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Research articles
Self-care perspective taking and empathy in a student-faculty book club in the United States  
Rebecca Henderson, Melanie Gross Hagen, Zareen Zaidi, Valentina Dunder, Edlira Maska, Ying Nagoshi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:22.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.22
  • 7,634 View
  • 180 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We aimed to study the impact of a combined faculty-student book club on education and medical practice as a part of the informal curriculum at the University of Florida College of Medicine in the United States.
Methods
Sixteen medical students and 7 faculties who participated in the book club were interviewed through phone and recorded. The interview was then transcribed and entered into the qualitative data analysis program QSR NVivo (QSR International, Burlington, MA, USA). The transcripts were reviewed, and thematic codes were developed inductively through collaborative iteration. Based on these preliminary codes, a coding dictionary was developed and applied to all interviews within QSR Nvivo to identify themes.
Results
Four main themes were identified from interviews: The first theme, the importance of literature to the development and maintenance of empathy and perspective-taking, and the second theme, the importance of the book club in promoting mentorship, personal relationships and professional development, were important to both student and faculty participants. The third and fourth themes, the need for the book club as a tool for self-care and the book club serving as a reminder about the world outside of school were discussed by student book club members.
Conclusion
Our study demonstrated that an informal book club has a significant positive impact on self-care, perspective-taking, empathy, and developing a “world outside of school” for medical school students and faculty in the United States. It also helps to foster meaningful relationships between students and faculty.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Student-faculty dialogue: meaningful perspective taking on campus
    Tee R. Tyler
    Social Work With Groups.2024; 47(2): 165.     CrossRef
  • Clubes de lectura: una revisión sistemática internacional de estudios (2010-2022)
    Carmen Álvarez-Álvarez, Julián Pascual Díez
    Literatura: teoría, historia, crítica.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The implementation of a required book club for medical students and faculty
    David B. Ney, Nethra Ankam, Anita Wilson, John Spandorfer
    Medical Education Online.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cultivating critical consciousness through a Global Health Book Club
    Sarah L. Collins, Stuart J. Case, Alexandra K. Rodriguez, Acquel C. Allen, Elizabeth A. Wood
    Frontiers in Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advancing book clubs as non-formal learning to facilitate critical public pedagogy in organizations
    Robin S Grenier, Jamie L Callahan, Kristi Kaeppel, Carole Elliott
    Management Learning.2022; 53(3): 483.     CrossRef
  • Not Just for Patrons: Book Club Participation as Professional Development for Librarians
    Laila M. Brown, Valerie Brett Shaindlin
    The Library Quarterly.2021; 91(4): 420.     CrossRef
  • Medical Students’ Creation of Original Poetry, Comics, and Masks to Explore Professional Identity Formation
    Johanna Shapiro, Juliet McMullin, Gabriella Miotto, Tan Nguyen, Anju Hurria, Minh Anh Nguyen
    Journal of Medical Humanities.2021; 42(4): 603.     CrossRef
Peer-assisted feedback: a successful approach for providing feedback on United States Medical Licensing Exam-style clinical skills exam notes in the United States  
Kira Nagoshi, Zareen Zaidi, Ashleigh Wright, Carolyn Stalvey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:29.   Published online October 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.29
  • 10,080 View
  • 133 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Peer-assisted learning (PAL) promotes the development of communication, facilitates improvements in clinical skills, and is a way to provide feedback to learners. We utilized PAL as a conceptual framework to explore the feasibility of peer-assisted feedback (PAF) to improve note-writing skills without requiring faculty time. The aim was to assess whether PAL was a successful method to provide feedback on the United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE)-style clinical skills exam notes by using student feedback on a survey in the United States.
Methods
The University of Florida College of Medicine administers clinical skills examination (CSEs) that include USMLE-like note-writing. PAL, in which students support the learning of their peers, was utilized as an alternative to faculty feedback. Second-year (MS2) and third-year (MS3) medical students taking CSEs participated in faculty-run note-grading sessions immediately after testing, which included explanations of grading rubrics and the feedback process. Students graded an anonymized peer’s notes. The graded material was then forwarded anonymously to its student author to review. Students were surveyed on their perceived ability to provide feedback and the benefits derived from PAF using a Likert scale (1–6) and open-ended comments during the 2017–2018 academic year.
Results
Students felt generally positively about the activity, with mean scores for items related to educational value of 4.49 for MS2s and 5.11 for MS3s (out of 6). MS3s perceived peer feedback as constructive, felt that evaluating each other’s notes was beneficial, and felt that the exercise would improve their future notes. While still positive, MS2 students gave lower scores than the MS3 students.
Conclusion
PAF was a successful method of providing feedback on student CSE notes, especially for MS3s. MS2s commented that although they learned during the process, they might be more invested in improving their note-writing as they approach their own USMLE exam.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • How Do Learners Receive Feedback on Note Writing? A Scoping Review
    Allison Hansen, Ryan M. Klute, Manajyoti Yadav, Saurabh Bansal, William F. Bond
    Academic Medicine.2024; 99(6): 683.     CrossRef
  • Teaching feedback skills to veterinary students by peer-assisted learning
    Aytaç ÜNSAL ADACA
    Ankara Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi.2023; 70(3): 237.     CrossRef
  • Pedagogic Exploration Into Adapting Automated Writing Evaluation and Peer Review Integrated Feedback Into Large-Sized University Writing Classes
    Wei-Yan Li, Kevin Kau, Yi-Jiun Shiung
    SAGE Open.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Benefits of semiology taught using near-peer tutoring are sustainable
    Benjamin Gripay, Thomas André, Marie De Laval, Brice Peneau, Alexandre Secourgeon, Nicolas Lerolle, Cédric Annweiler, Grégoire Justeau, Laurent Connan, Ludovic Martin, Loïc Bière
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
An innovative resident-driven mortality case review curriculum to teach and drive system-based practice improvements in the United States  
Nila S. Radhakrishnan, Margaret C. Lo, Rohit Bishnoi, Subhankar Samal, Robert Leverence, Eric Rosenberg, Zareen Zaidi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:31.   Published online December 26, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.31
  • 23,978 View
  • 261 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Traditionally, the morbidity and mortality conference (M&MC) is a forum where possible medical errors are discussed. Although M&MCs can facilitate identification of opportunities for systemwide improvements, few studies have described their use for this purpose, particularly in residency training programs. This paper describes the use of M&MC case review as a quality improvement activity that teaches system-based practice and can engage residents in improving systems of care.
Methods
Internal medicine residents at a tertiary care academic medical center reviewed 347 consecutive mortalities from March 2014 to September 2017. The residents used case review worksheets to categorize and track causes of mortality, and then debriefed with a faculty member. Selected cases were then presented at a larger interdepartmental meeting and action items were implemented. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyze the results.
Results
The residents identified a possible diagnostic mismatch at some point from admission to death in 54.5% of cases (n= 189) and a possible need for improved management in 48.0% of cases. Three possible management failure themes were identified, including failure to plan, failure to communicate, and failure to rescue, which accounted for 21.9%, 10.7 %, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Following these reviews, quality improvement initiatives proposed by residents led to system-based changes.
Conclusion
A resident-driven mortality review curriculum can lead to improvements in systems of care. This novel type of curriculum can be used to teach system-based practice. The recruitment of teaching faculty with expertise in quality improvement and mortality case analyses is essential for such a project.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Implementation of Hospital Mortality Reviews: A Systematic Review
    Moritz Sebastian Schönfeld, Martin Härter, Ann Sophie Schröder, Katrin Kokartis, Hans-Jürgen Bartz, Levente Kriston
    Journal of Patient Safety.2024; 20(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • One health system’s morbidity and mortality conference survey: a step on the journey to organizational high reliability
    Steven E. Raper, Patricia G. Sullivan, Lawrence S. Levin
    International Journal of Surgery: Global Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Defining a High-Quality and Effective Morbidity and Mortality Conference
    Brendin R. Beaulieu-Jones, Spencer Wilson, Daniel S. Howard, Gordana Rasic, Ben Rembetski, Erica A. Brotschi, Luise I. Pernar
    JAMA Surgery.2023; 158(12): 1336.     CrossRef
  • Implementation of morbidity and mortality conference in a community hospital NICU and narrative review
    Christina Chan, Christine Pazandak, Dimitrios Angelis
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research Article
Hands in medicine: understanding the impact of competency-based education on the formation of medical students’ identities in the United States  
Catherine Gonsalves, Zareen Zaidi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2016;13:31.   Published online August 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2016.13.31
  • 26,972 View
  • 289 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
There have been critiques that competency training, which defines the roles of a physician by simple, discrete tasks or measurable competencies, can cause students to compartmentalize and focus mainly on being assessed without understanding how the interconnected competencies help shape their role as future physicians. Losing the meaning and interaction of competencies can result in a focus on ‘doing the work of a physician’ rather than identity formation and ‘being a physician.’ This study aims to understand how competency-based education impacts the development of a medical student’s identity. Methods: Three ceramic models representing three core competencies ‘medical knowledge,’ ‘patient care,’ and ‘professionalism’ were used as sensitizing objects, while medical students reflected on the impact of competency-based education on identity formation. Qualitative analysis was used to identify common themes. Results: Students across all four years of medical school related to the ‘professionalism’ competency domain (50%). They reflected that ‘being an empathetic physician’ was the most important competency. Overall, students agreed that competency-based education played a significant role in the formation of their identity. Some students reflected on having difficulty in visualizing the interconnectedness between competencies, while others did not. Students reported that the assessment structure deemphasized ‘professionalism’ as a competency. Conclusion: Students perceive ‘professionalism’ as a competency that impacts their identity formation in the social role of ‘being a doctor,’ albeit a competency they are less likely to be assessed on. High-stakes exams, including the United States Medical Licensing Exam clinical skills exam, promote this perception.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A holistic student-centred guidance framework supports Finnish vocational education and training students in building competence identity
    Anu Raudasoja, Soili Rinne, Sanna Heino
    Nordic Journal of Vocational Education and Training.2024; 14(1): 53.     CrossRef
  • Toward proficiency in telebehavioral health: applying interprofessional competencies in couple and family therapy
    Katherine M. Hertlein, Kenneth P. Drude, Donald M. Hilty, Marlene M. Maheu
    Journal of Marital and Family Therapy.2021; 47(2): 359.     CrossRef
  • The Condensed MFT Core Competencies: A Streamlined Approach for Measuring Student and Supervisee Learning Using the MFT Core Competencies
    William F. Northey, Diane R. Gehart
    Journal of Marital and Family Therapy.2020; 46(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Needs and Preferences of Domestic and Sexual Violence Education for Health Profession Students
    Jessica N. Semin, Alena Skrundevskiy-Coburn, Lynette M. Smith, Shireen S. Rajaram
    Violence Against Women.2020; 26(15-16): 1876.     CrossRef
  • How does medical education affect empathy and compassion in medical students? A meta-ethnography: BEME Guide No. 57
    Charmaine Krishnasamy, Sik Yin Ong, May Eng Loo, Jill Thistlethwaite
    Medical Teacher.2019; 41(11): 1220.     CrossRef
  • Identification and evaluation of the core elements of character education for medical students in Korea
    Yera Hur, Keumho Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 21.     CrossRef
  • Clinical communication skills and professionalism education are required from the beginning of medical training - a point of view of family physicians
    Camila Ament Giuliani dos Santos Franco, Renato Soleiman Franco, José Mauro Ceratti Lopes, Milton Severo, Maria Amélia Ferreira
    BMC Medical Education.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions