Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
25 "Care"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Reviews
Attraction and achievement as 2 attributes of gamification in healthcare: an evolutionary concept analysis  
Hyun Kyoung Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2024;21:10.   Published online April 11, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2024.21.10
  • 341 View
  • 160 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study conducted a conceptual analysis of gamification in healthcare utilizing Rogers’ evolutionary concept analysis methodology to identify its attributes and provide a method for its applications in the healthcare field. Gamification has recently been used as a health intervention and education method, but the concept is used inconsistently and confusingly. A literature review was conducted to derive definitions, surrogate terms, antecedents, influencing factors, attributes (characteristics with dimensions and features), related concepts, consequences, implications, and hypotheses from various academic fields. A total of 56 journal articles in English and Korean, published between August 2 and August 7, 2023, were extracted from databases such as PubMed Central, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Computing Machinery Digital Library, the Research Information Sharing Service, and the Korean Studies Information Service System, using the keywords “gamification” and “healthcare.” These articles were then analyzed. Gamification in healthcare is defined as the application of game elements in health-related contexts to improve health outcomes. The attributes of this concept were categorized into 2 main areas: attraction and achievement. These categories encompass various strategies for synchronization, enjoyable engagement, visual rewards, and goal-reinforcing frames. Through a multidisciplinary analysis of the concept’s attributes and influencing factors, this paper provides practical strategies for implementing gamification in health interventions. When developing a gamification strategy, healthcare providers can reference this analysis to ensure the game elements are used both appropriately and effectively.
How to review and assess a systematic review and meta-analysis article: a methodological study (secondary publication)  
Seung-Kwon Myung
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2023;20:24.   Published online August 27, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2023.20.24
  • 3,581 View
  • 362 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have become central in many research fields, particularly medicine. They offer the highest level of evidence in evidence-based medicine and support the development and revision of clinical practice guidelines, which offer recommendations for clinicians caring for patients with specific diseases and conditions. This review summarizes the concepts of systematic reviews and meta-analyses and provides guidance on reviewing and assessing such papers. A systematic review refers to a review of a research question that uses explicit and systematic methods to identify, select, and critically appraise relevant research. In contrast, a meta-analysis is a quantitative statistical analysis that combines individual results on the same research question to estimate the common or mean effect. Conducting a meta-analysis involves defining a research topic, selecting a study design, searching literature in electronic databases, selecting relevant studies, and conducting the analysis. One can assess the findings of a meta-analysis by interpreting a forest plot and a funnel plot and by examining heterogeneity. When reviewing systematic reviews and meta-analyses, several essential points must be considered, including the originality and significance of the work, the comprehensiveness of the database search, the selection of studies based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, subgroup analyses by various factors, and the interpretation of the results based on the levels of evidence. This review will provide readers with helpful guidance to help them read, understand, and evaluate these articles.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Role of BIM in Managing Risks in Sustainability of Bridge Projects: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis
    Dema Munef Ahmad, László Gáspár, Zsolt Bencze, Rana Ahmad Maya
    Sustainability.2024; 16(3): 1242.     CrossRef
  • The impact of indoor carbon dioxide exposure on human brain activity: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on studies utilizing electroencephalogram signals
    Nan Zhang, Chao Liu, Caixia Hou, Wenhao Wang, Qianhui Yuan, Weijun Gao
    Building and Environment.2024; 259: 111687.     CrossRef
Research articles
Enhanced numeracy skills following team-based learning in United States pharmacy students: a longitudinal cohort study  
Rob Edwin Carpenter, Leanne Coyne, Dave Silberman, Jody Kyoto Takemoto
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:29.   Published online October 27, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.29
  • 1,738 View
  • 152 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The literature suggests that the ability to numerate cannot be fully understood without accounting for the social context in which mathematical activity is represented. Team-based learning (TBL) is an andragogical approach with theoretical links to sociocultural and community-of-practice learning. This study aimed to quantitatively explore the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development in 2 cohorts of pharmacy students and identify the impact of TBL instruction on numeracy development from a social perspective for healthcare education.
Methods
Two cohorts of students were administered the Health Science Reasoning Test-Numeracy (HSRT-N) before beginning pharmacy school. Two years after using TBL as the primary method of instruction, both comprehensive and domain data from the HSRT-N were analyzed.
Results
In total, 163 pharmacy student scores met the inclusion criteria. The students’ numeracy skills measured by HSRT-N improved after 2 years of TBL instruction.
Conclusion
Numeracy was the most significantly improved HSRT-N domain in pharmacy students following two years of TBL instruction. Although a closer examination of numeracy development in TBL is warranted, initial data suggest that TBL instruction may be an adequate proxy for advancing numeracy in a cohort of pharmacy students. TBL may encourage a social practice of mathematics to improve pharmacy students’ ability to numerate critically.
Content validity test of a safety checklist for simulated participants in simulation-based education in the United Kingdom: a methodological study
Matthew Bradley
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:21.   Published online August 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.21
  • 1,741 View
  • 158 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Simulation training is an ever-growing means of healthcare education and often involves simulated participants (SPs), commonly known as actors. Simulation-based education (SBE) can sometimes endanger SPs, and as such we have created a safety checklist for them to follow. This study describes how we developed the checklist through a quality improvement project, and then evaluated feedback responses to assess whether SPs felt our checklist was safe.
Methods
The checklist was provided to SPs working in an acute trust simulation service when delivering multidisciplinary SBE over 4 months. Using multiple plan–do–study–act cycles, the checklist was refined by reflecting on SP feedback to ensure that the standards of the safe simulation were met. We collected 21 responses from September to December 2021 after SPs completed an SBE event.
Results
The responses showed that 100% of SPs felt safe during SBE when using our checklist. The average “confidence in safety” rating before using the checklist was 6.8/10, which increased significantly to 9.2/10 after using the checklist (P<0.0005). The checklist was refined throughout the 4 months and implemented in adult and pediatric SBE as a standard operating procedure.
Conclusion
We recommend using our safety checklist as a standard operating procedure to improve the confidence and safety of SPs during safe and effective simulations.
Review
Characteristics and 10 key components of interpersonal caring: a narrative review  
Susie Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:17.   Published online July 25, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.17
  • 4,139 View
  • 260 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This paper aims to help people understand better the lives of people who are mentally ill by describing the general concept of the Interpersonal Caring Theory (ICT) and deducing 10 key components of interpersonal caring. The literature review described the definition of interpersonal caring, and its assumptions and characteristics. Furthermore, the authors’ experience with patient care suggested the critical components of interpersonal caring, which is the compassion-based therapeutic actions/behaviors through the collaborative partnership developed between nurse and client. Essential characteristics of interpersonal caring include the following: person-to-person interaction between nurse and patient, genuine love and concern toward the person, conveying trust and hope, transcending space, time, and culture, holistic approach expressed through a comprehensive and dynamic mode of communication, helping the patient focus on their self-worth, and providing culturally relevant and sensitive nursing. Ten key components of interpersonal caring in ICT include noticing, participating, sharing, active listening, companioning, complimenting, comforting, hoping, forgiving, and accepting. Interpersonal caring results from the blended understanding of the empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and intuitive aspects of a given clinical situation, and a nexus of pre-conditions, content, feelings, and sense of self-worth/self-esteem.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Disparidades de salud en el mundo real de los pacientes con esclerosis múltiple
    Roberto Rotta Escalante, Osvaldo Fustinoni, María Elisa Barone, José R. Elli, María del Carmen Martínez Perea
    Neurología Argentina.2023; 15(1): 37.     CrossRef
Research articles
Doctoral physical therapy students’ increased confidence following exploration of active video gaming systems in a problem-based learning curriculum in the United States: a pre- and post-intervention study  
Michelle Elizabeth Wormley, Wendy Romney, Diana Veneri, Andrea Oberlander
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:7.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.7
  • 7,639 View
  • 294 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Active video gaming (AVG) is used in physical therapy (PT) to treat individuals with a variety of diagnoses across the lifespan. The literature supports improvements in balance, cardiovascular endurance, and motor control; however, evidence is lacking regarding the implementation of AVG in PT education. This study investigated doctoral physical therapy (DPT) students’ confidence following active exploration of AVG systems as a PT intervention in the United States.
Methods
This pretest-posttest study included 60 DPT students in 2017 (cohort 1) and 55 students in 2018 (cohort 2) enrolled in a problem-based learning curriculum. AVG systems were embedded into patient cases and 2 interactive laboratory classes across 2 consecutive semesters (April–December 2017 and April–December 2018). Participants completed a 31-question survey before the intervention and 8 months later. Students’ confidence was rated for general use, game selection, plan of care, set-up, documentation, setting, and demographics. Descriptive statistics and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to compare differences in confidence pre- and post-intervention.
Results
Both cohorts showed increased confidence at the post-test, with median (interquartile range) scores as follows: cohort 1: pre-test, 57.1 (44.3–63.5); post-test, 79.1 (73.1–85.4); and cohort 2: pre-test, 61.4 (48.0–70.7); post-test, 89.3 (80.0–93.2). Cohort 2 was significantly more confident at baseline than cohort 1 (P<0.05). In cohort 1, students’ data were paired and confidence levels significantly increased in all domains: use, Z=-6.2 (P<0.01); selection, Z=-5.9 (P<0.01); plan of care, Z=-6.0 (P<0.01); set-up, Z=-5.5 (P<0.01); documentation, Z=-6.0 (P<0.01); setting, Z=-6.3 (P<0.01); and total score, Z=-6.4 (P<0.01).
Conclusion
Structured, active experiences with AVG resulted in a significant increase in students’ confidence. As technology advances in healthcare delivery, it is essential to expose students to these technologies in the classroom.
Key competencies for Korean nurses in prenatal genetic nursing: experiential genetic nursing knowledge, and ethics and law  
Gyeyoung Shin, Myunghee Jun, Hye-Kyung Kim, Michael Wreen, Sylvia Mimi Kubsch
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:36.   Published online November 26, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.36
  • 4,901 View
  • 156 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aims at determining the competencies of Korean nurses in prenatal genetic nursing.
Methods
First, a 3-round Delphi survey was conducted to establish prenatal genetic nursing competencies. Second, a prenatal genetic nursing education program (PGNEP), incorporating the findings from the Delphi survey, was designed. Third, a single group pre- and post-quasi-experimental study at a PGNEP workshop was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the integration of the competencies into the PGNEP with the measurements of knowledge about prenatal genetic testing and nursing (K-PGTN) and information needs about prenatal genetic testing and nursing (I-PGTN). Finally, the identified competencies were reexamined for their clarity.
Results
Based on the Delphi survey 78 competency components were identified. The components were then classified under 10 categories, which were organized under 4 domains. The domain of “experiential genetic nursing knowledge” and the domain of “ethics and law” were ranked as the first and the second in significance. The quasi-experimental study showed that the mean scores in K-PGTN were significantly increased from 8.19±2.67 to 11.25±2.51 (P<0.001). The mean scores of “ethics and law” in I-PGTN decreased significantly (P=0.023). The headings of 4 categories and 2 domains were revised.
Conclusion
This study identified competencies for prenatal genetic nursing and nursing education in Korea. There is a need for nursing instructors and researchers to improve the competencies of nurses in the identified areas. Particular emphasis should be placed on experiential nursing knowledge and on ethics and law related to prenatal genetic nursing.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Current State of Genomics in Nursing: A Scoping Review of Healthcare Provider Oriented (Clinical and Educational) Outcomes (2012–2022)
    Joanne Thomas, Jordan Keels, Kathleen A. Calzone, Laurie Badzek, Sarah Dewell, Christine Patch, Emma T. Tonkin, Andrew A. Dwyer
    Genes.2023; 14(11): 2013.     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Guidelines for the management of extravasation  
Jung Tae Kim, Jeong Yun Park, Hyun Jung Lee, Young Ju Cheon
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:21.   Published online August 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.21
  • 23,908 View
  • 1,458 Download
  • 32 Web of Science
  • 36 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The purpose of these practice guidelines is to offer and share strategies for preventing extravasation and measures for handling drugs known to cause tissue necrosis, which may occur even with the most skilled experts at intravenous (IV) injection. Herein, general knowledge about extravasation is first described, including its definition, incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and extravasation injuries. Management of extravasation includes nursing intervention and thermal application. At the first sign of extravasation, nursing intervention with following steps is recommended: stop administration of IV fluids immediately, disconnect the IV tube from the cannula, aspirate any remaining drug from the cannula, administer drug-specific antidote, and notify the physician. Local thermal treatments are used to decrease the site reaction and absorption of the infiltrate. Local cooling (ice packs) aids in vasoconstriction, theoretically limiting the drug dispersion. Although clear benefit has not been demonstrated with thermal applications, it remains a standard supportive care. The recommended application schedule for both warm and cold applications is 15 to 20 minutes, every 4 hours, for 24 to 48 hours. For prevention of extravasation, health professionals should be familiar with the extravasation management standard guidelines. They should regularly check the extravasation kit, assess patients’ sensory changes, tingling or burning, and always pay attention to patients’ words. The medical team’s continuous education on extravasation is essential. With the practical use of these guidelines, it is expected to reduce the occurrence rate of extravasation and contribute to patient care improvement.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extravasation of monoclonal antibodies commonly used in oncology: Classification, management and the role of the pharmacist
    Tiene Bauters, Nele Clottens, María A Albert-Marí
    Journal of Oncology Pharmacy Practice.2024; 30(3): 488.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the multifaceted effects of Ammi visnaga : subchronic toxicity, antioxidant capacity, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory activities
    Martin Ndayambaje, Hicham Wahnou, Marieme Sow, Oumaima Chgari, Thierry Habyarimana, Mehdi Karkouri, Youness Limami, Abdallah Naya, Mounia Oudghiri
    Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A.2024; 87(4): 150.     CrossRef
  • Acyclovir extravasation in a newborn: a case report
    Shirin Shamel, Mohammad Reza Zarkesh
    Journal of Medical Case Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Extravasation and infiltration: under-recognised complications of intravenous therapy
    Andrew Barton
    British Journal of Nursing.2024; 33(7): S18.     CrossRef
  • Safe and Informed Use of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent in Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Where We Were and Where We Are
    Francesca Iacobellis, Marco Di Serafino, Camilla Russo, Roberto Ronza, Martina Caruso, Giuseppina Dell’Aversano Orabona, Costanza Camillo, Vittorio Sabatino, Dario Grimaldi, Chiara Rinaldo, Luigi Barbuto, Francesco Verde, Giuliana Giacobbe, Maria Laura Sc
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(8): 2193.     CrossRef
  • Integrating human expertise & automated methods for a dynamic and multi-parametric evaluation of large language models’ feasibility in clinical decision-making
    Elena Sblendorio, Vincenzo Dentamaro, Alessio Lo Cascio, Francesco Germini, Michela Piredda, Giancarlo Cicolini
    International Journal of Medical Informatics.2024; 188: 105501.     CrossRef
  • Nurses’ knowledge and experience related to short peripheral venous catheter extravasation
    Selma Atay, Şengül Üzen Cura, Sevda Efil
    The Journal of Vascular Access.2023; 24(4): 848.     CrossRef
  • An updated narrative review on the management of the most common oncological and hematological emergencies
    Ali Issani
    Disease-a-Month.2023; 69(2): 101355.     CrossRef
  • Peripheral venous extravasation injury
    M.J. Billingham, R. Mittal
    BJA Education.2023; 23(2): 42.     CrossRef
  • Extravasation injuries in the intravenous therapy with drugs with properties vesicants and irritants in the veterinary medicine of small animals
    Paolo Ruggero Errante
    Journal of Dairy, Veterinary & Animal Research.2023; 12(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • Sensing Technologies for Extravasation Detection: A Review
    Ikue Hirata, Arianna Mazzotta, Pooyan Makvandi, Ilaria Cesini, Chiara Brioschi, Andrea Ferraris, Virgilio Mattoli
    ACS Sensors.2023; 8(3): 1017.     CrossRef
  • Skin Staining Following Intravenous Iron Extravasation in a Patient With Chronic Kidney Disease: A Case Report
    Ruolin Shi, Judith G. Marin, Monica Beaulieu
    Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease.2023; 10: 205435812311657.     CrossRef
  • Extravasation of Noncytotoxic Agents: Skin Injury and Risk Classification
    Yuuka Shibata, Takanori Taogoshi, Hiroaki Matsuo
    Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin.2023; 46(6): 746.     CrossRef
  • Radiopharmaceutical extravasation in bone scintigraphy: a cross-sectional study
    Davide Fernandes, Márcia Santos, Miguel Pinheiro, Hugo Duarte, Filipa Fontes
    Nuclear Medicine Communications.2023; 44(10): 870.     CrossRef
  • Compartment Syndrome Secondary to Calcium Gluconate Extravasation
    Derek S Weimer, Sydney Jones, Tanya Ramadoss, Una Milovanovic, Mohammadali M Shoja, Gary Schwartz
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Profiles and Outcomes of Skin Injuries Caused by Injectable Drug Extravasation
    Mika Maezawa, Misaki Inoue, Riko Satake, Wataru Wakabayashi, Keita Oura, Koumi Miyasaka, Sakiko Hirofuji, Fumiya Goto, Mari Iwata, Takaaki Suzuki, Hideyuki Tanaka, Megumi Horibe, Satoshi Nakao, Toshikazu Tsuji, Ichiro Ieiri, Kazuhiro Iguchi, Mitsuhiro Nak
    Journal of Infusion Nursing.2023; 46(5): 281.     CrossRef
  • Tissue Necrosis Following Extravasation of Human Immunoglobulin in an Infant
    Yu Jing, Wanyu Jia, Peng Li, Chunlan Song
    Clinical Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Extravasation of Non-Cytotoxic Drugs in Older People
    T’yanna Montague, Salome Bwayo Weaver, La’Marcus T. Wingate
    The Senior Care Pharmacist.2023; 38(11): 457.     CrossRef
  • A temperature-responsive intravenous needle that irreversibly softens on insertion
    Karen-Christian Agno, Keungmo Yang, Sang-Hyuk Byun, Subin Oh, Simok Lee, Heesoo Kim, Kyurae Kim, Sungwoo Cho, Won-Il Jeong, Jae-Woong Jeong
    Nature Biomedical Engineering.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Pharmacoprophylaxis on Postoperative Outcomes in Adult Elective Colorectal Surgery: A Multi-Center Retrospective Cohort Study within an Enhanced Recovery after Surgery Framework
    William Olin Blair, Mary Allison Ellis, Maria Fada, Austin Allen Wiggins, Rachel C. Wolfe, Gourang P. Patel, Kara K. Brockhaus, Molly Droege, Laura M. Ebbitt, Brian Kramer, Eric Likar, Kerilyn Petrucci, Sapna Shah, Jerusha Taylor, Paula Bingham, Samuel Kr
    Healthcare.2023; 11(23): 3060.     CrossRef
  • Progress in Research on the Mechanisms and Interventions of Phlebitis from the Perspective of Vascular Endothelial Cell and Signaling Pathway
    Ling-Ling Zhu, Yan-hong Wang, Quan Zhou
    Journal of Inflammation Research.2023; Volume 16: 6469.     CrossRef
  • Cutaneous Management after Extravasation of High-Concentrated Amino Acid Solution Administered for Renal Protection in PRRT
    Chaninart Sakulpisuti, Wichana Chamroonrat, Supatporn Tepmongkol
    Tomography.2022; 8(1): 356.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Onkologie up2date.2022; 4(02): 116.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding management of extravasation of chemotherapeutic drugs
    Prakash Pooja, Chandra Ayush , Kotha Malathi , Das Santosh Kumar , Prakash Barsha , Chandra Avinash , Sherpa Gyaljin , Acharya Sudikshya
    Insights on the Depression and Anxiety.2022; 6(1): 018.     CrossRef
  • Intervenção de enfermagem perante o extravasamento de citostáticos - um contributo na prevenção da queimadura química
    Ana Marcelino, Marta Ganhão
    Onco.News.2022; (45): e067.     CrossRef
  • Yenidoğan yoğun bakım ünitesinde çalışan sağlık personelinin ekstravazasyon bilgi birikimi ve yönetimi
    Ayşen ORMAN, Yalçın ÇELİK, Nihan ÖZEL ERÇEL
    Mersin Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; 15(3): 465.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Frauenheilkunde up2date.2021; 15(02): 107.     CrossRef
  • Tissue distribution of epirubicin after severe extravasation in humans
    Jakob Nedomansky, Werner Haslik, Ursula Pluschnig, Christoph Kornauth, Christine Deutschmann, Stefan Hacker, Günther G. Steger, Rupert Bartsch, Robert M. Mader
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology.2021; 88(2): 203.     CrossRef
  • Novel Conformal Skin Patch with Embedded Thin-Film Electrodes for Early Detection of Extravasation
    Ruiqi Lim, Ramona B. Damalerio, Choon Looi Bong, Swee Kim Tan, Ming-Yuan Cheng
    Sensors.2021; 21(10): 3429.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of combination of localized closure, ethacridine lactate dressing, and phototherapy in treatment of severe extravasation injuries: A case series
    Yan-Xu Lu, Ying Wu, Peng-Fei Liang, Rong-Chan Wu, Ling-Yun Tian, Hui-Ying Mo
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(18): 4599.     CrossRef
  • Modern approaches for long-term venous access in oncology
    Yu.V. Buydenok
    Onkologiya. Zhurnal imeni P.A.Gertsena.2021; 10(3): 69.     CrossRef
  • Elaboration and validation of an algorithm for treating peripheral intravenous infiltration and extravasation in children
    Luciano Marques dos Santos, Katharinne de Jesus Nunes, Cleonara Sousa Gomes e Silva, Denise Miyuki Kusahara, Elisa da Conceição Rodrigues, Ariane Ferreira Machado Avelar
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measuring the Validity and Reliability of the Vascular Access Complication Staging and Treatment Instrument in a Pediatric Population
    Genieveve J. Cline, Virginia Pohlod, Kristina J. Burger, Ernest K. Amankwah
    Journal of Infusion Nursing.2021; 44(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Chemotherapy Extravasation: Incidence of and Factors Associated With Events in a Community Cancer Center
    Nancy Ehmke
    Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing.2021; 25(6): 680.     CrossRef
  • Drug Extravasation in a Large General Hospital in Hunan, China: A Retrospective Survey
    Zhihong Gong, Jinghui Zhang, Jianmei Hou, Shujie Chen, Zixin Hu, Xiaoya Kong, Guiyuan Ma, Lingxia Luo
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 4931.     CrossRef
  • The Journal Citation Indicator has arrived for Emerging Sources Citation Index journals, including the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, in June 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 20.     CrossRef
Research articles
Self-care perspective taking and empathy in a student-faculty book club in the United States  
Rebecca Henderson, Melanie Gross Hagen, Zareen Zaidi, Valentina Dunder, Edlira Maska, Ying Nagoshi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:22.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.22
  • 7,438 View
  • 173 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We aimed to study the impact of a combined faculty-student book club on education and medical practice as a part of the informal curriculum at the University of Florida College of Medicine in the United States.
Methods
Sixteen medical students and 7 faculties who participated in the book club were interviewed through phone and recorded. The interview was then transcribed and entered into the qualitative data analysis program QSR NVivo (QSR International, Burlington, MA, USA). The transcripts were reviewed, and thematic codes were developed inductively through collaborative iteration. Based on these preliminary codes, a coding dictionary was developed and applied to all interviews within QSR Nvivo to identify themes.
Results
Four main themes were identified from interviews: The first theme, the importance of literature to the development and maintenance of empathy and perspective-taking, and the second theme, the importance of the book club in promoting mentorship, personal relationships and professional development, were important to both student and faculty participants. The third and fourth themes, the need for the book club as a tool for self-care and the book club serving as a reminder about the world outside of school were discussed by student book club members.
Conclusion
Our study demonstrated that an informal book club has a significant positive impact on self-care, perspective-taking, empathy, and developing a “world outside of school” for medical school students and faculty in the United States. It also helps to foster meaningful relationships between students and faculty.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Student-faculty dialogue: meaningful perspective taking on campus
    Tee R. Tyler
    Social Work With Groups.2024; 47(2): 165.     CrossRef
  • Clubes de lectura: una revisión sistemática internacional de estudios (2010-2022)
    Carmen Álvarez-Álvarez, Julián Pascual Díez
    Literatura: teoría, historia, crítica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The implementation of a required book club for medical students and faculty
    David B. Ney, Nethra Ankam, Anita Wilson, John Spandorfer
    Medical Education Online.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cultivating critical consciousness through a Global Health Book Club
    Sarah L. Collins, Stuart J. Case, Alexandra K. Rodriguez, Acquel C. Allen, Elizabeth A. Wood
    Frontiers in Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advancing book clubs as non-formal learning to facilitate critical public pedagogy in organizations
    Robin S Grenier, Jamie L Callahan, Kristi Kaeppel, Carole Elliott
    Management Learning.2022; 53(3): 483.     CrossRef
  • Not Just for Patrons: Book Club Participation as Professional Development for Librarians
    Laila M. Brown, Valerie Brett Shaindlin
    The Library Quarterly.2021; 91(4): 420.     CrossRef
  • Medical Students’ Creation of Original Poetry, Comics, and Masks to Explore Professional Identity Formation
    Johanna Shapiro, Juliet McMullin, Gabriella Miotto, Tan Nguyen, Anju Hurria, Minh Anh Nguyen
    Journal of Medical Humanities.2021; 42(4): 603.     CrossRef
Evaluation of student perceptions with 2 interprofessional assessment tools—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale—following didactic and clinical learning experiences in the United States  
Vincent Dennis, Melissa Craft, Dale Bratzler, Melody Yozzo, Denise Bender, Christi Barbee, Stephen Neely, Margaret Robinson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:35.   Published online November 5, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.35
  • 10,157 View
  • 224 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated changes in students’ attitudes using 2 validated interprofessional survey instruments—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning (CHIRP) instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale (IPAS)—before and after didactic and clinical cohorts.
Methods
Students from 7 colleges/schools participated in didactic and clinical cohorts during the 2017–2018 year. Didactic cohorts experienced 2 interactive sessions 6 months apart, while clinical cohorts experienced 4 outpatient clinical sessions once monthly. For the baseline and post-cohort assessments, 865 students were randomly assigned to complete either the 14-item CHIRP or the 27-item IPAS. The Pittman test using permutations of linear ranks was used to determine differences in the score distribution between the baseline and post-cohort assessments. Pooled results were compared for the CHIRP total score and the IPAS total and subdomain scores. For each score, 3 comparisons were made simultaneously: overall baseline versus post-didactic cohort, overall baseline versus post-clinical cohort, and post-didactic cohort versus post-clinical cohort. Alpha was adjusted to 0.0167 to account for simultaneous comparisons.
Results
The baseline and post-cohort survey response rates were 62.4% and 65.9% for CHIRP and 58.7% and 58.1% for IPAS, respectively. The post-clinical cohort scores for the IPAS subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities were significantly higher than the baseline and post-didactic cohort scores. No differences were seen for the remaining IPAS subdomain scores or the CHIRP instrument total score.
Conclusion
The IPAS instrument may discern changes in student attitudes in the subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities following short-term clinical experiences involving diverse interprofessional team members.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Interprofessional communication skills training to improve medical students’ and nursing trainees’ error communication - quasi-experimental pilot study
    Lina Heier, Barbara Schellenberger, Anna Schippers, Sebastian Nies, Franziska Geiser, Nicole Ernstmann
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and implementation of interprofessional education activity among health professions students in Jordan: A pilot investigation
    Osama Y. Alshogran, Zaid Al-Hamdan, Alla El-Awaisi, Hana Alkhalidy, Nesreen Saadeh, Hadeel Alsqaier
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2023; 37(4): 588.     CrossRef
  • Tools for faculty assessment of interdisciplinary competencies of healthcare students: an integrative review
    Sharon Brownie, Denise Blanchard, Isaac Amankwaa, Patrick Broman, Marrin Haggie, Carlee Logan, Amy Pearce, Kesava Sampath, Ann-Rong Yan, Patrea Andersen
    Frontiers in Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education tracks: One schools response to common IPE barriers
    Kim G. Adcock, Sally Earl
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2023; 15(5): 528.     CrossRef
  • Interprofessional education and collaborative practice in Nigeria – Pharmacists' and pharmacy students' attitudes and perceptions of the obstacles and recommendations
    Segun J. Showande, Tolulope P. Ibirongbe
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2023; 15(9): 787.     CrossRef
  • To IPAS or not to IPAS? Examining the construct validity of the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale in Hong Kong
    Fraide A. Ganotice, Amy Yin Man Chow, Kelvin Kai Hin Fan, Ui Soon Khoo, May Pui San Lam, Rebecca Po Wah Poon, Francis Hang Sang Tsoi, Michael Ning Wang, George L. Tipoe
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Turkish adaptation of the interprofessional attitude scale (IPAS)
    Mukadder Inci Baser Kolcu, Ozlem Surel Karabilgin Ozturkcu, Giray Kolcu
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(5): 684.     CrossRef
  • Patient participation in interprofessional learning and collaboration with undergraduate health professional students in clinical placements: A scoping review
    Catrine Buck Jensen, Bente Norbye, Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Anita Iversen
    Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice.2022; 27: 100494.     CrossRef
  • Can interprofessional education change students’ attitudes? A case study from Lebanon
    Carine J. Sakr, Lina Fakih, Jocelyn Dejong, Nuhad Yazbick-Dumit, Hussein Soueidan, Wiam Haidar, Elias Boufarhat, Imad Bou Akl
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief report
Higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career among Spanish-speaking physician assistant students after their volunteer work at a student-run free clinic in the United States  
Shannon Weaver, Zainub Hussaini, Virginia Lynn Valentin, Samin Panahi, Sarah Elizabeth Levitt, Jeanie Ashby, Akiko Kamimura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:27.   Published online September 6, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.27
  • 23,486 View
  • 165 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Volunteering at a free clinic may influence career choice among health profession students. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, skills, attitudes, self-efficacy, interest in future work with the underserved, and interest in primary care among physician assistant (PA) students through an analysis of demographic characteristics of PA students at a student-run free clinic in the United States. Data were collected from 56 PA students through a quantitative survey in October 2018 after their participation at a student-run free clinic in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the intermountain west region of the USA. Out of the 3 sub-scales (attitudes, effect, and readiness), students responded most positively to items exploring the effect of their experiences of volunteering at the free clinic. Students who spoke Spanish showed higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career than non-Spanish speakers.
Research articles
Development of a self-assessment tool for resident doctors’ communication skills in India  
Upendra Baitha, Piyush Ranjan, Siddharth Sarkar, Charu Arora, Archana Kumari, Sada Nand Dwivedi, Asmita Patil, Nayer Jamshed
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:17.   Published online June 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.17
  • 14,432 View
  • 264 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Effective communication skills are essential for resident doctors to provide optimum patient care. This study was conducted to develop and validate a questionnaire for the self-assessment of resident doctors’ communication skills in India.
Methods
This was a mixed-methods study conducted in 2 phases. The first phase consisted of questionnaire development, including the identification of relevant literature, focus group discussions with residents and experts from clinical specialties, and pre-testing of the questionnaire. The second phase involved administering the questionnaire survey to 95 residents from the Departments of Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, and Surgery at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India in April 2019. Internal consistency was tested and the factor structure was analyzed to test construct validity.
Results
The questionnaire consisted of 3 sections: (A) 4 items on doctor-patient conflicts and the role of communication skills in avoiding these conflicts, (B) 29 items on self-assessment of communication skills in different settings, and (C) 8 items on barriers to practicing good communication skills. Sections B and C had good internal consistency (Cronbach α: 0.885 and 0.771, respectively). Section C had a 2-factor solution, and the barriers were classified as ‘training’ and ‘infrastructure’ factors.
Conclusion
This appears to be a valid assessment tool of resident doctors’ communication skills, with potential utility for identifying gaps in communication skills and developing communication skills modules.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development and Validation of a Comprehensive Nursing Competence Assessment Questionnaire (CNCAQ) to Determine the Perceived Clinical Competence of Nursing Graduates
    Sunita Srivastava, Hariprasath Pandurangan, Anil Kumar
    Nursing & Midwifery Research Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Leveraging the vantage point – exploring nurses’ perception of residents’ communication skills: a mixed-methods study
    Komal Abdul Rahim, Maryam Pyar Ali Lakhdir, Noreen Afzal, Asma Altaf Hussain Merchant, Namra Qadeer Shaikh, Ali Aahil Noorali, Umar Tariq, Rida Ahmad, Saqib Kamran Bakhshi, Saad bin Zafar Mahmood, Muhammad Rizwan Khan, Muhammed Tariq, Adil H. Haider
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Developing a communication-skills training curriculum for resident-physicians to enhance patient outcomes at an academic medical centre: an ongoing mixed-methods study protocol
    Hamna Shahbaz, Ali Aahil Noorali, Maha Inam, Namra Qadeer, Asma Altaf Hussain Merchant, Adnan Ali Khan, Noreen Afzal, Komal Abdul Rahim, Ibrahim Munaf, Rida Ahmad, Muhammad Tariq, Adil H Haider
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(8): e056840.     CrossRef
  • A cross-sectional evaluation of communication skills and perceived barriers among the resident doctors at a tertiary care center in India
    Amandeep Singh, Piyush Ranjan, Archana Kumari, Siddharth Sarkar, Tanveer Kaur, Ramesh Aggarwal, AshishDatt Upadhyay, Biswaroop Chakrawarty, Jamshed Nayer, Mohit Joshi, Avinash Chakrawarty
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2022; 11(1): 425.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a questionnaire to assess preventive practices against COVID-19 pandemic in the general population
    Ayush Agarwal, Piyush Ranjan, Priyanka Rohilla, Yellamraju Saikaustubh, Anamika Sahu, Sada Nand Dwivedi, Aakansha, Upendra Baitha, Arvind Kumar
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2021; 22: 101339.     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of a Comprehensive Questionnaire to Assess Interpersonal Discord (Bullying, Harassment, and Discrimination) at the Workplace in a Healthcare Setting
    Amandeep Singh, Piyush Ranjan, Tanveer Kaur, Siddharth Sarkar, Ashish D Upadhyay, Upendra Baitha, Prayas Sethi, Ranveer S Jadon, Pankaj Jorwal
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and Validation of a Questionnaire to Evaluate Workplace Violence in Healthcare Settings
    Archana Kumari, Amandeep Singh, Piyush Ranjan, Siddharth Sarkar, Tanveer Kaur, Ashish D Upadhyay, Kirti Verma, Vignan Kappagantu, Ajay Mohan, Upendra Baitha
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The value of communicating with patients in their first language
    Piyush Ranjan, Archana Kumari, Charu Arora
    Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research.2020; 20(6): 559.     CrossRef
Factors influencing the career preferences of medical students and interns: a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey from India  
Ruban Anand, Prakash Somi Sankaran
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:12.   Published online May 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.12
  • 17,430 View
  • 382 Download
  • 19 Web of Science
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The study aimed to identify the motivational factors and demographic variables influencing the career preferences of medical students in India.
Methods
We conducted a questionnaire-based survey at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. The participants were 368 of the 460 medical students and interns enrolled at the institution from October 2015 to August 2016. We designed the questionnaire to collect demographic data, students’ preferences for career specialties, and the motivational factors influencing them. Then, we analyzed the influence of these factors and demographic variables on career preferences using regression analysis.
Results
Of the 368 respondents, 356 (96.7%) expressed their intention to pursue a residency program after the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) program, and about two-thirds indicated their preference to do so in India. The specialties most preferred by students were general surgery, general medicine (internal medicine), and pediatrics, while the least preferred were anatomy, obstetrics and gynecology, and community medicine. Factor analysis yielded three motivational factors, which we named ‘personal growth,’ ‘professional growth,’ and ‘personal satisfaction’ based on the items loaded in each. The motivational factors were predicted by demographic variables (gender, geographical background, current stage in the MBBS program, and the presence of relatives in the health professions). Demographic variables and the motivational factors also had significant influences on career preferences.
Conclusion
This study provides insights into the motivational factors that influence the career preferences of Indian medical students and interns. A robust longitudinal study would be required to study intra-individual variations in preferences and the persistence of choices.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical students’ career preferences in Bangladesh
    Mohammad Azmain Iktidar, Md Muid Sakib, Ummi Rukaiya Munni, Fahmida Hoque Rimti, Renessa Yousuf, Koushik Majumder, Tirtha Saha, Farhat Lamisa Golpo, Md Samee U Sayed, Sabrina Monsur, Asadul Al Galib, Md Kamran Hossain, Sigma Alam Shupti, Noshin Nawar, Sud
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting the choice of medical specialties in Turkiye: an analysis based on cross-sectional survey of medical graduates
    Mustafa Said Yıldız, M. Mahmud Khan
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A qualitative study of career decision making among African and Asian international medical students in China: process, challenges, and strategies
    Wen Li, Hong Sun, Asaduzzaman Khan, Robyn Gillies
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Specialty preferences of undergraduate medical students: What do they choose and why?
    Aditya Amit Godbole, Gauri A. Oka, Mrunal N. Ketkar, Rajvardhan Singh Solanki, Dhruvi T. Desai, Sejal V. Bangale, Atharva S. Rele
    Medical Journal Armed Forces India.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Specialties preference by gender among medical students at Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, South Africa
    Andiswa Pooe, Samuel T. Ntuli, Sizwe Masango, Aqila Rab, Thiambi Mudau, Pollet M. Mantsho, Sifundo Mtshali
    South African Family Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Teaching in radiation oncology: now and 2025—results of a focus group with medical students
    Philipp Linde, Marie Klein, Frauke Lang, Simone Wegen, Cordula Petersen, Hendrik Dapper, Jiaqi Fan, Eren Celik, Simone Marnitz, Christian Baues
    Strahlentherapie und Onkologie.2023; 199(4): 360.     CrossRef
  • Electives in Indian medical education: An opportunity to seize
    Medha Mathur, Navgeet Mathur, Anjana Verma, Manjinder Kaur, Ashish Patyal
    Adesh University Journal of Medical Sciences & Research.2023; 4: 53.     CrossRef
  • Specialty preferences of studying-abroad medical students from low- and middle-income countries
    Wen Li, Robyn M. Gillies, Chang Liu, Changhao Wu, Jiayi Chen, Xiaoning Zhang, Bin Cheng, Jing Dai, Ning Fu, Lin Li, Shenjun Liu, Hong Sun
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring Specialty Selection and Influencing Factors among Medical Students and Postgraduates: An Observational Study
    Muhammad Maaz Arif, Wardah Nisar , Khadija Agha , Muzammil Ghaffar Qureshi, Amen Mansoor, Asad Ullah Malik, Muhammad Sohaib Khokhar, Fatima Awan, Sarah Irfan Khwaja, Aqsa Parveen
    Pakistan Journal of Health Sciences.2023; : 263.     CrossRef
  • Perception of Oncology Evaluated by Medical Students (P.O.E.M.S)—a Single Institutional Study
    Pritha Roy, Abhishek Basu, Debdeep Samaddar, Hambir Chowdhury
    Journal of Cancer Education.2022; 37(3): 709.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on career intention amongst undergraduate medical students: a single-centre cross-sectional study conducted in Hubei Province
    Xue-lin Wang, Ming-xiu Liu, Shuai Peng, Lei Yang, Chen Lu, Shi-cong Shou, Jian-ru Wang, Jun-yi Sun, Jia-qi Wang, Yan Hu, Jun Zhao, Peng Duan
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • What do Iranian physicians value most when choosing a specialty? Evidence from a discrete choice experiment
    Yaser Sarikhani, Sulmaz Ghahramani, Sisira Edirippulige, Yoshikazu Fujisawa, Matthew Bambling, Peivand Bastani
    Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fatores contribuintes para escolha da pediatria como especialidade médica
    Pedro Guerra Júnior, Mônica Ramos Daltro
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fatores contribuintes para escolha da pediatria como especialidade médica
    Pedro Guerra Júnior, Mônica Ramos Daltro
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Will you choose neurosurgery as your career? An Indian female medical student perspective
    Bhavya Pahwa, Mayank Kalyani, Ishika Jain, Suchanda Bhattacharjee
    Journal of Clinical Neuroscience.2022; 105: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Future of Pulmonary Medicine Physician Work-Force in India
    Ahmad Ozair, Surya Kant
    The Indian Journal of Chest Diseases and Allied Sciences.2022; 62(4): 233.     CrossRef
  • A thematic network for factors affecting the choice of specialty education by medical students: a scoping study in low-and middle-income countries
    Yaser Sarikhani, Sulmaz Ghahramani, Mohsen Bayati, Farhad Lotfi, Peivand Bastani
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors and Determinants of Choosing Pathology as a Future Career: Results From a Multi-Institution Study
    Emad M Masuadi, Mohamud S Mohamud, Abdulrahman M Alhassan, Khalid G Alharbi, Ahmed S Hilabi, Faisal A Alharbi, Abdullah T Tatwani, Abdullah I Farraj, Sami Al-Nasser, Mohammed F Safi
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Online Survey on Job Satisfaction among Indian Radiologists - Under-Studied Journey from Promised Land to Paradise Lost
    Sudha Kiran Das, Vikram Patil, Anupama Chandrappa, Sachin Thammegowda, Sachin Prabhakar Shetty, Rudresh Hiremath
    Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences.2021; 10(42): 3633.     CrossRef
  • The Journal Citation Indicator has arrived for Emerging Sources Citation Index journals, including the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, in June 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 20.     CrossRef
  • Why are India’s Best Medical Graduates not Preferring ENT for Postgraduate Training Through NEET-PG?
    Ahmad Ozair, Abhishek Bahadur Singh
    Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery.2020; 72(4): 535.     CrossRef
  • Determining factors for the choice of medical career among the final year medical students of a private university in Nigeria
    AbiodunIdowu Okunlola, OlakunleFatai Babalola, CeciliaKehinde Okunlola, AdedayoIdris Salawu, OlabisiTimothy Adeyemo, IdowuOluwaseyi Adebara
    Nigerian Journal of Medicine.2020; 29(2): 308.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing medical students’ choice of specialization: A gender based systematic review
    Mathieu Levaillant, Lucie Levaillant, Nicolas Lerolle, Benoît Vallet, Jean-François Hamel-Broza
    EClinicalMedicine.2020; 28: 100589.     CrossRef
  • Anticipated decrease in surgeons: does orthopedic internship affect medical students career choice?
    İbrahim Deniz CANBEYLİ, Meriç ÇIRPAR
    Journal of Health Sciences and Medicine.2020; 3(4): 395.     CrossRef
Cultural immersion in the education of healthcare professionals: a systematic review  
Marty J. Brock, Levi B. Fowler, Johnathan G. Freeman, Devan C. Richardson, Lisa J. Barnes
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:4.   Published online January 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.4
  • 29,247 View
  • 434 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
With the ever-changing cultural makeup of society, the ability to deliver culturally appropriate healthcare is essential. An educational method aimed at increasing cultural knowledge and sensitivity in the education of healthcare professionals is cultural immersion, which creates opportunities for transformational learning through direct interactions with culturally diverse populations. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the qualitative effects of cultural immersion experiences on graduate-level healthcare professional students.
Methods
A search of the CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) and ERIC (Education Resources Information Center) databases was performed, utilizing search terms including cultural immersion, cultural sensitivity, educational outcomes, and healthcare professionals. The search was limited to publications within the last 10 years. The articles were screened according to title, abstract, and full-text following the application of inclusion/exclusion criteria. Themes identified within each article were collected and categorized, using a qualitative methodology, into 5 overarching domains to assess the educational experiences. Studies were scored for quality using the qualitative portion of the McGill Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool–2011.
Results
Nine studies incorporating a total of 94 participants with experiences in 14 culturally diverse environments revealing 47 individually identified themes were included in the review. The results indicated that all cultural immersion experiences stimulated increased cultural awareness and sensitivity.
Conclusion
Cultural immersion experiences produced a positive, multi-domain effect on cultural learning in students of the health professions. The results of this review provide support for implementing cultural immersion experiences into the education of healthcare professionals with the goal of increasing cultural sensitivity.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluating the effects of cultural immersion on counselor trainees' multicultural development and intercultural competence: A metasynthesis of qualitative evidence
    Ben C.H. Kuo, Nada Hussein, Nadeen Makhzoum, Pinky Sabhnani, Matthew Zvric
    International Journal of Intercultural Relations.2023; 94: 101798.     CrossRef
  • A Course Sequence as a Model to Teach Cultural Humility to MSW Students
    Pamela A. Viggiani, Elizabeth Russell, Mary Kozub
    Journal of Teaching in Social Work.2023; 43(3): 353.     CrossRef
  • Breaking boundaries and opening borders by clicking into an inclusive virtual simulated learning environment
    Amanda K. Edgar, James A. Armitage, Luke X. Chong, Nadeeka Arambewela-Colley, Anuradha Narayanan
    Education and Information Technologies.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • From the World to Western: A Community-Engaged Teaching Strategy to Enhance Students’ Learning of Cultural Issues Relevant to Healthcare
    Olayide Ogunsiji, Anita Eseosa Ogbeide, Valentine Mukuria, Florence Olugbemiro, Alex Workman, Tinashe Dune
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(9): 5114.     CrossRef
  • HIV Stigma Reduction Interventions Among Health Care Providers and Students in Different Countries: A Systematic Review
    Mona Mohammadifirouzeh, Kyeung Mi Oh, Susan Tanner
    Current HIV Research.2022; 20(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Educating future professionals in perinatal medicine: the attitude of medical and nursing students towards childbirth
    Ernesto González-Mesa, Olga Cazorla-Granados, Marta Blasco-Alonso, Lorena Sabonet, Jesús S. Jiménez-López, Cristóbal Rengel-Díaz
    Journal of Perinatal Medicine.2021; 49(4): 485.     CrossRef
  • Learning objectives of cultural immersion programs: A scoping review
    Kate Buchanan, Marrianne Velandia, Marina Weckend, Sara Bayes
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 100: 104832.     CrossRef
  • Using internationalization-at-home activities to enhance the cultural awareness of health and social science research students: A mixed-method study
    Doris Y. Leung, Christine Kumlien, Melanie Bish, Elisabeth Carlson, Pui Sze Chan, E. Angela Chan
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 100: 104851.     CrossRef
  • An Opportunity to Integrate Cultural Sensitivity Training Into the Doctor of Pharmacy Curriculum
    Anna Haas-Gehres, Ed Portillo, Marlowe Djuric Kachlic, Anita Siu
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2021; 85(7): 8459.     CrossRef
  • Educating for diversity, equity, and inclusion: A review of commonly used educational approaches
    Leonor Corsino, Anthony T. Fuller
    Journal of Clinical and Translational Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fostering cultural responsiveness in physiotherapy: curricula survey of Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand physiotherapy programs
    Maxine Te, Felicity Blackstock, Lucy Chipchase
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Developing a framework for evaluating the impact of Healthcare Improvement Science Education across Europe: a qualitative study  
Manuel Lillo-Crespo, M. Cristina Sierras-Davó, Rhoda MacRae, Kevin Rooney
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:28.   Published online November 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.28
  • 34,092 View
  • 420 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Frontline healthcare professionals are well positioned to improve the systems in which they work. Educational curricula, however, have not always equipped healthcare professionals with the skills or knowledge to implement and evaluate improvements. It is important to have a robust and standardized framework in order to evaluate the impact of such education in terms of improvement, both within and across European countries. The results of such evaluations will enhance the further development and delivery of healthcare improvement science (HIS) education. We aimed to describe the development and piloting of a framework for prospectively evaluating the impact of HIS education and learning.
Methods
The evaluation framework was designed collaboratively and piloted in 7 European countries following a qualitative methodology. The present study used mixed methods to gather data from students and educators. The framework took the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation as a theoretical reference.
Results
The framework was found to be feasible and acceptable for use across differing European higher education contexts according to the pilot study and the participants’ consensus. It can be used effectively to evaluate and develop HIS education across European higher education institutions.
Conclusion
We offer a new evaluation framework to capture the impact of HIS education. The implementation of this tool has the potential to facilitate the continuous development of HIS education.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of cost-effectiveness of single-credit traffic safety course based on Kirkpatrick model: a case study of Iran
    Mina Golestani, Homayoun Sadeghi-bazargani, Sepideh Harzand-Jadidi, Hamid Soori
    BMC Medical Education.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Yemen Advanced Field Epidemiology Training Program: An Impact Evaluation, 2021
    Maeen Abduljalil, Abdulhakeem Al Kohlani, Aisha Jumaan, Abdulwahed Al Serouri
    Epidemiologia.2023; 4(3): 235.     CrossRef
  • How, and under what contexts, do academic–practice partnerships collaborate to implement healthcare improvement education into preregistration nursing curriculums: a realist review protocol
    Lorraine Armstrong, Chris Moir, Peta Taylor
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(10): e077784.     CrossRef
  • Developing the American College of Surgeons Quality Improvement Framework to Evaluate Local Surgical Improvement Efforts
    Clifford Y. Ko, Tejen Shah, Heidi Nelson, Avery B. Nathens
    JAMA Surgery.2022; 157(8): 737.     CrossRef
  • Kirkpatrick Model: Its Limitations as Used in Higher Education Evaluation
    Michael CAHAPAY
    International Journal of Assessment Tools in Education.2021; 8(1): 135.     CrossRef
  • Transforming the Future Healthcare Workforce across Europe through Improvement Science Training: A Qualitative Approach
    Maria Cristina Sierras-Davo, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdu, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(3): 1298.     CrossRef
  • Qualitative evaluation of an educational intervention about healthcare improvement for nursing students
    María Cristina Sierras-Davó, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdú Rodríguez
    Aquichan.2021; 21(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Advanced Field Epidemiology Training Programs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: A Multi-Country Study
    Mohannad Al Nsour, Yousef Khader, Haitham Bashier, Majd Alsoukhni
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The United Kingdom Field Epidemiology Training Programme: meeting programme objectives
    Paola Dey, Jeremy Brown, John Sandars, Yvonne Young, Ruth Ruggles, Samantha Bracebridge
    Eurosurveillance.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mapping the Status of Healthcare Improvement Science through a Narrative Review in Six European Countries
    Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Maria Cristina Sierras-Davó, Alan Taylor, Katrina Ritters, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(22): 4480.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions