Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
2 "S. Bruce Binder"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Brief Reports
How prepared are medical students to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions  
Elizabeth Shanika Esparaz, S. Bruce Binder, Nicole J. Borges
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:29.   Published online November 23, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.29
  • 24,756 View
  • 141 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
It is essential that primary care physicians have a solid fund of knowledge of the diagnosis and management of common eye conditions as well as ocular emergencies, as management of these diseases commonly involves appropriate referral to an ophthalmologist. Thus, it is crucial to receive comprehensive clinical knowledge of ophthalmic disease in the primary care setting during medical school. This study investigated how well prepared medical students are to diagnose and manage common ocular conditions. The study used scores from a standardized 12-question quiz administered to fourth-year medical students (N = 97; 88% response rate) and second-year medical students (N = 97; 97% response rate). The quiz comprising diagnosis and referral management questions covered the most frequently tested ophthalmology topics on board exams and assessed students’ ability to recognize when referral to an ophthalmologist is appropriate. Fourth-year medical students had quiz scores ranging from 0%-94.5% with an average score of 68.7%. Second-year students had quiz scores ranging from 27.2%–86.4%, with an average score of 63.8%. Passing rate was 70%. Student’s t-test showed fourth-year students had a significantly higher quiz average (P = 0.003). In general, both classes performed better on diagnostic questions (fourth-year, 73.7%; second year, 65.8%) rather than on management questions (fourth-year, 64.8%; second year, 61.8%). Both second-year and fourth-year students on average fell short on passing the ophthalmology proficiency quiz, and in general students were more adept at diagnosing rather than managing ocular conditions and emergencies.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Systematic Review of Ophthalmology Education in Medical Schools
    Sascha K.R. Spencer, Patrick A. Ireland, Jorja Braden, Jenny L. Hepschke, Michael Lin, Helen Zhang, Jessie Channell, Hessom Razavi, Angus W. Turner, Minas T. Coroneo, Boaz Shulruf, Ashish Agar
    Ophthalmology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Decline of Basic Ophthalmology in General Medical Education: A Scoping Review and Recommended Potential Solutions
    Jennifer Liao, Robin Redmon Wright, Gargi K Vora
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Matching of advanced undergraduate medical students’ competence profiles with the required competence profiles of their specialty of choice for postgraduate training
    Lea Jebram, Sarah Prediger, Viktor Oubaid, Sigrid Harendza
    BMC Medical Education.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Ophthalmology Teaching and its Impact on the Choice of Future Specialties Among Medical Students of Jazan University
    Ismail Abuallut, Eman Hurissi, Bandar M Abuageelah, Mona Alfaifi, Alshomokh Hakami, Alanoud Qadri, Afnan Hakami, Saleh Ghulaysi
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Medical Schools’ Ophthalmology Course: An Appraisal by Ophthalmology Residents
    Yahya Abdulrahman Al-Najmi, Ahmed Hussein Subki, Nazih Suwalih Alzaidi, Nadeem Shafique Butt, Alaa Abdulhamid Alsammahi, Firas Mohamed Madani, Mohammed Saad Alsallum, Rakan Salah Al-Harbi, Nizar Mohammed Alhibshi
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 8365.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative analysis of medical students’ and physicians’ knowledge of degenerative cervical myelopathy
    Mueez Waqar, Jane Wilcock, Jayne Garner, Benjamin Davies, Mark Kotter
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(1): e028455.     CrossRef
  • Ophthalmology training and competency levels in caring for patients with ophthalmic complaints among United States internal medicine, emergency medicine, and family medicine residents
    Christopher Daniel Gelston, Jennifer Landrigan Patnaik
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 25.     CrossRef
Strengthening student communication through pediatric simulated patient encounters  
Ryan Whitt, Gregory Toussaint, S. Bruce Binder, Nicole J. Borges
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:21.   Published online August 17, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.21
  • 23,431 View
  • 151 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
As medical students enter the role of physician, clinical outcomes not only rely on their mastery of clinical knowledge, but also on the effectiveness in which they can communicate with patients and family members. While students typically have numerous opportunities to practice clinical communication with adult patients, such practice in pediatric settings is limited. This study examines if simulated patient (SP) encounters strengthen third-year medical students’ communication skills during the pediatrics clerkship. During 2011-2013, three SP encounters (comprising 3 pediatric scenarios) were incorporated into a pediatrics clerkship at one United States medical school to give students a safe venue to practice advanced communication with observation and direct feedback. Third-year medical students engaged in the scenarios and received both written and oral feedback from an evaluator observing the encounter. With IRB approval, students’ self-perceived confidence and abilities at performing the advanced communication skills were measured using an eightitem, Likert scale questionnaire administered pre and post the SP encounter. Pre- and post-questionnaires (n = 215; response rate, 96%) analyzed using a Wilcoxon-matched pairs signed-rank test demonstrated statistically significant increases in students’ perception of their confidence and abilities regarding their performance (P < 0.05; Bonferroni correction, P < 0.006). There was an increases in student confidence and self-perceived ability in: first, communicating with children and family members of young patients; second, managing confrontational situations involving parents; third, performing a thorough psychosocial history with an adolescent; and fourth, using Evidence Based Medicine to motivate parents.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A comparative analysis of student, educator, and simulated parent ratings of video-recorded medical student consultations in pediatrics
    Clare C. Sullivan, Daire M. O’Leary, Fiona M. Boland, Claire M. Condron, Claire M. Mulhall, Walter J. Eppich
    Advances in Simulation.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preparing for Pediatrics: Experiential Learning Helps Medical Students Prepare for Their Clinical Placement
    Clare Sullivan, Claire Condron, Claire Mulhall, Mohammad Almulla, Maria Kelly, Daire O'Leary, Walter Eppich
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Improving Patient- and Family-Centered Communication in Pediatrics: A Review of Simulation-Based Learning
    Eleanor Peterson, Rebecca Morgan, Aaron Calhoun
    Pediatric Annals.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • ‘Demystifying’ the encounter with adolescent patients: a qualitative study on medical students’ experiences and perspectives during training with adolescent simulated patients
    Yusuke Leo Takeuchi, Raphaël Bonvin, Anne-Emmanuelle Ambresin
    Medical Education Online.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Student Perception of Preparedness for Clinical Management of Adults With Lifelong Disability Using a Standardized Patient Assessment
    Lisa Dannemiller, Elshimaa Basha, Wendy Kriekels, Amy Nordon-Craft
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2017; 31(4): 76.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions