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Research article
Factors influencing the career preferences of medical students and interns: a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey from India  
Ruban Anand, Prakash Somi Sankaran
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:12.   Published online May 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.12
  • 17,327 View
  • 381 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 22 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The study aimed to identify the motivational factors and demographic variables influencing the career preferences of medical students in India.
Methods
We conducted a questionnaire-based survey at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. The participants were 368 of the 460 medical students and interns enrolled at the institution from October 2015 to August 2016. We designed the questionnaire to collect demographic data, students’ preferences for career specialties, and the motivational factors influencing them. Then, we analyzed the influence of these factors and demographic variables on career preferences using regression analysis.
Results
Of the 368 respondents, 356 (96.7%) expressed their intention to pursue a residency program after the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program, and about two-thirds indicated their preference to do so in India. The specialties most preferred by students were general surgery, general medicine (internal medicine), and pediatrics, while the least preferred were anatomy, obstetrics and gynecology, and community medicine. Factor analysis yielded three motivational factors, which we named ‘personal growth,’ ‘professional growth,’ and ‘personal satisfaction’ based on the items loaded in each. The motivational factors were predicted by demographic variables (gender, geographical background, current stage in the MBBS program, and the presence of relatives in the health professions). Demographic variables and the motivational factors also had significant influences on career preferences.
Conclusion
This study provides insights into the motivational factors that influence the career preferences of Indian medical students and interns. A robust longitudinal study would be required to study intra-individual variations in preferences and the persistence of choices.

Citations

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    Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences.2021; 10(42): 3633.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 20.     CrossRef
  • Why are India’s Best Medical Graduates not Preferring ENT for Postgraduate Training Through NEET-PG?
    Ahmad Ozair, Abhishek Bahadur Singh
    Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.2020; 72(4): 535.     CrossRef
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Research Articles
Factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among 4,669 clinical medical students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China  
Yunbo Qing, Guijie Hu, Qingyun Chen, Hailun Peng, Kailan Li, Jinling Wei, Yanhua Yi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:40.   Published online July 10, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.40
  • 30,028 View
  • 169 Download
  • 12 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
To produce competent undergraduate-level medical doctors for rural township health centers (THCs), the Chinese government mandated that medical colleges in Central and Western China recruit rural-oriented, tuition-waived medical students (RTMSs) starting in 2010. This study aimed to identify and assess factors that influence the choice to work in rural township health centers among both RTMSs and other students from five medical universities in Guangxi, China. Methods: An internet-based self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted with medical students in Guangxi province. Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the attitudes toward work in a rural township health center. Results: Among 4,669 medical students, 1,523 (33%) had a positive attitude and 2,574 (55%) had a neutral attitude toward working in THCs. Demographic characteristics, personal job concerns, and knowledge of THCs were associated with the choice of a career in THCs. The factors related to a positive attitude included the following: three-year program, a rural-oriented medical program, being male, an expectation of working in a county or township, a focus on medical career development, some perceived difficulty of getting a job, having family support, sufficient knowledge of THCs, optimism toward THC development, seeking lower working pressure, and a lower expected monthly salary. Conclusion: Male students in a three-year program or a rural-oriented tuition-waived medical education program were more likely to work in THCs. Selecting medical students through interviews to identify their family support and intentions to work in THCs would increase recruitment and retention. Establishing favorable policies and financial incentives to improve living conditions and the social status of rural physicians is necessary.

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Is it time for integration of surgical skills simulation into the United Kingdom undergraduate medical curriculum? A perspective from King’s College London School of Medicine  
Hamaoui Karim, Sadideen Hazim, Saadeddin Munir, Onida Sarah, Hoey Andrew W, Rees John
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:10.   Published online December 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.10
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  • 180 Download
  • 19 Crossref
PDF

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Research article
Evaluation of a systematic career coaching program for medical students in Korea using the Career Readiness Inventory  
Yera Hur, A Ra Cho, Eun Ji Song, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:10.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.10
  • 35,693 View
  • 362 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to implement a systematic career coaching program for medical students and to evaluate its effectiveness.
Methods
First-year medical students of Konyang University College of Medicine took part in the FLEX Mentoring II: Career Coaching Program from September to December in 2016 and 2017. This program included 16 weekly sessions, comprising a total of 32 hours. The students took the Career Readiness Inventory before and after the program, as a pre- and post-test of the program. Data from 100 students were used (46 students in 2016, 54 students in 2017) for the evaluation.
Results
Medical students’ career readiness pre-test was rated as medium. In particular, many students were at a low level in terms of ‘support from colleagues and peers’ (53.0%), ‘career decision’ (48.0%), and ‘efforts for job preparation’ (60.0%). After 16 sessions of a systematic career coaching program, their career readiness level showed a significant increase except for ‘career decision’ (t= 4.242, P= 0.001) and ‘independence’ (t= 0.731, P= 0.466), a sub-factor of ‘career maturity.’
Conclusion
The career readiness level of medical students was not sufficiently high. However, a semester of educational training in a systematic career coaching program helped the students to be better prepared for their career. In particular, the significant reduction in the ‘career decision’ variable after the program can be interpreted as indicating that the students changed their behavior to explore and approach their career more seriously and carefully, which also underscores the need for the implementation of career coaching programs in medical schools.

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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions