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Research Article
Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school  
P. Ravi Shankar, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Neelam R. Dwivedi, Vivek Nuguri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:23.   Published online September 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.23
  • 35,241 View
  • 199 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Xavier University School of Medicine adopted an integrated, organ system-based curriculum in January 2013. The present study was aimed at determining students’ perceptions of the integrated curriculum and related assessment methods. Methods: The study was conducted on first- to fourth-semester undergraduate medical students during March 2014. The students were informed of the study and subsequently invited to participate. Focus group discussions were conducted. The curriculum’s level of integration, different courses offered, teaching-learning methods employed, and the advantages and concerns relating to the curriculum were noted. The respondents also provided feedback about the assessment methods used. Deductive content analysis was used to analyze the data. Results: Twenty-two of the 68 students (32.2%) participated in the study. The respondents expressed generally positive opinions. They felt that the curriculum prepared them well for licensing examinations and future practice. Problem-based learning sessions encouraged active learning and group work among students, thus, improving their understanding of the course material. The respondents felt that certain subjects were allocated a larger proportion of time during the sessions, as well as more questions during the integrated assessment. They also expressed an appreciation for medical humanities, and felt that sessions on the appraisal of literature needed modification. Their opinions about assessment of behavior, attitudes, and professionalism varied. Conclusion: Student opinion was positive, overall. Our findings would be of interest to other medical schools that have recently adopted an integrated curriculum or are in the process of doing so.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Adoption of Problem-Based Learning in Medical Schools in Non-Western Countries: A Systematic Review
    See Chai Carol Chan, Anjali Rajendra Gondhalekar, George Choa, Mohammed Ahmed Rashid
    Teaching and Learning in Medicine.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Using generalizability analysis to estimate parameters for anatomy assessments: A multi-institutional study
    Jessica N. Byram, Mark F. Seifert, William S. Brooks, Laura Fraser-Cotlin, Laura E. Thorp, James M. Williams, Adam B. Wilson
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2017; 10(2): 109.     CrossRef
  • Recall of Theoretical Pharmacology Knowledge by 6th Year Medical Students and Interns of Three Medical Schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    A. A. Mustafa, H. A. Alassiry, A. Al-Turki, N. Alamri, N. A. Alhamdan, Abdalla Saeed
    Education Research International.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
  • Designing and conducting a two day orientation program for first semester undergraduate medical students
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 31.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study  
P. Ravi Shankar, Rishi Bharti, Ravi Ramireddy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Vivek Nuguri
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:9.   Published online May 7, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.9
  • 29,204 View
  • 171 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Xavier University School of Medicine admits students mainly from the United States and Canada to the undergraduate medical program. A previous study conducted in June 2013 used the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure to measure the educational environment and impact of different teaching and learning methods in the program. The present study aims to obtain information about students’ perceptions of changes in the educational environment, which underwent modifications in teaching and learning, in January 2014. Information was collected about the participants’ semester of study, gender, nationality, and age. Students’ perceptions of the educational environment were documented by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 50 statements grouped into five categories. Average scores were compared among different groups. The mean total and category scores were compared to those of the 2013 study. Sixty of the sixty-nine students (86.9%) who enrolled in the undergraduate medical program participated in the survey. The majority were male, aged 20¬–¬25 years, and of American nationality. The mean±SD total score was 151.32±18.3. The mean scores for students’ perception in the survey categories were perception of teaching/learning (38.45), perception of teachers (33.90), academic self-perceptions (22.95), perception of atmosphere (36.32), and social self-perception (19.70). There were no significant differences in these scores among the different groups. All scores except those for academic self-perception were significantly higher in the present study compared to the previous one (P < 0.05). The above results will be of particular interest to schools that plan to transition to an integrated curriculum.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characterization of the learning environment of an Internal Medicine course for medical students of ICESI University of Cali, Colombia
    Janer Varón Arenas, Henry Arley Taquez Quenguan, Nathalia Salazar Falla, Diana Salazar Ulloa
    Educación Médica.2021; 22: 486.     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Mentoring Environment Through Thematic Analysis of the Learning Environment in Medical Education: a Systematic Review
    Jia Min Hee, Hong Wei Yap, Zheng Xuan Ong, Simone Qian Min Quek, Ying Pin Toh, Stephen Mason, Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019; 34(10): 2190.     CrossRef
  • Developing and validating a tool for measuring the educational environment in clinical anesthesia
    Navdeep S. Sidhu, Eleri Clissold
    Canadian Journal of Anesthesia/Journal canadien d'anesthésie.2018; 65(11): 1228.     CrossRef
  • Challenges in shifting to an integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 9.     CrossRef
  • Initiating small group learning in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 10.     CrossRef
  • Reassessing the educational environment among undergraduate students in a chiropractic training institution: A study over time
    Per J. Palmgren, Tobias Sundberg, Klara Bolander Laksov
    Journal of Chiropractic Education.2015; 29(2): 110.     CrossRef
  • Student feedback about the integrated curriculum in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Neelam R. Dwivedi, Vivek Nuguri
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 23.     CrossRef
  • Designing and conducting a two day orientation program for first semester undergraduate medical students
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 31.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Small group effectiveness in a Caribbean medical school’s problem-based learning sessions  
P Ravi Shankar, Atanu Nandy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Soumitra Chakravarty
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:5.   Published online March 24, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.5
  • 65,535 View
  • 183 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The tutorial group effectiveness instrument was developed to provide objective information on the effectiveness of small groups. Student perception of small group effectiveness during the PBL process has not been previously studied in Xavier University School of Medicine. Hence the present study was carried out.
Methods
The study was conducted among the second and third semester undergraduate medical students during the last week of September 2013, in Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba, Kingdom of the Netherlands. Students were informed about the objectives of the study and invited to participate after obtaining written, informed consent. Demographic information like gender, age, nationality and whether the respondent had been exposed to PBL before joining the institution were noted. Student perception about small group effectiveness was studied by noting their degree of agreement with a set of 19 statements using a Likert type scale.
Results
Thirty four of the 37 (91.9%) second and third semester medical students participated in the study. The mean cognitive score was 3.76 while the mean motivational and demotivational scores were 3.65 and 2.51 respectively. The median cognitive category score was 27 (maximum score 35) while the motivation score was 26 (maximum score 35) and the demotivational score was 12 (maximum being 25). There was no significant difference in scores according to respondents’ demographic characteristics.
Conclusion
Student perception about small group effectiveness was positive. Since most medical schools all over the world already have or are introducing PBL as a learning modality, Tutorial Group Effectiveness Instrument can provide valuable information about small group functioning during PBL sessions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Should the PBL tutor be present? A cross-sectional study of group effectiveness in synchronous and asynchronous settings
    Samuel Edelbring, Siw Alehagen, Evalotte Mörelius, AnnaKarin Johansson, Patrik Rytterström
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Initiating small group learning in a Caribbean medical school
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 10.     CrossRef
  • Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas na Graduação Médica – Uma Revisão da Literatura Atual
    Luciana Brosina de Leon, Fernanda de Quadros Onófrio
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2015; 39(4): 614.     CrossRef
  • Assessing the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning of Preventive Medicine Education in China
    Xiaojie Ding, Liping Zhao, Haiyan Chu, Na Tong, Chunhui Ni, Zhibin Hu, Zhengdong Zhang, Meilin Wang
    Scientific Reports.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba  
P. Ravi Shankar, Arun K Dubey, Ramanan Balasubramanium
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:8.   Published online September 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.8
  • 47,091 View
  • 210 Download
  • 9 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical Students’ Perception of the Educational Environment at College of Medicine: A Prospective Study with a Review of Literature
    Syed Sameer Aga, Muhammad Anwar Khan, Mansour Al Qurashi, Bader Khawaji, Mubarak Al-Mansour, Syed Waqas Shah, Amir Abushouk, Hassan Abdullah Alabdali, Ahmed Sultan Alharbi, Mishal Essam Hawsawi, Osama Ali Alzharani, Ehsan Namaziandost
    Education Research International.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Use of Clinical PBL in Primary Care in Undergraduate Medical Schools
    Gustavo Salata Romão, Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti, Lucélio Bernardes Couto
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Aplicação do PBL Clínico na Atenção Primária em Cursos de Medicina
    Gustavo Salata Romão, Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti, Lucélio Bernardes Couto
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Médica.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Understanding the Mentoring Environment Through Thematic Analysis of the Learning Environment in Medical Education: a Systematic Review
    Jia Min Hee, Hong Wei Yap, Zheng Xuan Ong, Simone Qian Min Quek, Ying Pin Toh, Stephen Mason, Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2019; 34(10): 2190.     CrossRef
  • ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION ABOUT EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE IN KERALA
    Paul Daniel, Celine Thalappillil Mathew
    Journal of Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare.2017; 4(51): 3103.     CrossRef
  • Development of an instrument to measure medical students’ perceptions of the assessment environment: initial validation
    Joong Hiong Sim, Wen Ting Tong, Wei-Han Hong, Jamuna Vadivelu, Hamimah Hassan
    Medical Education Online.2015; 20(1): 28612.     CrossRef
  • Veterinary students’ perceptions of their learning environment as measured by the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure
    Jacquelyn M Pelzer, Jennifer L Hodgson, Stephen R Werre
    BMC Research Notes.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Designing and conducting a two day orientation program for first semester undergraduate medical students
    P. Ravi Shankar
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 31.     CrossRef
  • Students’ perception of the learning environment at Xavier University School of Medicine, Aruba: a follow-up study
    P. Ravi Shankar, Rishi Bharti, Ravi Ramireddy, Ramanan Balasubramanium, Vivek Nuguri
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2014; 11: 9.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions