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Volume 9; 2012
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Technical Report
North Korean defectors seeking health certification to take the national medical licensing examination in the Republic of Korea: figures and procedures
Yoon Hee Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:12.   Published online December 1, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.12
  • 46,537 View
  • 165 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In May 2011, the Ministry of Unification of the Republic of Korea (Korea) announced that 21,165 defectors from Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) had settled in Korea. Since healthcare workers are counted among these defectors, it is necessary to provide them with a pathway to certification to work in Korea. This report summarizes the vetting and approval process defectors from North Korea must pass through to be eligible to take the national medical licensing examination. Defectors must pass an oral test conducted by the National Health Personnel Licensing Examination Board to be eligible to sit for the exam. From 2002 to August 2011, 41 North Korean defectors applied for the approval process to take the exam. Twenty-nine were approved (70.7%): 23 physicians, 1 dentist, 2 oriental medical doctor, 1 nurse, and 2 pharmacists. Out of 29 approved, 11 passed the licensing examination (39.3%). This report also highlights the difficulty in assessing North Korean defectors' eligibility by oral test, and suggests that adequate competency should be emphasized to recognize their unique abilities as healthcare personnel.

Citations

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  • Challenges Experienced By North Korean Refugee Doctors in Acquiring a Medical License in South Korea: A Qualitative Analysis
    Shin Ha, Hui Ran Choi, Jong Koo Lee, Yo Han Lee
    Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions.2019; 39(2): 112.     CrossRef
  • Exploration of examinees’ traits that affect the score of Korean Medical Licensing Examination
    Mi Kyoung Yim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 5.     CrossRef
  • Plan on establishment of post-unification North Korean medical safety net
    Young-Jeon Shin
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(5): 394.     CrossRef
  • Can a medical regulatory system be implemented in Korea?
    Sun Huh, Myung-Hyun Chung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 158.     CrossRef
  • The integration process of North Korean defector physicians into the South Korean medical system
    Jae-Phil Choi
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(5): 383.     CrossRef
Research Articles
Strengthening the admissions process in health care professional education: focus on a premier Pacific Island medical college
Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Mercy Okwudili Ezeala, Niraj Swami
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:11.   Published online November 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.11
  • 29,220 View
  • 149 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Relying solely on measures of intellectual aptitude and academic performance in university admissions can be disadvantageous to underprivileged students. The Fiji School of Medicine primarily uses such measures to evaluate and select student applicants, and the introduction of supplementary assessments could provide better access for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This study examined the need for supplementary assessments in the admission process, types of additional assessments needed, and stakeholders??views on a multi-entry multi-exit strategy currently in use at the Fiji School of Medicine. A survey of the key stakeholders was conducted in February and March 2012 using closed and open ended questionnaire. One hundred and twenty-two validated questionnaires were self-administered by key stakeholders from the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences (CMNHS) and Fiji Ministries of Education and Health, with a response rate of 61%. Returned questionnaires were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Sixty-five percent of respondents supported the introduction of supplementary assessments, 49% favoured admissions test, and 16% preferred assessing non-academic factors. Many respondents supported the School?占퐏 multi-entry multi-exit strategy as a ?占퐂ood policy??that provided ?占퐀lexibility??and opportunity for students, but should be better regulated. These findings demonstrate the need for supplementary assessments in the selection process and for continued support for the use of multi-entry multi-exit strategy at the school.

Citations

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  • Identification of the components for investigation of the psychological strength of nursing applicants: A qualitative study
    Farzaneh Bagheriyeh, Akram Ghahramanian, Leila Valizadeh, Vahid Zamanzadeh, Geoffrey Dickens
    Nursing Open.2022; 9(6): 2618.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of admission criteria and selection methods in nursing education
    Vahid Zamanzadeh, Akram Ghahramanian, Leila Valizadeh, Farzaneh Bagheriyeh, Marita Lynagh
    BMC Nursing.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The New Era of : What Should Be Prepared to Be a Top Journal in the Category of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility.2013; 19(4): 419.     CrossRef
Improved quality and quantity of written feedback is associated with a structured feedback proforma
Philip M. Newton, Melisa J. Wallace, Judy McKimm
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:10.   Published online August 13, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.10
  • 41,788 View
  • 186 Download
  • 16 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Facilitating the provision of detailed, deep and useful feedback is an important design feature of any educational programme. Here we evaluate feedback provided to medical students completing short transferable skills projects. Feedback quantity and depth were evaluated before and after a simple intervention to change the structure of the feedback-provision form from a blank free-text feedback form to a structured proforma that asked a pair of short questions for each of the six domains being assessed. Each pair of questions consisted of asking the marker ?占퐓hat was done well???and ?占퐓hat changes would improve the assignment???Changing the form was associated with a significant increase in the quantity of the feedback and in the amount and quality of feedback provided to students. We also observed that, for these double-marked projects, the marker designated as ?占퐉arker 1??consistently wrote more feedback than the marker designated ?占퐉arker 2??

Citations

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  • How an EPA-based curriculum supports professional identity formation
    Anne E. Bremer, Marjolein H. J. van de Pol, Roland F. J. M. Laan, Cornelia R. M. G. Fluit
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and evaluation of two interventions to improve students’ reflection on feedback
    Richard Harris, Pam Blundell-Birtill, Madeleine Pownall
    Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Enhancing written feedback: The use of a cover sheet influences feedback quality
    J.G. Arts, M. Jaspers, D. Joosten-ten Brinke, Sammy King Fai Hui
    Cogent Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Implementation of written structured feedback into a surgical OSCE
    J. Sterz, S. Linßen, M. C. Stefanescu, T. Schreckenbach, L. B. Seifert, M. Ruesseler
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Eliciting student feedback for course development: the application of a qualitative course evaluation tool among business research students
    Carly Steyn, Clint Davies, Adeel Sambo
    Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education.2019; 44(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Diş Hekimliği Eğitiminde Beceri ve Yeterliğin Değerlendirilmesi II: Değerlendirme Yöntemleri
    Kadriye Funda Akaltan
    Selcuk Dental Journal.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of individual structured and qualified feedback on improving clinical performance of dental students in clinical courses-randomised controlled study
    I. M. Schüler, R. Heinrich-Weltzien, M. Eiselt
    European Journal of Dental Education.2018; 22(3): e458.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of High-Frequency, Structured Expert Feedback on the Learning Curves of Basic Interventional Ultrasound Skills Applied to Regional Anesthesia
    Getúlio Rodrigues de Oliveira Filho, Francisco de Assis Caire Mettrau
    Anesthesia & Analgesia.2018; 126(3): 1028.     CrossRef
  • A case study on written comments as a form of feedback in teacher education: so much to gain
    Jorik Gerardus Arts, Mieke Jaspers, Desiree Joosten-ten Brinke
    European Journal of Teacher Education.2016; 39(2): 159.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece
    Panteleimon Pantelidis, Nikolaos Staikoglou, Georgios Paparoidamis, Christos Drosos, Stefanos Karamaroudis, Athina Samara, Christodoulos Keskinis, Michail Sideris, George Giannakoulas, Georgios Tsoulfas, Asterios Karagiannis
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2016; 13: 13.     CrossRef
  • The effect of written standardized feedback on the structure and quality of surgical lectures: A prospective cohort study
    Jasmina Sterz, Sebastian H. Höfer, Bernd Bender, Maren Janko, Farzin Adili, Miriam Ruesseler
    BMC Medical Education.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Group Peer Teaching: A Strategy for Building Confidence in Communication and Teamwork Skills in Physical Therapy Students
    Christopher Seenan, Sivaramkumar Shanmugam, Jennie Stewart
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2016; 30(3): 40.     CrossRef
  • Does Reflective Learning with Feedback Improve Dental Students’ Self-Perceived Competence in Clinical Preparedness?
    Jung-Joon Ihm, Deog-Gyu Seo
    Journal of Dental Education.2016; 80(2): 173.     CrossRef
  • Encouraging formative assessments of leadership for foundation doctors
    Lindsay Hadley, David Black, Jan Welch, Peter Reynolds, Clare Penlington
    The Clinical Teacher.2015; 12(4): 231.     CrossRef
  • Use of the ‘Stop, Start, Continue’ method is associated with the production of constructive qualitative feedback by students in higher education
    Alice Hoon, Emily Oliver, Kasia Szpakowska, Philip Newton
    Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education.2015; 40(5): 755.     CrossRef
  • The New Era of : What Should Be Prepared to Be a Top Journal in the Category of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility.2013; 19(4): 419.     CrossRef
Brief Reports
An objective structured biostatistics examination: a pilot study based on computer-assisted evaluation for undergraduates
Abdul Sattar Khan, Hamit Acemoglu, Zekeriya Akturk
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:9.   Published online July 17, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.9
  • 25,850 View
  • 158 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
We designed and evaluated an objective structured biostatistics examination (OSBE) on a trial basis to determine whether it was feasible for formative or summative assessment. At Ataturk University, we have a seminar system for curriculum for every cohort of all five years undergraduate education. Each seminar consists of an integrated system for different subjects, every year three to six seminars that meet for six to eight weeks, and at the end of each seminar term we conduct an examination as a formative assessment. In 2010, 201 students took the OSBE, and in 2011, 211 students took the same examination at the end of a seminar that had biostatistics as one module. The examination was conducted in four groups and we examined two groups together. Each group had to complete 5 stations in each row therefore we had two parallel lines with different instructions to be followed, thus we simultaneously examined 10 students in these two parallel lines. The students were invited after the examination to receive feedback from the examiners and provide their reflections. There was a significant (P= 0.004) difference between male and female scores in the 2010 students, but no gender difference was found in 2011. The comparison among the parallel lines and among the four groups showed that two groups, A and B, did not show a significant difference (P> 0.05) in either class. Nonetheless, among the four groups, there was a significant difference in both 2010 (P= 0.001) and 2011 (P= 0.001). The inter-rater reliability coefficient was 0.60. Overall, the students were satisfied with the testing method; however, they felt some stress. The overall experience of the OSBE was useful in terms of learning, as well as for assessment.

Citations

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  • THE COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES USED IN PHYSIOLOGY PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT
    Ksh. Lakshmikumari, Sarada N, Lalit Kumar L
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH.2022; : 7.     CrossRef
Potential advantage of student-run clinics for diversifying a medical school class
Chris N. Gu, Jane A. McElroy, Blake C. Corcoran
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:8.   Published online May 25, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.8
  • 30,462 View
  • 137 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a student-run clinic on the diversification of a medical student class. We distributed a two-page, 20-item, paper survey to students of the University of Missouri School of Medicine (MU SOM) class of 2015 in July of 2011. The survey gathered information on general demographics, opinions on the importance of medical education opportunities, and opinions on the importance of medical school characteristics in applying to and attending MU SOM. A total of 104 students responded to the survey. A majority of the students identified the MedZou Community Health Clinic, a student-run, free health clinic affiliated with MU SOM, and simulated-patient encounters as important educational experiences (81% and 94%, respectively). More than half of the self-identified non-white??students reported MedZou as an important factor in their choice to apply to (60%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 32 to 88) and attend (71%; 95% CI, 44 to 98) MU SOM, over half of the females reported MedZou as important in their choice to apply (59%; 95% CI, 43 to 76) and attend (57%; 95% CI, 40 to 74), and over half of non-Missouri residents reported MedZou as important in their choice to apply (64%; 95% CI, 36 to 93) and attend (71%; 95% CI, 44 to 98). According to the above results, it can be said that students clearly value both MedZou and simulated-patient encounters as important educational experiences. Women, minorities, and non-Missouri residents value MedZou more highly than their peers who are First Year Medical Students who are Missouri residents, suggesting that MedZou may provide a promising opportunity to advance diversity within MU SOM. These results highlight the need for additional research to further explore MedZou?占퐏 potential to enhance the recruitment of a diverse medical student class.

Citations

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  • College competitiveness and medical school exam performance
    Joshua Levy, Hiba Kausar, Deepal Patel, Shaun Andersen, Edward Simanton
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Learning in student-run clinics: a systematic review
    Tim Schutte, Jelle Tichelaar, Ramon S Dekker, Michiel A van Agtmael, Theo P G M de Vries, Milan C Richir
    Medical Education.2015; 49(3): 249.     CrossRef
  • The role of prehealth student volunteers at a student-run free clinic in New York, United States
    Syed H. Shabbir, Maria Teresa M. Santos
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2015; 12: 49.     CrossRef
  • Peer-supported learning during ‘Health Mela’
    Lucy Cornthwaite, James Humphreys, Romesh Gupta, Satyan Rajbhandari
    The Clinical Teacher.2013; 10(5): 296.     CrossRef
  • Innovative Approaches to Promote a Culturally Competent, Diverse Health Care Workforce in an Institution Serving Hispanic Students
    Suad Ghaddar, John Ronnau, Shawn P. Saladin, Glenn Martínez
    Academic Medicine.2013; 88(12): 1870.     CrossRef
Research Article
Breadth of knowledge vs. grades: What best predicts achievement in the first year of health sciences programmes?
Boaz Shulruf, Meisong Li, Judy McKimm, Melinda Smith
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:7.   Published online May 16, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.7
  • 33,697 View
  • 158 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study aimed to identify those features within secondary school curricula and assessment, particularly science subjects that best predict academic achievement in the first year of three different three-year undergraduate health professional programmes (nursing, pharmacy, and health sciences) at a large New Zealand university. In particular, this study compared the contribution of breadth of knowledge (number of credits acquired) versus grade level (grade point average) and explored the impact of demographic variables on achievement. The findings indicated that grades are the most important factor predicting student success in the first year of university. Although taking biology and physics at secondary school has some impact on university first year achievement, the effect is relatively minor.

Citations

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  • Predictive validity of multiple mini interview scores for future academic and clinical placement performance in physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy programmes
    Swati Kale, Meghana Wadnerkar Kamble, Nicola Spalding
    International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.2020; 27(4): 1.     CrossRef
  • Quantitative analysis of a Māori and Pacific admission process on first-year health study
    Elana Curtis, Erena Wikaire, Yannan Jiang, Louise McMillan, Robert Loto, Airini, Papaarangi Reid
    BMC Medical Education.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief Report
Importance of social pharmacy education in Libyan pharmacy schools: perspectives from pharmacy practitioners
Omar Saad Saleh Abrika, Mohammed Azmi Hassali, Abduelmula R Abduelkarem
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:6.   Published online March 14, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.6
  • 27,948 View
  • 156 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The present study aims to explore the perceptions among pharmacy practitioners in Libya on the importance of social pharmacy education. A qualitative methodology was employed to conduct this study. Using a purposive sampling technique, a total of ten Libyan registered pharmacists were interviewed. Based on the content analysis of the interviews, two major themes emerged, namely the understanding of social pharmacy education and the need for incorporating social pharmacy courses into the pharmacy education curriculum. The majority of the respondents knew about the concept. Of those that had no prior knowledge of this term, half of them expressed interest in knowing more about it. There was a positive perception of introducing social pharmacy into the undergraduate curricula among the respondents, and they believed that it is necessary for future pharmacists to know about social pharmacy components. The findings from the pharmacy practitioners??evaluation suggest the need to incorporate social pharmacy courses into the curricula of all pharmacy schools in Libya.

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  • Competency-based pharmacy education in the Eastern Mediterranean Region—A scoping review
    Dalia Bajis, Betty Chaar, Jonathan Penm, Rebekah Moles
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2016; 8(3): 401.     CrossRef
  • Extending the Role of Pharmacists in Patient Care: Are Pharmacists in Developing Nations Ready to Change?
    Abduelmula R. Abduelkarem
    Pharmacology & Pharmacy.2014; 05(09): 865.     CrossRef
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    Fadi M. Alkhateeb, David A. Latif, Rachel Adkins
    SSRN Electronic Journal.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
Opinion
Revision of subjects of the Korean Optometrist Licensing Examination suggested by optometrists
Won Jin Lee, Sung Soo Kang, Ok-Jin Lee, Sang-Chul Park, Seung-Won Lee, Young-Ki Jeon
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:5.   Published online March 14, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.5
  • 26,913 View
  • 140 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Can a medical regulatory system be implemented in Korea?
    Sun Huh, Myung-Hyun Chung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 158.     CrossRef
Response
Self-financing students in private medical schools
P. Ravi Shankar
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:4.   Published online January 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.4
  • 26,671 View
  • 155 Download
PDF
Letter to Editor
Equity or equality in medical education
Abdul Sattar Khan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:3.   Published online January 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.3
  • 25,637 View
  • 161 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An Investigation into English Language Teaching Textbooks Used at Medical Sciences Universities: Implications for Educational Justice
    Iman Alizadeh, Fatemeh shafaee
    International Journal of Research in English Education.2021; 6(1): 94.     CrossRef
Research Article
A job analysis of care helpers
Su Jin Shin, Kyung-Sook Choi, Seungeun Jeong, Seulgee Kim, Hyeung-Keun Park, Jae Eun Seok
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:2.   Published online January 10, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.2
  • 46,409 View
  • 156 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The aim of this study was to examine the roles of care helpers through job analysis. To do this, this study used the Developing A Curriculum Method (DACUM) to classify job content and a multi-dimensional study design was applied to identify roles and create a job description by looking into the appropriateness, significance, frequency, and difficulty of job content as identified through workshops and cross-sectional surveys conducted for appropriateness verification. A total of 418 care helpers working in nursing facilities and community senior service facilities across the country were surveyed. The collected data were analyzed using PASW 18.0 software. Six duties and 18 tasks were identified based on the job model. Most tasks were found to be ?占퐄mportant task?? scoring 4.0 points or above. Physical care duties, elimination care, position changing and movement assistance, feeding assistance, and safety care were identified as high frequency tasks. The most difficult tasks were emergency prevention, early detection, and speedy reporting. A summary of the job of care helpers is providing physical, emotional, housekeeping, and daily activity assistance to elderly patients with problems in independently undertaking daily activities due to physical or mental causes in long-term care facilities or at the client?占퐏 home. The results of this study suggest a task-focused examination, optimizing the content of the current standard teaching materials authorized by the Ministry of Health and Welfare while supplementing some content which was identified as task elements but not included in the current teaching materials and fully reflecting the actual frequency and difficulty of tasks.

Citations

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  • Can a medical regulatory system be implemented in Korea?
    Sun Huh, Myung-Hyun Chung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 158.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Frequency and Difficulty of Care Helper Jobs in Long Term Care Facilities and Client Homes
    Eun-Hee Hwang, Duk-Yoo Jung, Mi-Jung Kim, Kon-Hee Kim, Su-Jin Shin
    Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing.2012; 26(1): 101.     CrossRef
  • Job Analysis of Clinical Research Coordinators Using the DACUM Process
    Hyun-Sook Kang, Haeng-Mi Son, Nan-Young Lim, Kyung-Sook Cho, Sung-Bok Kwon, Yeo-Jin Yi, Young-Sook Park, Eun-Hee Lee, Joo-Hyun Kim, Hye-Ja Han, Jung-Mi Baik, Younhee Jeong
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2012; 42(7): 1027.     CrossRef
Editorial
President's address: 20 years of perspiration and 20 years of admiration
Kun Sang Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:1.   Published online January 3, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.1
  • 41,385 View
  • 111 Download
  • 4 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Presidential address: Adoption of a clinical skills examination for dental licensing, implementation of computer-based testing for the medical licensing examination, and the 30th anniversary of the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute
    Yoon-Seong Lee
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 1.     CrossRef
  • How far hasThe Korean Journal of Internal Medicineadvanced in terms of journal metrics?
    Sun Huh
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2013; 28(6): 635.     CrossRef
  • The integration process of North Korean defector physicians into the South Korean medical system
    Jae-Phil Choi
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(5): 383.     CrossRef
  • Can a medical regulatory system be implemented in Korea?
    Sun Huh, Myung-Hyun Chung
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 158.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions