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Volume 18; 2021
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Editorial
Training in lung cancer surgery through the metaverse, including extended reality, in the smart operating room of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Korea
Huilyung Koo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:33.   Published online December 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.33
  • 4,629 View
  • 259 Download
  • 14 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse in Cardiovascular Medicine: Applications, Challenges, and the Role of Non-Fungible Tokens
    Ioannis Skalidis, Olivier Muller, Stephane Fournier
    Canadian Journal of Cardiology.2022; 38(9): 1467.     CrossRef
  • CardioVerse: The cardiovascular medicine in the era of Metaverse
    Ioannis Skalidis, Olivier Muller, Stephane Fournier
    Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Metaverse phenomenon and its impact on health: A scoping review
    Ali Garavand, Nasim Aslani
    Informatics in Medicine Unlocked.2022; 32: 101029.     CrossRef
  • Provision of surgical pre-operative patient counseling services through the Metaverse technology
    Anusha Anwer, Yumna Jamil, Maham Bilal
    International Journal of Surgery.2022; 104: 106792.     CrossRef
  • Evolution of Medical Conferences for Congenital Heart Disease Imagers in the Era of COVID-19: From Onsite to Virtual Meetings
    I-Chen Tsai, Hyun Woo Goo, Haifa Abdul Latiff, Seon Young Goo, Sang Joon Park
    Cardiovascular Imaging Asia.2022; 6(3): 82.     CrossRef
  • Gastroenterology in the Metaverse: The dawn of a new era?
    Chi Zhang, Shuyan Feng, Ruonan He, Yi Fang, Shuo Zhang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse: A New Challenge for the Healthcare System: A Scoping Review
    Luca Petrigna, Giuseppe Musumeci
    Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology.2022; 7(3): 63.     CrossRef
  • Who really needs a Metaverse in anatomy education? A review with preliminary survey results
    Joe Iwanaga, Edward C. Muo, Yoko Tabira, Koichi Watanabe, Susan J. Tubbs, Anthony V. D'Antoni, Mathangi Rajaram‐Gilkes, Marios Loukas, Mohammed K. Khalil, R. Shane Tubbs
    Clinical Anatomy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The metaverse in education: Definition, framework, features, potential applications, challenges, and future research topics
    Xinli Zhang, Yuchen Chen, Lailin Hu, Youmei Wang
    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel pathway regarding good cosmetics brands by NFT in the metaverse world
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Virtual hospitals and digital doctors: how far are we from the CardioVerse?
    Ioannis Skalidis, Stephane Fournier, Emmanouil Skalidis, Niccolo Maurizi
    European Heart Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in Metaverse Investigation: Streams of Research and Future Agenda
    Mariapina Trunfio, Simona Rossi
    Virtual Worlds.2022; 1(2): 103.     CrossRef
  • Dynamics of Metaverse and Medicine: A Review Article
    Mrudul A Kawarase, Ashish Anjankar
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Reviews
Educational applications of metaverse: possibilities and limitations  
Bokyung Kye, Nara Han, Eunji Kim, Yeonjeong Park, Soyoung Jo
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:32.   Published online December 13, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.32
  • 16,983 View
  • 1,572 Download
  • 50 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This review aims to define the 4 types of the metaverse and to explain the potential and limitations of its educational applications. The metaverse roadmap categorizes the metaverse into 4 types: augmented reality, lifelogging, mirror world, and virtual reality. An example of the application of augmented reality in medical education would be an augmented reality T-shirt that allows students to examine the inside of the human body as an anatomy lab. Furthermore, a research team in a hospital in Seoul developed a spinal surgery platform that applied augmented reality technology. The potential of the metaverse as a new educational environment is suggested to be as follows: a space for new social communication; a higher degree of freedom to create and share; and the provision of new experiences and high immersion through virtualization. Some of its limitations may be weaker social connections and the possibility of privacy impingement; the commission of various crimes due to the virtual space and anonymity of the metaverse; and maladaptation to the real world for students whose identity has not been established. The metaverse is predicted to change our daily life and economy beyond the realm of games and entertainment. The metaverse has infinite potential as a new social communication space. The following future tasks are suggested for the educational use of the metaverse: first, teachers should carefully analyze how students understand the metaverse; second, teachers should design classes for students to solve problems or perform projects cooperatively and creatively; third, educational metaverse platforms should be developed that prevent misuse of student data.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse—An Alternative Education Space
    Sharon Mistretta
    AI, Computer Science and Robotics Technology.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse in Cardiovascular Medicine: Applications, Challenges, and the Role of Non-Fungible Tokens
    Ioannis Skalidis, Olivier Muller, Stephane Fournier
    Canadian Journal of Cardiology.2022; 38(9): 1467.     CrossRef
  • UTAUT in Metaverse: An “Ifland” Case
    Un-Kon Lee, Hyekyung Kim
    Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research.2022; 17(2): 613.     CrossRef
  • Sağlık Hizmetlerinin Geleceğinde Metaverse Ekosistemi ve Teknolojileri: Uygulamalar, Fırsatlar ve Zorluklar
    Faruk YILMAZ, Anı Hande METE, Buse FİDAN TÜRKÖN, Özgür İNCE
    Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of Technology in Medical Education: SWOC Analysis
    Shruti Jha
    SBV Journal of Basic, Clinical and Applied Health Science.2022; 5(1): 19.     CrossRef
  • CardioVerse: The cardiovascular medicine in the era of Metaverse
    Ioannis Skalidis, Olivier Muller, Stephane Fournier
    Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Definition, roles, and potential research issues of the metaverse in education: An artificial intelligence perspective
    Gwo-Jen Hwang, Shu-Yun Chien
    Computers and Education: Artificial Intelligence.2022; 3: 100082.     CrossRef
  • METAVERSE IN THE CONTEXT OF EDUCATION
    Ahmet GÖÇEN
    Uluslararası Batı Karadeniz Sosyal ve Beşeri Bilimler Dergisi.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • METAVERSE VE SAĞLIK HİZMETLERİ ÜZERİNE BİR DEĞERLENDİRME
    Ferhat Onur AĞAOĞLU, Lokman Onur EKİNCİ, Nurperihan TOSUN
    Erzincan Binali Yıldırım Üniversitesi İktisadi ve İdari Bilimler Fakültesi Dergisi.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Is Metaverse in education a blessing or a curse: a combined content and bibliometric analysis
    Ahmed Tlili, Ronghuai Huang, Boulus Shehata, Dejian Liu, Jialu Zhao, Ahmed Hosny Saleh Metwally, Huanhuan Wang, Mouna Denden, Aras Bozkurt, Lik-Hang Lee, Dogus Beyoglu, Fahriye Altinay, Ramesh C. Sharma, Zehra Altinay, Zhisheng Li, Jiahao Liu, Faizan Ahma
    Smart Learning Environments.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • CardioVerse: Buying the stairway to heaven
    Antonio Sánchez-Puente, P. Ignacio Dorado-Díaz, Pedro L Sánchez
    Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse as a Virtual Form of Smart Cities: Opportunities and Challenges for Environmental, Economic, and Social Sustainability in Urban Futures
    Zaheer Allam, Ayyoob Sharifi, Simon Elias Bibri, David Sydney Jones, John Krogstie
    Smart Cities.2022; 5(3): 771.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse phenomenon and its impact on health: A scoping review
    Ali Garavand, Nasim Aslani
    Informatics in Medicine Unlocked.2022; 32: 101029.     CrossRef
  • A novel brain-controlled wheelchair combined with computer vision and augmented reality
    Kaixuan Liu, Yang Yu, Yadong Liu, Jingsheng Tang, Xinbin Liang, Xingxing Chu, Zongtan Zhou
    BioMedical Engineering OnLine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of metaverse in emergency medicine
    Tzu-Chi Wu, Chien-Ta Bruce Ho
    Australasian Emergency Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of Serious Games in Improving Memory Among Older Adults With Cognitive Impairment: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
    Alaa Abd-alrazaq, Dari Alhuwail, Eiman Al-Jafar, Arfan Ahmed, Farag Shuweihdi, Shuja Mohd Reagu, Mowafa Househ
    JMIR Serious Games.2022; 10(3): e35202.     CrossRef
  • Evolution of Medical Conferences for Congenital Heart Disease Imagers in the Era of COVID-19: From Onsite to Virtual Meetings
    I-Chen Tsai, Hyun Woo Goo, Haifa Abdul Latiff, Seon Young Goo, Sang Joon Park
    Cardiovascular Imaging Asia.2022; 6(3): 82.     CrossRef
  • Future era of techno-economic analysis: Insights from review
    Slyvester Yew Wang Chai, Frederick Jit Fook Phang, Lip Siang Yeo, Lock Hei Ngu, Bing Shen How
    Frontiers in Sustainability.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastroenterology in the Metaverse: The dawn of a new era?
    Chi Zhang, Shuyan Feng, Ruonan He, Yi Fang, Shuo Zhang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Into the Metaverse – Perspectives on a New Reality
    Tariq Rahaman
    Medical Reference Services Quarterly.2022; 41(3): 330.     CrossRef
  • A new universe in Dermatology: From metaverse to Dermoverse
    Miriam Fernández‐Parrado, Héctor Perandones‐González
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Learners’ Adoption of an Educational Metaverse Platform: An Empirical Study Based on an Extended UTAUT Model
    Zhuoqi Teng, Yan Cai, Yu Gao, Xiying Zhang, Xinlong Li, Jungmin Shin
    Mobile Information Systems.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Virtual reality techniques for trauma education
    Micha Holla, Maarten van den Berg
    Injury.2022; 53: S64.     CrossRef
  • The Metaverse: A New Challenge for the Healthcare System: A Scoping Review
    Luca Petrigna, Giuseppe Musumeci
    Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology.2022; 7(3): 63.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Analyzing Teachers' Perception and Needs of Using Metaverse in Elementary Online Learning Environment
    Hyeongjong Han, Sumin Hong
    Journal of Digital Contents Society.2022; 23(8): 1383.     CrossRef
  • Athlete experiences of communication strategies in applied sports nutrition and future considerations for mobile app supportive solutions
    David Mark Dunne, Carmen Lefevre-Lewis, Brian Cunniffe, Samuel George Impey, David Tod, Graeme Leonard Close, James P. Morton, Rebecca Murphy
    Frontiers in Sports and Active Living.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Use of The World of Metaverse in Education and Its Reflections on Accounting Education
    Işık ALTUNAL
    Selçuk Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Meslek Yüksekokulu Dergisi.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Who really needs a Metaverse in anatomy education? A review with preliminary survey results
    Joe Iwanaga, Edward C. Muo, Yoko Tabira, Koichi Watanabe, Susan J. Tubbs, Anthony V. D'Antoni, Mathangi Rajaram‐Gilkes, Marios Loukas, Mohammed K. Khalil, R. Shane Tubbs
    Clinical Anatomy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Social rather than physical crowding reduces the required interpersonal distance in virtual environments
    Ming Han, Xue‐Min Wang, Shu‐Guang Kuai
    PsyCh Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploration of Educational Possibilities by Four Metaverse Types in Physical Education
    Ji-Eun Yu
    Technologies.2022; 10(5): 104.     CrossRef
  • Blockchain‐based asset storage and service mechanism to metaverse universe: Metarepo
    Mevlüt Ersoy, Remzi Gürfidan
    Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The metaverse in education: Definition, framework, features, potential applications, challenges, and future research topics
    Xinli Zhang, Yuchen Chen, Lailin Hu, Youmei Wang
    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The adoption of the metaverse concepts in Romania
    Cătălina Chinie, Marian Oancea, Steluta Todea
    Management & Marketing. Challenges for the Knowledge Society.2022; 17(3): 328.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the application scenarios and issues facing Metaverse technology in education
    Zhisheng Chen
    Interactive Learning Environments.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Public interest in the digital transformation accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic and perception of its future impact
    Joo-Young Park, Kangsun Lee, Doo Ryeon Chung
    The Korean Journal of Internal Medicine.2022; 37(6): 1223.     CrossRef
  • The Arrival of the Metaverse in Neurorehabilitation: Fact, Fake or Vision?
    Rocco Salvatore Calabrò, Antonio Cerasa, Irene Ciancarelli, Loris Pignolo, Paolo Tonin, Marco Iosa, Giovanni Morone
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(10): 2602.     CrossRef
  • The paradigm and future value of the metaverse for the intervention of cognitive decline
    Hao Zhou, Jian-Yi Gao, Ying Chen
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel pathway regarding good cosmetics brands by NFT in the metaverse world
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The significant transformation of life into health and beauty in metaverse era
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in Metaverse Investigation: Streams of Research and Future Agenda
    Mariapina Trunfio, Simona Rossi
    Virtual Worlds.2022; 1(2): 103.     CrossRef
  • Dynamics of Metaverse and Medicine: A Review Article
    Mrudul A Kawarase, Ashish Anjankar
    Cureus.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • METAVERSE SOCIETY: IDENTITY, SPACE AND NEW COMMUNITY
    Filiz GÜVEN, İlkim GÜVEN
    Erciyes Akademi.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Empirical Research on the Metaverse User Experience of Digital Natives
    Han Jin Lee, Hyun Hee Gu
    Sustainability.2022; 14(22): 14747.     CrossRef
  • When Digital Economy Meets Web3.0: Applications and Challenges
    Chuan Chen, Lei Zhang, Yihao Li, Tianchi Liao, Siran Zhao, Zibin Zheng, Huawei Huang, Jiajing Wu
    IEEE Open Journal of the Computer Society.2022; 3: 233.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse as Future Promising Platform Business Model: Case Study on Fashion Value Chain
    Saravanan Periyasami, Aravin Prince Periyasamy
    Businesses.2022; 2(4): 527.     CrossRef
  • Into the RetinaVerse: A New Frontier of Retina in the Metaverse
    Joshua Ong, Seenu M. Hariprasad, Jay Chhablani
    Ophthalmic Surgery, Lasers and Imaging Retina.2022; 53(11): 595.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse and education: the pioneering case of Minecraft in immersive digital learning
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    El Profesional de la información.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sustainable and Safe Consumer Experience NFTs and Raffles in the Cosmetics Market after COVID-19
    Jinkyung Lee, Ki Han Kwon
    Sustainability.2022; 14(23): 15718.     CrossRef
  • Training in lung cancer surgery through the metaverse, including extended reality, in the smart operating room of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Korea
    Huilyung Koo
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 33.     CrossRef
The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review  
Kelly Reynolds, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, Maggie Horn
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:31.   Published online November 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.31
  • 3,077 View
  • 174 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Rehabilitation science programs utilize cognitive and non-cognitive factors to select students who can complete the didactic and clinical portions of the program and pass the licensure exam. Cognitive factors such a prior grade point average and standardized test scores are known to be predictive of academic performance, but the relationship of non-cognitive factors and performance is less clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in rehabilitation science programs.
Methods
A search of 7 databases was conducted using the following eligibility criteria: graduate programs in physical therapy (PT), occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, United States-based programs, measurement of at least 1 non-cognitive factor, measurement of academic and/or clinical performance, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted.
Results
After the comprehensive screening, 21 articles were included in the review. Seventy-six percent of studies occurred in PT students. Grit, self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and stress were the most commonly studied factors. Only self-efficacy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits were examined in clinical and academic contexts. The results were mixed for all non-cognitive factors. Higher grit and self-efficacy tended to be associated with better performance, while stress was generally associated with worse outcomes.
Conclusion
No single non-cognitive factor was consistently related to clinical or academic performance in rehabilitation science students. There is insufficient evidence currently to recommend the evaluation of a specific non-cognitive factor for admissions decisions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of 2 Methods of Debriefing for Learning of Interprofessional Handoff Skills
    Julie Ronnebaum, Chunfa Jie, Kristina Salazar
    Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Interprofessional health education teacher training at the University of Chile  
Mónica Espinoza Barrios, Sandra Oyarzo Torres
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:30.   Published online November 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.30
  • 2,523 View
  • 156 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The first interprofessional course that included students in the 8 undergraduate health programs at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile was implemented in 2015. For the 700 students, 35 teachers were trained as facilitators. The use of several strategies to train facilitators in interprofessional health education, such as working in small groups, role-playing, case analysis, personal development workshops with experts’ participation, teamwork skills, feedback, videos, and reading articles, proved to be helpful. Facilitators highlighted the use of syllabi as a fundamental tool for teaching and coordination. This guide describes the experience of interprofessional health education teacher training from 2015 to 2019, highlighting the following lessons learned: the importance of support from university authorities, raising faculty awareness about interprofessional health education and collaborative practice, creating a teachers’ coordination team including representatives from all health programs, and ongoing monitoring and feedback from participants.
Research article
Are we teaching health science students in the United States what they need to know about death and dying coping strategies?  
Randy D. Case, Erica Judie, Tammy Kurszewski, Wenica Brodie, Pollyann Bethel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:29.   Published online November 11, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.29
  • 2,579 View
  • 177 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This investigation aimed to answer the following questions: are health science students provided with death and dying education before attending clinical rotations, and if so, do the students receiving this type of education perceive it as effective?
Methods
In this descriptive cross-sectional survey, 96 Midwestern State University health science students were surveyed to determine the percentage of students who had received death and dying education before clinical rotations, as well as the students’ perception of educational effectiveness for those who had received end-of-life training. A self-report questionnaire presented nursing, radiologic sciences, and respiratory care students with a series of questions pertaining to the education they had received concerning the death and dying process of patients.
Results
Of the 93 students who had already started their clinical rotations, 55 stated they had not received death and dying education before starting clinical courses. Of the 38 who had received death and dying education, only 17 students believed the training was effective.
Conclusion
It is imperative that health science educational programs implement death and dying education and training into the curriculum, and that criteria for evaluating effectiveness be an essential part of death and dying education and training in order to ensure effectiveness.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Communication skills training in advance care planning: a survey among medical students at the University of Antwerp
    Mick van de Wiel, Katrien Bombeke, Annelies Janssens
    BMC Palliative Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief report
Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study  
Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:28.   Published online November 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.28
  • 2,793 View
  • 146 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to investigate the degree to which newly appointed medical faculty members at the Catholic University of Korea are aware of Harden and Crosby’s 12 educational roles and to identify their preferred educational roles. A 12-item survey questionnaire was distributed to 110 participants, and 100 responses were included in the analysis. The respondents gave the highest score to “clinical or practical teacher” and the lowest score to “curriculum planner” for their current personal competencies. For their preferred personal future competencies, they assigned the highest score to “on the job role model” and the lowest score to “student assessor.” They gave almost equally high values to all 12 roles. However, individual faculty members had different preferences for educational roles. Accordingly, medical schools need to plan and implement customized faculty development programs, and efforts to provide appropriate educational roles according to individual faculty members’ preferences are needed.
Review
E-learning in health professions education during the COVID-19 pandemic: a systematic review  
Aziz Naciri, Mohamed Radid, Ahmed Kharbach, Ghizlane Chemsi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:27.   Published online October 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.27
  • 4,719 View
  • 365 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
As an alternative to traditional teaching, e-learning has enabled continuity of learning for health professions students during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This review explored health professions students; perceptions, acceptance, motivation, and engagement with e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, a systematic review was conducted by consulting 5 databases: PubMed, ERIC (Ebsco), Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. The quality of the included studies was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument. The research protocol was previously registered in the PROSPERO registry (CRD42021237055). From 250 studies identified, 15 were selected with a total of 111,622 students. Mostly positive perceptions were reported in 7 of 12 studies, which mainly focused on technology access, possession of basic computer skills, pedagogical design of online courses, online interactions, and learning flexibility. However, predominantly negative perceptions were identified in 5 of 12 studies, which pointed out constraints related to internet connections, the use of educational platforms, and acquisition of clinical skills. Satisfactory levels of acceptance of distance learning were reported in 3 of 4 studies. For student motivation and engagement, 1 study reported similar or higher motivation than with traditional teaching, and another study indicated that student engagement significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health professions students showed a positive response to e-learning regarding perceptions, acceptance, motivation, and engagement. Future research is needed to remediate the lack of studies addressing health professions students’ motivation and engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry.2022; 37(3): 255.     CrossRef
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    Weicai Peng, Shuchao Wang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on medical teaching in obstetrics and gynecology—A nationwide expert survey among teaching coordinators at German university hospitals
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  • Educational impact of an active learning session with 6-lead mobile electrocardiography on medical students’ knowledge of cardiovascular physiology during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States: a survey-based observational study
    Alexandra Camille Greb, Emma Altieri, Irene Masini, Emily Helena Frisch, Milton Leon Greenberg
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 12.     CrossRef
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    Nurse Education Today.2022; 118: 105527.     CrossRef
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    Nervenheilkunde.2022; 41(09): 551.     CrossRef
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    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    ProCare.2022; 27(6-7): 52.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Mental Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Research articles
Definition of character for medical education based on expert opinions in Korea  
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:26.   Published online September 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.26
  • 3,205 View
  • 213 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This follow-up study focused on 3 overarching questions: what keywords can be extracted from experts’ definitions of character?; what is the operational definition of character for medical students?; and what possible solutions can be suggested to address the issues of character education that were identified in the previous study?
Methods
Sixty-three medical education experts recruited through expert sampling and 19 non-medical education experts recruited through snowball sampling answered a questionnaire that addressed the 3 major questions of the study. The responses were analyzed for descriptive statistics with supplementary keyword extraction tools, including the Cortical and Monkey keyword extractors.
Results
A total of 93 definitional statements were counted, and 138 keyword terms were extracted. The top 5 keyword terms mentioned by the medical education experts were “patient”, “empathy”, “qualities”, “attitude”, and “ability”. These keyword terms were quite different from those mentioned by the non-medical education experts. Based on the extracted keywords, an operational definition of character education by the medical education expert group was presented as follows: the basic qualities and ability to empathize with patients affected by illness based on respect for patients and others. Various methods were proposed to solve the issue of character education, and many of them pointed to curriculum development, such as improvements in teaching and learning methods and evaluation methods, including role modeling.
Conclusion
A clear statement of the concept of character education is the start to resolve issues of character education. Character education improvements will be possible at the institutional level according to the above results.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical students’ self-evaluation of character, and method of character education
    Yera Hur, Sanghee Yeo, Keumho Lee
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of mentoring, supervision, coaching, teaching and instruction on professional identity formation: a systematic scoping review
    Rachelle Qi En Toh, Kai Kee Koh, Jun Kiat Lua, Ruth Si Man Wong, Elaine Li Ying Quah, Aiswarya Panda, Chong Yao Ho, Nicole-Ann Lim, Yun Ting Ong, Keith Zi Yuan Chua, Victoria Wen Wei Ng, Sabine Lauren Chyi Hui Wong, Luke Yu Xuan Yeo, Sin Yee See, Jolene J
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea  
Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:25.   Published online September 27, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.25
  • 3,409 View
  • 243 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Setting standards is critical in health professions. However, appropriate standard setting methods do not always apply to the set cut score in performance assessment. The aim of this study was to compare the cut score when the standard setting is changed from the norm-referenced method to the borderline group method (BGM) and borderline regression method (BRM) in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in medical school.
Methods
This was an explorative study to model the implementation of the BGM and BRM. A total of 107 fourth-year medical students attended the OSCE at 7 stations for encountering standardized patients (SPs) and at 1 station for performing skills on a manikin on July 15th, 2021. Thirty-two physician examiners evaluated the performance by completing a checklist and global rating scales.
Results
The cut score of the norm-referenced method was lower than that of the BGM (P<0.01) and BRM (P<0.02). There was no significant difference in the cut score between the BGM and BRM (P=0.40). The station with the highest standard deviation and the highest proportion of the borderline group showed the largest cut score difference in standard setting methods.
Conclusion
Prefixed cut scores by the norm-referenced method without considering station contents or examinee performance can vary due to station difficulty and content, affecting the appropriateness of standard setting decisions. If there is an adequate consensus on the criteria for the borderline group, standard setting with the BRM could be applied as a practical and defensible method to determine the cut score for OSCE.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Possibility of using the yes/no Angoff method as a substitute for the percent Angoff method for estimating the cutoff score of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination: a simulation study
    Janghee Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 23.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
Changes in academic performance in the online, integrated system-based curriculum implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic in a medical school in Korea  
Do-Hwan Kim, Hyo Jeong Lee, Yanyan Lin, Ye Ji Kang
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:24.   Published online September 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.24
  • 3,875 View
  • 266 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study examined how students’ academic performance changed after undergoing a transition to online learning during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, based on the test results of 16 integrated courses conducted in 3 semesters at Hanyang University College of Medicine in Korea.
Methods
For the 16 required courses that formed an integrated system-based curriculum running for 3 semesters, the major examinations’ raw scores were collected for each student. Percent-correct scores were used in the subsequent analysis. We used the t-test to compare grades between 2019 and 2020, and the Cohen D was calculated as a measure of effect size. The correlation of scores between courses was calculated using Pearson correlation coefficients.
Results
There was a significant decrease in scores in 2020 for 10 courses (62.5%). While most of the integrated system-based curriculum test scores showed strong correlations, with coefficients of 0.6 or higher in both 2019 and 2020, the correlation coefficients were generally higher in 2020. When students were divided into low, middle, and high achievement groups, low-achieving students consistently showed declining test scores in all 3 semesters.
Conclusion
Our findings suggest that the transition to online classes due to COVID-19 has led to an overall decline in academic performance. This overall decline, which may occur when the curriculum is centered on recorded lectures, needs to be addressed. Further, medical schools need to consider establishing a support system for the academic development of low-achieving students.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The impact of asynchronous online anatomy teaching and smaller learning groups in the anatomy laboratory on medical students’ performance during the Covid‐19 pandemic
    Ming‐Fong Chang, Meng‐Lin Liao, June‐Horng Lue, Chi‐Chuan Yeh
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2022; 15(3): 476.     CrossRef
  • Educational impact of an active learning session with 6-lead mobile electrocardiography on medical students’ knowledge of cardiovascular physiology during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States: a survey-based observational study
    Alexandra Camille Greb, Emma Altieri, Irene Masini, Emily Helena Frisch, Milton Leon Greenberg
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 12.     CrossRef
  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 Cases at Universities and Colleges in Seoul Metropolitan Area
    Young June Choe, Yun-Kyung Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia  
Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:23.   Published online September 23, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.23
  • 3,333 View
  • 199 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It aimed to compare the use of the tele-objective structured clinical examination (teleOSCE) with in-person assessment in high-stakes clinical examination so as to determine the impact of the teleOSCE on the assessment undertaken. Discussion follows regarding what skills and domains can effectively be assessed in a teleOSCE.
Methods
This study is a retrospective observational analysis. It compares the results achieved by final year medical students in their clinical examination, assessed using the teleOSCE in 2020 (n=285), with those who were examined using the traditional in-person format in 2019 (n=280). The study was undertaken at the University of New South Wales, Australia.
Results
In the domain of physical examination, students in 2020 scored 0.277 points higher than those in 2019 (mean difference=–0.277, P<0.001, effect size=0.332). Across all other domains, there was no significant difference in mean scores between 2019 and 2020.
Conclusion
The teleOSCE does not negatively impact assessment in clinical examination in all domains except physical examination. If the teleOSCE is the future of clinical skills examination, assessment of physical examination will require concomitant workplace-based assessment.

Citations

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  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
No difference in learning outcomes and usability between using controllers and hand tracking during a virtual reality endotracheal intubation training for medical students in Thailand  
Chaowanan Khundam, Naparat Sukkriang, Frédéric Noël
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:22.   Published online August 18, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.22
  • 3,474 View
  • 297 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We developed a virtual reality (VR) endotracheal intubation training that applied 2 interaction modalities (hand-tracking or controllersIt aimed to investigatedthe differences of usuability between using hand tracking and controllers during the VR intervention for intubation training for medical students from February 2021 to March 2021 in Thailand.
Methods
Forty-five participants were divided into 3 groups: video only, video with VR controller training, and video with VR hand tracking training. Pre-test, post-test, and practice scores were used to assess learning outcomes. The System Usability Scale (SUS) and User Satisfaction Evaluation Questionnaire (USEQ) questionnaires were used to evaluate the differences between the VR groups. The sample comprised 45 medical students (undergraduate) who were taking part in clinical training at Walailak University in Thailand.
Results
The overall learning outcomes of both VR groups were better than those of the video group. The post-test scores (P=0.581) and practice scores (P=0.168) of both VR groups were not significantly different. Similarly, no significant between-group differences were found in the SUS scores (P=0.588) or in any aspects of the USEQ scores.
Conclusion
VR enhanced medical training. Interactions using hand tracking or controllers were not significantly different in terms of the outcomes measured in this study. The results and interviews provided a better understanding of support learning and training, which will be further improved and developed to create a self-learning VR medical training system in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Virtual Simulation in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Scoping Review of Recent Practice
    Qingming Wu, Yubin Wang, Lili Lu, Yong Chen, Hui Long, Jun Wang
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Educational/faculty development material
Implementation and lessons learned from 2 online interprofessional faculty development programs for improving educational practice in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021  
Cesar Orsini, Veena Rodrigues, Jorge Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:21.   Published online August 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.21
  • 4,187 View
  • 279 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study presents the design, implementation, and lessons learned from 2 fit-for-purpose online interprofessional faculty development programs for educational practice improvement in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021. Both programs were designed to enhance teaching and learning practices in an interprofessional environment based on 4 pillars: professional diversity, egalitarianism, blended/online learning, and active learning strategies. A multidisciplinary mix of educators participated, showing similar results. The 3 main lessons learned were that the following factors facilitated an interprofessional environment: a professions-inclusive teaching style, a flexible learning climate, and interprofessional peer work. These lessons may be transferable to other programs seeking to enhance and support interprofessionality. Faculty development initiatives preparing educators for interprofessional practice should be an integral component of health professions education, as delivering these courses within professional silos is no longer justifiable. As the relevance of interprofessional education grows, an effective way of promoting interprofessonal education is to train the trainers in formal interprofessional settings.

Citations

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  • Perceived team roles of medical students: a five year cross-sectional study
    Anke Boone, Mathieu Roelants, Karel Hoppenbrouwers, Corinne Vandermeulen, Marc Du Bois, Lode Godderis
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Editorial
The Journal Citation Indicator has arrived for Emerging Sources Citation Index journals, including the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, in June 2021
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:20.   Published online August 2, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.20
  • 3,810 View
  • 233 Download
  • 3 Citations
PDF

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    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
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    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
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Research article
Trainees’ perceptions and expectations of formal academic mentoring during the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesian cardiology residency programs  
Sunu Budhi Raharjo, Rita Mustika, Aida Lydia, Mefri Yanni, Heru Sulastomo, Rahma Tsania Zhuhra, Celly Anantaria Atmadikoesoemah
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:19.   Published online August 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.19
  • 3,420 View
  • 291 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
During medical residency programs, physicians develop their professional identities as specialists and encounter high expectations in terms of achieving competencies. The responsibilities of medical trainees include caring for patients, balancing work with personal life, and weathering stress, depression, and burnout. Formal academic mentoring programs strive to ease these burdens. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has altered the trainee–academic mentor relationship, and solutions are needed to address these challenges. The present study aimed to evaluate the formal academic mentoring process through trainees’ perceptions and expectations of formal mentoring programs during COVID-19 in Indonesian cardiology residency programs.
Methods
This cross-sectional study used a self-administered online questionnaire to capture trainees’ perceptions and expectations regarding academic mentoring programs in 3 cardiology residency programs in Indonesia from October to November 2020. The questionnaire was developed before data collection. Perceptions of the existing mentoring programs were compared with expectations.
Results
Responses were gathered from 169 out of 174 residents (response rate, 97.3%). Most trainees reported having direct contact with COVID-19 patients (88.82%). They stated that changes had taken place in the mode and frequency of communication with their academic advisors during the pandemic. Significant differences were found between trainees’ perceptions of the existing mentoring programs and their expectations for academic mentoring programs (P<0.001).
Conclusion
Despite the challenges of interacting with their academic mentors, trainees still perceived academic mentors as a vital resource. Study programs need to consider trainees’ expectations when designing academic mentoring programs.

Citations

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  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on career intention amongst undergraduate medical students: a single-centre cross-sectional study conducted in Hubei Province
    Xue-lin Wang, Ming-xiu Liu, Shuai Peng, Lei Yang, Chen Lu, Shi-cong Shou, Jian-ru Wang, Jun-yi Sun, Jia-qi Wang, Yan Hu, Jun Zhao, Peng Duan
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions