluation method.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Psychometric testing of anesthesia nursing competence scale (AnestComp)
    Samira Mahmoudi, Akram Yazdani, Fatemeh Hasanshiri
    Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management.2024; 34: 100368.     CrossRef
  • Application of flipped classroom teaching method based on ADDIE concept in clinical teaching for neurology residents
    Juan Zhang, Hong Chen, Xie Wang, Xiaofeng Huang, Daojun Xie
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparing Satisfaction of Undergraduate Nursing Students`: Mini-CEX vs CIM in Assessing Clinical Competence
    Somia Saghir, Anny Ashiq Ali, Kashif Khan, Uzma Bibi, Shafaat Ullah, Rafi Ullah, Zaifullah Khan, Tahir Khan
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2023; : 134.     CrossRef
  • Enhancement of the technical and non-technical skills of nurse anesthesia students using the Anesthetic List Management Assessment Tool in Iran: a quasi-experimental study
    Ali Khalafi, Maedeh Kordnejad, Vahid Saidkhani
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2023; 20: 19.     CrossRef
Effect of a smartphone-based online electronic logbook to evaluate the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students in Iran: a randomized controlled study  
Ali Khalafi, Nahid Jamshidi, Nasrin Khajeali, Saeed Ghanbari
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:10.   Published online March 31, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.10
  • 1,864 View
  • 106 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was conducted to evaluate a smartphone-based online electronic logbook used to assess the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students in Iran.
Methods
This randomized controlled study was conducted after tool development at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences in Ahvaz, Iran from January 2022 to December 2022. The online electronic logbook involved in this study was an Android-compatible application used to evaluate the clinical skills of nurse anesthesia students. In the implementation phase, the online electronic logbook was piloted for 3 months in anesthesia training in comparison with a paper logbook. For this purpose, 49 second- and third-year anesthesia nursing students selected using the census method were assigned to intervention (online electronic logbook) and control (paper logbook) groups. The online electronic logbook and paper logbook were compared in terms of student satisfaction and learning outcomes.
Results
A total of 39 students participated in the study. The mean satisfaction score of the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P=0.027). The mean score of learning outcomes was also significantly higher for the intervention than the control group (P=0.028).
Conclusion
Smartphone technology can provide a platform for improving the evaluation of the clinical skills of nursing anesthesia students, leading to increased satisfaction and improved learning outcomes.
Physical therapy students’ perception of their ability of clinical and clinical decision-making skills enhanced after simulation-based learning courses in the United States: a repeated measures design  
Fabian Bizama, Mansoor Alameri, Kristy Jean Demers, Derrick Ferguson Campbell
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:34.   Published online December 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.34
  • 2,605 View
  • 189 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aimed to investigate physical therapy students’ perception of their ability of clinical and clinical decision-making skills after a simulation-based learning course in the United States.
Methods
Survey questionnaires were administered to voluntary participants, including 44 second and third-year physical therapy students of the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences during 2021–2022. Thirty-six questionnaire items consisted of 4 demographic items, 1 general evaluation, 21 test items for clinical decision-making skills, and 4 clinical skill items. Descriptive and inferential statistics evaluated differences in students’ perception of their ability in clinical decision-making and clinical skills, pre- and post-simulation, and post-first clinical experience during 2021–2022.
Results
Friedman test revealed a significant increase from pre- to post-simulation in perception of the ability of clinical and clinical decision-making skills total tool score (P<0.001), clinical decision-making 21-item score (P<0.001), and clinical skills score (P<0.001). No significant differences were found between post-simulation and post-first clinical experience. Post-hoc tests indicated a significant difference between pre-simulation and post-simulation (P<0.001) and between pre-simulation and post-first clinical experience (P<0.001). Forty-three students (97.6%) either strongly agreed (59.1%) or agreed (38.5%) that simulation was a valuable learning experience.
Conclusion
The above findings suggest that simulation-based learning helped students begin their first clinical experience with enhanced clinical and clinical decision-making skills.

Citations

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  • Physiotherapists' training in oncology rehabilitation from entry‐level to advanced education: A qualitative study
    Gianluca Bertoni, Valentina Conti, Marco Testa, Ilaria Coppola, Stefania Costi, Simone Battista
    Physiotherapy Research International.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Simulación clínica mediada por tecnología: un escenario didáctico a partir de recursos para la formación de los profesionales en rehabilitación
    Cyndi Yacira Meneses Castaño, Isabel Jimenez Becerra, Paola Teresa Penagos Gomez
    Educación Médica.2023; 24(4): 100810.     CrossRef
  • Self-Efficacy with Telehealth Examination: the Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Perspective
    Derrick F. Campbell, Jean-Michel Brismee, Brad Allen, Troy Hooper, Manuel A. Domenech, Kathleen J. Manella
    Philippine Journal of Physical Therapy.2023; 2(2): 12.     CrossRef
Effect of a forensic nursing virtual education course on knowledge and clinical decision-making of master’s nursing students in Iran: a non-equivalent control group pre- and post-test study
Zeynab Firuzi, Mitra Sedghi Sabet, Fateme Jafaraghaee, Hedayat Jafari, Ehsan Kazemnezhad Leyli, Samad Karkhah, Mohammad Javad Ghazanfari
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:20.   Published online August 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.20
  • 2,357 View
  • 256 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Forensic nursing is a specialty in the nursing profession based on legal procedures. This study aimed to assess the effect of a forensic nursing virtual education course on knowledge and clinical decision-making among master’s nursing students.
Methods
In a quasi-experimental study with a pre- and post-test, 106 master’s nursing students at Guilan (n=65) and Mazandaran (n=41) Universities of Medical Sciences, Iran were enrolled. Data were collected using census sampling from March to April 2021. Participants in the intervention group received a forensic nursing virtual education course in three 90-minute sessions for 2 days.
Results
A total of 88 out of 106 master’s nursing students were enrolled in this study. The mean post-education score for knowledge in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (12.52 vs. 7.67, P<0.001). The mean post-education score for clinical decision-making in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (16.96 vs. 13.64, P<0.001).
Conclusion
The level of knowledge and clinical decision-making of master’s nursing students regarding forensic evidence improved after the forensic nursing virtual education course in the intervention group compared to the control group. Nursing managers and policymakers can develop appropriate strategies to improve the knowledge and clinical decision-making of nursing students by using forensic nursing education courses in the curricula of nursing programs, especially in postgraduate education as an elective or mandatory course.
Comparison between residents with a 6-year medical program and a 7-year medical program in terms of objective structured clinical examination performance in postgraduate year training in Taiwan: a 2-group pre- and post-test non-synchronized study  
Ya-Ting Chang, Ying-Ying Yang, Chung-Pin Li, Chen-Huan Chen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:13.   Published online June 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.13
  • 2,357 View
  • 205 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In 2013, medical schools in Taiwan implemented a 6-year medical program that replaced the previous 7-year medical education program. The postgraduate year (PGY) program was also extended from 1 year to 2 years. The new program is characterized by diversified teaching, integration of medical skills, a system-oriented curriculum, and the implementation of primary care and clinical thinking training. The purpose of this study was to examine whether postgraduate residents who learned under the new program have better patient care skills than those who learned under the previous program.
Methods
Of 101 residents in the PGY program at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 78 were trained in the 6-year program, while 23 were trained in the 7-year program. During the PGY training, 2 objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) were used to evaluate clinical reasoning, communication skills, and procedural skills at the beginning of the training and after 11 months of training, respectively. The scores of each OSCE and the rate of improvement of the pre- and post-tests were analyzed.
Results
Residents trained in the new program scored higher on clinical reasoning (P<0.001) and the total scores of the 3 tested skills (P=0.019) on the pre-test. In terms of improvement, residents educated in the previous system improved more in clinical reasoning than those educated in the new education system.
Conclusion
The new medical education program, which emphasizes clinical thinking, improved residents’ clinical skills. The PGY program was effective in improving the clinical performance of residents who were educated in the previous system.
Brief Report
Clinical performance of medical students in Korea in a whole-task emergency station in the objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient complaining of palpitations  
Song Yi Park, Hyun-Hee Kong, Min-Jeong Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Sang-Hwa Lee, Sunju Im, Ji-Hyun Seo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:42.   Published online December 16, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.42
  • 4,807 View
  • 132 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study assessed the clinical performance of 150 third-year medicalstudents in Busan, Korea in a whole-task emergency objective structured clinical examination station that simulated a patient with palpitations visiting the emergency department. The examination was conducted from November 25 to 27, 2019. Clinical performance was assessed as the number and percentage of students who performed history-taking (HT), a physical examination (PE), an electrocardiography (ECG) study, patient education (Ed), and clinical reasoning (CR), which were items on the checklist. It was found that 18.0% of students checked the patient’s pulse, 51.3% completed an ECG study, and 57.9% explained the results to the patient. A sizable proportion (38.0%) of students did not even attempt an ECG study. In a whole-task emergency station, students showed good performance on HT and CR, but unsatisfactory results for PE, ECG study, and Ed. Clinical skills educational programs for subjected student should focus more on PE, timely diagnostic tests, and sufficient Ed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
Research articles
Increased competency of registered dietitian nutritionists in physical examination skills after simulation-based education in the United States  
Elizabeth MacQuillan, Jennifer Ford, Kristin Baird
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:40.   Published online December 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.40
  • 4,714 View
  • 145 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to translate simulation-based dietitian nutritionist education to clinical competency attainment in a group of practicing registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs). Using a standardized instrument to measure performance on a newly-required clinical skill, the nutrition-focused physical exam (NFPE), competence was measured both before and after a simulation-based education (SBE) session.
Methods
Eighteen practicing RDNs were recruited by their employer, Spectrum Health. Following a pre-briefing session, participants completed an initial 10-minute encounter, performing NFPE on a standardized patient (SP). Next, participants completed a 90-minute SBE training session on skills within the NFPE, including hands-on practice and role play, followed by a post-training SP encounter. Video recordings of the SP encounters were scored to assess competence in 7 skill areas within the NFPE. Scores were analyzed for participants’ initial competence and change in competence.
Results
The proportions of participants with initial competence ranged from 0% to 44% across the 7 skill areas assessed. The only competency where participants initially scored in the “meets expectations” range was “approach to the patient.” When raw competence scores were assessed for changes from pre- to post-SBE training, the paired t-test indicated significant increases in all 7 competency areas following the simulation-based training (P<0.001).
Conclusion
This study showed the effectiveness of a SBE training program for increasing competence scores of practicing RDNs on a defined clinical skill.

Citations

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  • Barriers for Liver Transplant in Patients with Alcohol-Related Hepatitis
    Gina Choi, Jihane N. Benhammou, Jung J. Yum, Elena G. Saab, Ankur P. Patel, Andrew J. Baird, Stephanie Aguirre, Douglas G. Farmer, Sammy Saab
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology.2022; 12(1): 13.     CrossRef
Peer-assisted feedback: a successful approach for providing feedback on United States Medical Licensing Exam-style clinical skills exam notes in the United States  
Kira Nagoshi, Zareen Zaidi, Ashleigh Wright, Carolyn Stalvey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:29.   Published online October 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.29
  • 9,972 View
  • 133 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Peer-assisted learning (PAL) promotes the development of communication, facilitates improvements in clinical skills, and is a way to provide feedback to learners. We utilized PAL as a conceptual framework to explore the feasibility of peer-assisted feedback (PAF) to improve note-writing skills without requiring faculty time. The aim was to assess whether PAL was a successful method to provide feedback on the United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE)-style clinical skills exam notes by using student feedback on a survey in the United States.
Methods
The University of Florida College of Medicine administers clinical skills examination (CSEs) that include USMLE-like note-writing. PAL, in which students support the learning of their peers, was utilized as an alternative to faculty feedback. Second-year (MS2) and third-year (MS3) medical students taking CSEs participated in faculty-run note-grading sessions immediately after testing, which included explanations of grading rubrics and the feedback process. Students graded an anonymized peer’s notes. The graded material was then forwarded anonymously to its student author to review. Students were surveyed on their perceived ability to provide feedback and the benefits derived from PAF using a Likert scale (1–6) and open-ended comments during the 2017–2018 academic year.
Results
Students felt generally positively about the activity, with mean scores for items related to educational value of 4.49 for MS2s and 5.11 for MS3s (out of 6). MS3s perceived peer feedback as constructive, felt that evaluating each other’s notes was beneficial, and felt that the exercise would improve their future notes. While still positive, MS2 students gave lower scores than the MS3 students.
Conclusion
PAF was a successful method of providing feedback on student CSE notes, especially for MS3s. MS2s commented that although they learned during the process, they might be more invested in improving their note-writing as they approach their own USMLE exam.

Citations

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  • How Do Learners Receive Feedback on Note Writing? A Scoping Review
    Allison Hansen, Ryan M. Klute, Manajyoti Yadav, Saurabh Bansal, William F. Bond
    Academic Medicine.2024; 99(6): 683.     CrossRef
  • Teaching feedback skills to veterinary students by peer-assisted learning
    Aytaç ÜNSAL ADACA
    Ankara Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi.2023; 70(3): 237.     CrossRef
  • Pedagogic Exploration Into Adapting Automated Writing Evaluation and Peer Review Integrated Feedback Into Large-Sized University Writing Classes
    Wei-Yan Li, Kevin Kau, Yi-Jiun Shiung
    SAGE Open.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Benefits of semiology taught using near-peer tutoring are sustainable
    Benjamin Gripay, Thomas André, Marie De Laval, Brice Peneau, Alexandre Secourgeon, Nicolas Lerolle, Cédric Annweiler, Grégoire Justeau, Laurent Connan, Ludovic Martin, Loïc Bière
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia  
Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:3.   Published online January 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.3
  • 20,877 View
  • 412 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Optimal methods for communication skills training (CST) are an active research area, but the effects of CST on communication performance in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) has not been closely studied. Student roleplay (RP) for CST is common, although volunteer simulated patient (SP) CST is cost-effective and provides authentic interactions. We assessed whether our volunteer SP CST program improved OSCE performance compared to our previous RP strategy.
Methods
We performed a retrospective, quasi-experimental study of 2 second-year medical student cohorts’ OSCE data in Australia. The 2014 cohort received RP-only CST (N=182) while the 2016 cohort received SP-only CST (N=148). The t-test and analysis of variance were used to compare the total scores in 3 assessment domains: generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Results
The baseline characteristics of groups (scores on the Australian Tertiary Admission Rank, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test, and medicine program interviews) showed no significant differences between groups. For each domain, the SP-only CST group demonstrated superior OSCE outcomes, and the difference between cohorts was significant (P<0.01). The superiority of volunteer SP CST over student RP CST in terms of OSCE performance outcomes was found for generic communication, clinical communication, and physical examination/procedural skills.
Conclusion
The better performance of the SP cohort in physical examination/procedural skills might be explained by the requirement for patient compliance and cooperation, facilitated by good generic communication skills. We recommend a volunteer SP program as an effective and efficient way to improve CST among junior medical students.

Citations

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  • Perceived authenticity across three forms of educational simulations—the role of interactant representation, task alignment, and continuity of simulation
    Caroline Corves, Matthias Stadler, Martin R. Fischer
    European Journal of Psychology of Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A cost analysis of a 5-day simulation-based learning program for speech-language pathology student training
    Elizabeth C. Ward, Emma Caird, Saval Khanal, Sanjeewa Kularatna, Joshua Byrnes, Adriana Penman, Sue Mcallister, Stacey Baldac, Elizabeth Cardell, Rachel Davenport, Bronwyn Davidson, Sally Hewat, Simone Howells, Patricia Mccabe, Alison Purcell, Joanne Walt
    International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.2023; 25(5): 688.     CrossRef
  • Perception of simulation-based first-aid training by medical students: a qualitative descriptive study
    Lukáš Plch, Daniel Barvík, Tereza Prokopová, Aneta Pilátová, Tereza Vafková, Jiří Zounek
    SN Social Sciences.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Marie Amitani, Haruka Amitani, Hajime Suzuki, Suguru Kawazu, Kimiko Mizuma, Kojiro Yamaguchi, Toshimichi Oki, Hideaki Nitta, Takuro Sonoda, Keiko Kawano, Yasuhiro Tanaka, Nanami Uto, Rie Ibusuki, Ryutaro Arita, Shin Takayama, Tadamichi Mitsuma, Toshiro Ta
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Stanislaw Gorski, Anna Prokop-Dorner, Michal Pers, Agata Stalmach-Przygoda, Łukasz Malecki, Grzegorz Cebula, Katrien Bombeke, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães Abreu
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  • Improved detection of patient centeredness in objective structured clinical examinations through authentic scenario design
    Kye-Yeung Park, Hoon-Ki Park, Hwan-Sik Hwang, Sang-Ho Yoo, Jae-Sook Ryu, Jong-Hoon Kim
    Patient Education and Counseling.2021; 104(5): 1094.     CrossRef
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    Conor Gilligan, Martine Powell, Marita C Lynagh, Bernadette M Ward, Chris Lonsdale, Pam Harvey, Erica L James, Dominique Rich, Sari P Dewi, Smriti Nepal, Hayley A Croft, Jonathan Silverman
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • Raising rare disease awareness using red flags, role play simulation and patient educators: results of a novel educational workshop on Raynaud phenomenon and systemic sclerosis
    S. Sanges, M.-M. Farhat, M. Assaraf, J. Galland, E. Rivière, C. Roubille, M. Lambert, C. Yelnik, H. Maillard, V. Sobanski, G. Lefèvre, D. Launay, S. Morell-Dubois, E. Hachulla
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improved clinical communication OSCE scores after simulation-based training: Results of a comparative study
    Alexandre Nuzzo, Alexy Tran-Dinh, Marie Courbebaisse, Hugo Peyre, Patrick Plaisance, Alexandre Matet, Brigitte Ranque, Albert Faye, Victoire de Lastours, Conor Gilligan
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238542.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of students' performance of objective structured clinical examination during clinical practice
    Jihye Yu, Sukyung Lee, Miran Kim, Janghoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2020; 32(3): 231.     CrossRef
Case report
Authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid gynecology station for the Papanicolaou test as part of a clinical skills examination in Korea  
Ji-Hyun Seo, Younglim Oh, Sunju Im, Do-Kyong Kim, Hyun-Hee Kong, HyeRin Roh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:4.   Published online February 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.4
  • 35,639 View
  • 316 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The objective of this study was to evaluate the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid station that combined a standardized patient encounter and a simulated Papanicolaou test.
Methods
We introduced a hybrid station in the routine clinical skills examination (CSE) for 335 third-year medical students at 4 universities in Korea from December 1 to December 3, 2014. After the tests, we conducted an anonymous survey on the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of the hybrid station.
Results
A total of 334 medical students and 17 professors completed the survey. A majority of the students (71.6%) and professors (82.4%) agreed that the hybrid station was more authentic than the standard CSE. Over 60 percent of the students and professors responded that the station was acceptable for assessing the students’ competence. Most of the students (75.2%) and professors (82.4%) assessed the required tasks as being feasible after reading the instructions.
Conclusion
Our results showed that the hybrid CSE station was a highly authentic, acceptable, and feasible way to assess medical students’ performance.

Citations

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  • From Research to Practice in OBGYN: How to Critically Interpret Studies in Implementation
    Rebecca F. Hamm, Michelle H. Moniz
    Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology.2022; 65(2): 277.     CrossRef
  • Clinical performance of medical students in Korea in a whole-task emergency station in the objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient complaining of palpitations
    Song Yi Park, Hyun-Hee Kong, Min-Jeong Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Sang-Hwa Lee, Sunju Im, Ji-Hyun Seo
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 42.     CrossRef
  • To the Point: The expanding role of simulation in obstetrics and gynecology medical student education
    Elise N. Everett, David A. Forstein, Susan Bliss, Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, LaTasha B. Craig, Scott C. Graziano, Brittany S. Hampton, Laura Hopkins, Margaret L. McKenzie, Helen Morgan, Archana Pradhan, Sarah M. Page-Ramsey
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2019; 220(2): 129.     CrossRef
Research article
Evaluation of a course to prepare international students for the United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 clinical skills exam  
Rachel B. Levine, Andrew P. Levy, Robert Lubin, Sarah Halevi, Rebeca Rios, Danelle Cayea
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:25.   Published online October 24, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.25
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
United States (US) and Canadian citizens attending medical school abroad often desire to return to the US for residency, and therefore must pass US licensing exams. We describe a 2-day United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 2 clinical skills (CS) preparation course for students in the Technion American Medical School program (Haifa, Israel) between 2012 and 2016.
Methods
Students completed pre- and post-course questionnaires. The paired t-test was used to measure students’ perceptions of knowledge, preparation, confidence, and competence in CS pre- and post-course. To test for differences by gender or country of birth, analysis of variance was used. We compared USMLE step 2 CS pass rates between the 5 years prior to the course and the 5 years during which the course was offered.
Results
Ninety students took the course between 2012 and 2016. Course evaluations began in 2013. Seventy-three students agreed to participate in the evaluation, and 64 completed the pre- and post-course surveys. Of the 64 students, 58% were US-born and 53% were male. Students reported statistically significant improvements in confidence and competence in all areas. No differences were found by gender or country of origin. The average pass rate for the 5 years prior to the course was 82%, and the average pass rate for the 5 years of the course was 89%.
Conclusion
A CS course delivered at an international medical school may help to close the gap between the pass rates of US and international medical graduates on a high-stakes licensing exam. More experience is needed to determine if this model is replicable.

Citations

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  • Cultural Considerations in the Formal Process of Simulation Curriculum Adaptation: A Scoping Review
    Matthew D. Charnetski, Maryam Asoodar, Hao Yu, Walther van Mook
    Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immigrant Neurologists in the United States
    Abhimanyu Mahajan, Zachary London, Andrew M. Southerland, Jaffar Khan, Erica A. Schuyler
    Neurology.2021; 96(8): 378.     CrossRef
  • Three Decades Later: A Scoping Review of the Literature Related to the United States Medical Licensing Examination
    Hanin Rashid, Kristen M. Coppola, Robert Lebeau
    Academic Medicine.2020; 95(11S): S114.     CrossRef
  • Improving Passage Rate on USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills: Results from a Pilot Program
    Michael S. Ryan, Melissa Bradner, Fidelma Rigby, Bennett Lee, Elizabeth Waterhouse, Catherine Grossman
    Medical Science Educator.2019; 29(3): 709.     CrossRef
Research Article
Is a decentralized continuing medical education program feasible for Chinese rural health professionals?  
Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:18.   Published online April 28, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.18
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  • 5 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Rural health professionals in township health centers (THCs) tend to have less advanced educational degrees. This study aimed to ascertain the perceived feasibility of a decentralized continuing medical education (CME) program to upgrade their educational levels. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of THC health professionals was conducted using a self-administered, structured questionnaire in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. Results: The health professionals in the THCs were overwhelmingly young with low education levels. They had a strong desire to upgrade their educational degrees. The decentralized CME program was perceived as feasible by health workers with positive attitudes about the benefit for license examination, and by those who intended to improve their clinical diagnosis and treatment skills. The target groups of such a program were those who expected to undertake a bachelor’s degree and who rated themselves as “partially capable” in clinical competency. They reported that 160-400 USD annually would be an affordable fee for the program. Conclusion: A decentralized CME program was perceived feasible to upgrade rural health workers’ education level to a bachelor’s degree and improve their clinical competency.

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  • Evaluation of the star family doctors training program: an observational cohort study of a novel continuing medical education program for general practitioners within a compact medical consortium: a quantitative analysis
    Ling-Bo Liang, Xu Li, Xiang-Ping Liu, Cai-Zheng Li, Dan Luo, Feng Liu, Ting-Rui Mao, Qiao-Li Su
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Needs and difficulties of Tibetan rural health care workers participating in professional training
    Ling Chen, Jie Liu, Zhihui Zheng, Sangphel Yeshi
    Australian Journal of Rural Health.2021; 29(4): 578.     CrossRef
  • Continuing medical education and work commitment among rural healthcare workers: a cross-sectional study in 11 western provinces in China
    Jinlin Liu, Ying Mao
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(8): e037985.     CrossRef
  • A Checklist for Implementing Rural Pathways to Train, Develop and Support Health Workers in Low and Middle-Income Countries
    Belinda O'Sullivan, Bruce Chater, Amie Bingham, John Wynn-Jones, Ian Couper, Nagwa Nashat Hegazy, Raman Kumar, Henry Lawson, Viviana Martinez-Bianchi, Sankha Randenikumara, James Rourke, Sarah Strasser, Paul Worley
    Frontiers in Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Unmet needs in health training among nurses in rural Chinese township health centers: a cross-sectional hospital-based study
    Yan Mo, Guijie Hu, Yanhua Yi, Yanping Ying, Huiqiao Huang, Zhongxian Huang, Jiafeng Lin
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 22.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University in Ethiopia  
Tadesse Melaku, Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula, Yonas Getaye, Sewunet Admasu, Ramadan Alkalmi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:9.   Published online February 15, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.9
  • 31,783 View
  • 213 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to compare the perceptions of pharmacy clerkship students and clinical preceptors of preceptors’ teaching behaviors at Gondar University. A cross-sectional study was conducted among pharmacy clerkship students and preceptors during June 2014 and December 2015. A 52-item structured questionnaire was self-administered to 126 students and 23 preceptors. The responses are presented using descriptive statistics. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test the significance of differences between students and preceptors. The response rate was 89.4% for students and 95.6% for preceptors. Statistically significant differences were observed in the responses regarding two of the five communication skills that were examined, six of the 26 clinical skills, and five of the 21 parameters involving feedback. The mean scores of preceptors (2.6/3) and students (1.9/3) regarding instructors’ ability to answer questions were found to be significantly different (P= 0.01). Students and preceptors gave mean scores of 1.9 and 2.8, respectively, to a question regarding preceptors’ application of appropriate up-to-date knowledge to individual patients (P= 0.00). Significant differences were also noted between students and instructors regarding the degree to which preceptors encouraged students to evaluate their own performance (P= 0.01). Discrepancies were noted between students and preceptors regarding preceptors’ teaching behaviors. Preceptors rated their teaching behaviors more highly than students did. Short-term training is warranted for preceptors to improve some aspects of their teaching skills.

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    Dania Alkhiyami, Salam Abou Safrah, Ahsan Sethi, Muhammad Abdul Hadi
    Pharmacy.2024; 12(3): 74.     CrossRef
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    Roland N Okoro, John David Ohieku, Sani Ibn Yakubu
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    Sandy Diec, Pooja H. Patel, Nephy G. Samuel, Jose J. Hernandez-Munoz
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2021; 13(11): 1510.     CrossRef
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    Andrew D. Bartlett, Irene S. Um, Edward J. Luca, Ines Krass, Carl R. Schneider
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Dessalegn Asmelashe Gelayee, Gashaw Binega Mekonnen
    BMC Medical Education.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions