Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Previous issues

Page Path
HOME > Browse articles > Previous issues
41 Previous issues
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Authors
Funded articles
Volume 16; 2019
Prev issue Next issue

Editorial
Journal statistics, coping strategy with upcoming scholarly journal publishing environment including Plan-S, and appreciation for reviewers and volunteers
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:41.   Published online December 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.41
  • 5,261 View
  • 105 Download
  • 4 Citations
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Promotion to Top-Tier Journal and Development Strategy of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine for Strengthening its Leadership in the Medical Laboratory Technology Category: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
  • Was the number of submissions to scholarly journals in Korea affected by the COVID-19 pandemic?
    Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2021; 8(1): 117.     CrossRef
  • Journal of Obesity & Metabolic Syndrome: A Platform for Acquiring and Disseminating the Most Recent Research Findings and Developing Research Concepts about Obesity
    Soo Lim
    Journal of Obesity & Metabolic Syndrome.2020; 29(4): 241.     CrossRef
  • Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 44.     CrossRef
Review
How to execute Context, Input, Process, and Product evaluation model in medical health education  
So young Lee, Jwa-Seop Shin, Seung-Hee Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:40.   Published online December 28, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.40
  • 10,069 View
  • 394 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Improvements to education are necessary in order to keep up with the education requirements of today. The Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP) evaluation model was created for the decision-making towards education improvement, so this model is appropriate in this regard. However, application of this model in the actual context of medical health education is considered difficult in the education environment. Thus, in this study, literature survey of previous studies was investigated to examine the execution procedure of how the CIPP model can be actually applied. For the execution procedure utilizing the CIPP model, the criteria and indicators were determined from analysis results and material was collected after setting the material collection method. Afterwards, the collected material was analyzed for each CIPP element, and finally, the relationship of each CIPP element was analyzed for the final improvement decision-making. In this study, these steps were followed and the methods employed in previous studies were organized. Particularly, the process of determining the criteria and indicators was important and required a significant effort. Literature survey was carried out to analyze the most widely used criteria through content analysis and obtained a total of 12 criteria. Additional emphasis is necessary in the importance of the criteria selection for the actual application of the CIPP model. Also, a diverse range of information can be obtained through qualitative as well as quantitative methods. Above all, since the CIPP evaluation model execution result becomes the basis for the execution of further improved evaluations, the first attempt of performing without hesitation is essential.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exploring the Components of the Research Empowerment Program of the Faculty Members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran Based on the CIPP Model: A Qualitative Study
    Mostafa Jafari, Susan Laei, Elham Kavyani, Rostam Jalali
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in the accreditation standards of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation from 2000 to 2019
    Hyo Hyun Yoo, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Keun Mi Lee, Jong Hun Lee, Seung-Jae Hong, Jung –Sik Huh, Won Kyun Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 2.     CrossRef
  • Human Resources Development via Higher Education Scholarships: A Case Study of a Ministry of Public Works and Housing Scholarship Program
    Abdullatif SETİABUDİ
    International e-Journal of Educational Studies.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring Components, Barriers, and Solutions for Faculty Members’ Research Empowerment Programs Based on the CIPP Model: A Qualitative Study
    Mostafa Jafari, Soosan Laei, Elham Kavyani, Rostam Jalali
    Journal of Occupational Health and Epidemiology.2020; 9(4): 213.     CrossRef
Research articles
Effects of a cultural nursing course to enhance the cultural competence of nursing students in Korea  
Hae Sook Park, Hee Jung Jang, Geum Hee Jeong
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:39.   Published online December 27, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.39
  • 6,865 View
  • 208 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
With Korea’s recent rapid change into a multicultural society, cultural competence is being emphasized as a core nursing competency. This study investigated the effects of a cultural nursing course that aimed to enhance the cultural competence of nursing students in Korea.
Methods
This was a single-group pre- and post-comparison study. The subjects were 69 nursing students at Dongyang University who attended a cultural nursing course in 2015, of whom 62 students responded to the survey. The 13-week cultural nursing course was held for 2 hours a week. The methods of the course included small group activities, discussions and presentations, experiential learning, reflective activities, and lectures. Nursing students’ cultural competence was measured pre- and post-course with the Cultural Competence Scale for Korean Nurses, which contains 33 items scored on a 7-point Likert scale.
Results
After completing the cultural nursing course, students’ total cultural competence scores increased, as did their scores in each category (cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural sensitivity, and cultural skills) (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in cultural competence by gender (P<0.001).
Conclusion
This cultural nursing course was found to be effective in enhancing the cultural competence of nursing students. Therefore, the educational program developed in this study can be extended to other university-level nursing programs in Korea.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development and Evaluation of Cultural Competence Course on Undergraduate Nursing Students in Vietnam
    Trang-Thi-Thuy Ho, Jina Oh
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(2): 888.     CrossRef
  • Identifikacija merskih instrumentov za merjenje kulturnih kompetenc pri medicinskih sestrah in študentih zdravstvene nege
    Liridon Avdylaj, Sabina Ličen
    Obzornik zdravstvene nege.2022; 56(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Organisational and staff-related effects on cultural competence in the hospital setting: a cross-sectional online survey of nursing and medical staff
    Liane Schenk, Pia-Theresa Sonntag, Patricia Beck, Zohra Khan, Lisa Peppler, Meryam Schouler-Ocak
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Nursing students’ experience of learning cultural competence
    Isabel Antón-Solanas, Elena Tambo-Lizalde, Nadia Hamam-Alcober, Valérie Vanceulebroeck, Shana Dehaes, Indrani Kalkan, Nuran Kömürcü, Margarida Coelho, Teresa Coelho, Antonio Casa Nova, Raul Cordeiro, Lucía Sagarra-Romero, Ana B. Subirón-Valera, Isabel Hué
    PLOS ONE.2021; 16(12): e0259802.     CrossRef
Evaluation of a portfolio-based course on self-development for pre-medical students in Korea  
Dong Mi Yoo, A Ra Cho, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:38.   Published online December 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.38
  • 4,726 View
  • 106 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
We have developed and operated a portfolio-based course aimed at strengthening pre-medical students’ capabilities for self-management and self-improvement. In order to determine the effectiveness of the course and to establish future operational strategies, we evaluated the course and the students’ learning experience.
Methods
The subjects of this study were 97 students of a pre-medical course “Self-development and portfolio I” in 2019. Their learning experience was evaluated through the professor’s assessment of portfolios they had submitted, and the program was evaluated based on the responses of 68 students who completed a survey. The survey questionnaire included 32 items. Descriptive statistics were reported for quantitative data, including the mean and standard deviation. Opinions collected from the open-ended question were grouped into categories.
Results
The evaluation of students’ portfolios showed that only 6.2% of the students’ portfolios were well-organized, with specific goals, strategies, processes, and self-reflections, while most lacked the basic components of a portfolio (46.4%) or contained insufficient content (47.4%). Students’ responses to the survey showed that regular portfolio personality assessments (72.1%), team (64.7%), and individual (60.3%) activities were felt to be more appropriate as educational methods for this course, rather than lectures. Turning to the portfolio creation experience, the forms and components of the portfolios (68.2%) and the materials provided (62.2%) were felt to be appropriate. However, students felt that individual autonomy needed to be reflected more (66.7%) and that this course interfered with other studies (42.5%).
Conclusion
The findings of this study suggest that standardized samples, guidelines, and sufficient time for autonomous portfolio creation should be provided. In addition, education on portfolio utilization should be conducted in small groups in the future.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Medical Student Portfolios: A Systematic Scoping Review
    Rei Tan, Jacquelin Jia Qi Ting, Daniel Zhihao Hong, Annabelle Jia Sing Lim, Yun Ting Ong, Anushka Pisupati, Eleanor Jia Xin Chong, Min Chiam, Alexia Sze Inn Lee, Laura Hui Shuen Tan, Annelissa Mien Chew Chin, Limin Wijaya, Warren Fong, Lalit Kumar Radha K
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2022; 9: 238212052210760.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a portfolio assessment system for medical schools in Korea
    Dong Mi Yoo, A Ra Cho, Sun Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 39.     CrossRef
How dental students’ course experiences and satisfaction of their basic psychological needs influence passion for studying in Chile  
Cesar Orsini, Jorge Tricio, Doris Tapia, Cristina Segura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:37.   Published online November 29, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.37
  • 6,688 View
  • 224 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to determine how the general course experiences of dental students in Chile and the satisfaction or frustration of their basic psychological needs influenced their passion for studying, and how passion influenced students’ study strategies.
Methods
A correlational cross-sectional study was conducted at 3 Chilean dental schools between April and June 2018, in which 935 undergraduate students participated. Students responded to Spanish-language versions of 4 psychological scale tools: the Course Experience Questionnaire, the Basic Psychological Needs Satisfac¬tion and Frustration Scale, the Passion Scale, and the Revised Study Process Questionnaire. Data were analysed with bivariate correlations and structural equation modelling, controlling for age, gender, year of study, and type of university.
Results
Students’ general course experiences (i.e., good teaching, clear goals and standards, appropriate assessment, and appropriate workload) positively predicted basic need satisfaction and negatively predicted need frustration. Need satisfaction positively predicted passion in students, with stronger scores for harmonious passion. Basic need frustration positively predicted obsessive passion and negatively predicted harmonious passion. Harmonious passion positively predicted deep study strategies and negatively predicted surface study strategies, while obsessive passion positively predicted both deep and surface study strategies.
Conclusion
Dental students’ optimal course experiences positively influenced the satisfaction of their basic psychological needs, which favoured harmonious over obsessive passion. In turn, harmonious over obsessive passion positively influenced deep study strategies. Therefore, efforts should be made to provide course experiences that support students’ basic needs and harmonious passion for studying, both in classroom and chair-side teaching.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Job crafting and well-being among school principals: The role of basic psychological need satisfaction and frustration
    Hiroyuki Toyama, Katja Upadyaya, Katariina Salmela-Aro
    European Management Journal.2022; 40(5): 809.     CrossRef
A conceptual model for students’ satisfaction with team-based learning using partial least squares structural equation modelling in a faculty of life sciences, in the United Kingdom  
Andrea Manfrin, Bugewa Apampa, Prabha Parthasarathy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:36.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.36
  • 7,948 View
  • 202 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Students’ satisfaction is an essential element in higher education. This study aimed to identify paths and predictive power of students’ satisfaction during team-based learning (TBL) activities in the faculty of life sciences using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).
Methods
In 2018–2019, at the University of Sussex (Falmer, UK), 180 life science students exposed to TBL were invited to participate in the study. Team-Based-Learning-Student-Assessment-Instrument was used. A conceptual model was developed for testing six hypotheses. H1: What was the effect of TBL on student satisfaction? H2: What was the effect of lectures on student satisfaction? H3: What was the effect of TBL on accountability? H4: What was the effect of lectures on accountability? H5: What was the effect of accountability on student satisfaction? H6: What were the in-sample and out-of-sample predictive power of the model? The analysis was conducted using the PLS-SEM approach.
Results
Ninety-nine students participated in the study giving a 55% response rate. Confirmatory tetrad analysis suggested a reflective model. Construct reliability, validity, average extracted variance, and discriminant validity were confirmed. All path coefficients were positive, and 5 were statistically significant (H1: β=0.587, P<0:001; H2: β=0.262, P<0.001; H3: β=0.532, P<0.001; H4: β=0.063, P=0.546; H5: β=0.200, P=0.002). The in-sample predictive power was weak for Accountability, (R2=0.303; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.117–0.428; P<0.001) and substantial for Student Satisfaction (R2=0.678; 95% CI, 0.498–0.777; P<0.001). The out-of-sample predictive power was moderate.
Conclusion
The results have demonstrated the possibility of developing and testing a TBL conceptual model using PLS-SEM for the evaluation of path coefficients and predictive power relative to students’ satisfaction.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A SEM-NCA Approach towards Social Networks Marketing: Evaluating Consumers’ Sustainable Purchase Behavior with the Moderating Role of Eco-Friendly Attitude
    Pejman Ebrahimi, Datis Khajeheian, Maria Fekete-Farkas
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(24): 13276.     CrossRef
Evaluation of student perceptions with 2 interprofessional assessment tools—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale—following didactic and clinical learning experiences in the United States  
Vincent Dennis, Melissa Craft, Dale Bratzler, Melody Yozzo, Denise Bender, Christi Barbee, Stephen Neely, Margaret Robinson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:35.   Published online November 5, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.35
  • 8,468 View
  • 193 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study investigated changes in students’ attitudes using 2 validated interprofessional survey instruments—the Collaborative Healthcare Interdisciplinary Relationship Planning (CHIRP) instrument and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale (IPAS)—before and after didactic and clinical cohorts.
Methods
Students from 7 colleges/schools participated in didactic and clinical cohorts during the 2017–2018 year. Didactic cohorts experienced 2 interactive sessions 6 months apart, while clinical cohorts experienced 4 outpatient clinical sessions once monthly. For the baseline and post-cohort assessments, 865 students were randomly assigned to complete either the 14-item CHIRP or the 27-item IPAS. The Pittman test using permutations of linear ranks was used to determine differences in the score distribution between the baseline and post-cohort assessments. Pooled results were compared for the CHIRP total score and the IPAS total and subdomain scores. For each score, 3 comparisons were made simultaneously: overall baseline versus post-didactic cohort, overall baseline versus post-clinical cohort, and post-didactic cohort versus post-clinical cohort. Alpha was adjusted to 0.0167 to account for simultaneous comparisons.
Results
The baseline and post-cohort survey response rates were 62.4% and 65.9% for CHIRP and 58.7% and 58.1% for IPAS, respectively. The post-clinical cohort scores for the IPAS subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities were significantly higher than the baseline and post-didactic cohort scores. No differences were seen for the remaining IPAS subdomain scores or the CHIRP instrument total score.
Conclusion
The IPAS instrument may discern changes in student attitudes in the subdomain of teamwork, roles, and responsibilities following short-term clinical experiences involving diverse interprofessional team members.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • To IPAS or not to IPAS? Examining the construct validity of the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale in Hong Kong
    Fraide A. Ganotice, Amy Yin Man Chow, Kelvin Kai Hin Fan, Ui Soon Khoo, May Pui San Lam, Rebecca Po Wah Poon, Francis Hang Sang Tsoi, Michael Ning Wang, George L. Tipoe
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(1): 127.     CrossRef
  • Turkish adaptation of the interprofessional attitude scale (IPAS)
    Mukadder Inci Baser Kolcu, Ozlem Surel Karabilgin Ozturkcu, Giray Kolcu
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; 36(5): 684.     CrossRef
  • Patient participation in interprofessional learning and collaboration with undergraduate health professional students in clinical placements: A scoping review
    Catrine Buck Jensen, Bente Norbye, Madeleine Abrandt Dahlgren, Anita Iversen
    Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice.2022; 27: 100494.     CrossRef
  • Can interprofessional education change students’ attitudes? A case study from Lebanon
    Carine J. Sakr, Lina Fakih, Jocelyn Dejong, Nuhad Yazbick-Dumit, Hussein Soueidan, Wiam Haidar, Elias Boufarhat, Imad Bou Akl
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and implementation of interprofessional education activity among health professions students in Jordan: A pilot investigation
    Osama Y. Alshogran, Zaid Al-Hamdan, Alla El-Awaisi, Hana Alkhalidy, Nesreen Saadeh, Hadeel Alsqaier
    Journal of Interprofessional Care.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Development of a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program based on Gagne’s instructional design model in Iran through consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel  
Saeideh Daryazadeh, Nikoo Yamani, Payman Adibi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:34.   Published online October 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.34
  • 7,195 View
  • 146 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Narrative medicine is a patient-centered approach focusing on the development of narrative skills and self-awareness that incorporates “attending, representing, and affiliating” in clinical encounters. Acquiring narrative competency promotes clinical performance, and narratives can be used for teaching professionalism, empathy, multicultural education, and professional development. This study was conducted to develop a checklist to validate the framework of a narrative medicine program through consensus of a panel.
Methods
This expert panel study was conducted from 2018 to 2019 at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. It included 2 phases: developing a framework in 2 steps and forming an expert panel to validate the framework in 3 rounds. We adapted a 3-stage narrative medicine model with 9 training activities from Gagne’s theory, developed a framework, and then produced a checklist to validate the framework in a multidisciplinary expert panel that consisted of 7 experts. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness method was used to assess the experts’ agreement. The first-round opinions were received by email. Consensus was achieved in the second and third rounds through face-to-face meetings to facilitate interactions and discussion among the experts.
Results
Sixteen valid indicators were approved and 100% agreement was obtained among experts (with median values in the range of 7–9 out of a maximum of 9, with no disagreement), and the framework was validated by the expert panel.
Conclusion
The 16 checklist indicators can be used to evaluate narrative medicine programs as a simple and practical guide to improve teaching effectiveness and promote life-long learning.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Challenges of Implementing the First Narrative Medicine Course for Teaching Professionalism in Iran: A Qualitative Content Analysis
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani
    Educational Research in Medical Sciences.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of a narrative medicine program on reflective capacity and empathy of medical students in Iran
    Saeideh Daryazadeh, Payman Adibi, Nikoo Yamani, Roya Mollabashi
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 3.     CrossRef
Impact of interprofessional education on students of the health professions: a systematic review  
Amy Leigh Dyess, Jordyn Shelby Brown, Natasha Dianne Brown, Katherine Merrill Flautt, Lisa Jayroe Barnes
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:33.   Published online October 23, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.33
  • 10,895 View
  • 384 Download
  • 15 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Interprofessional education (IPE) is a concept that allows students from different health professions to learn with and from each other as they gain knowledge about their chosen professions and the professions of their colleagues. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of IPE in the academic preparation of students of the health professions.
Methods
A search was conducted of the PubMed and CINAHL databases using the following eligibility criteria: IPE including students from 3 or more healthcare professions, IPE exposure within academic coursework, measurement of attitudes and/or perceptions as outcomes, and quantitative reporting of results. Articles were screened by title, abstract, and full text, and data were extracted.
Results
The search yielded 870 total articles. After screening, 7 articles remained for review. All studies reported a positive impact of IPE on the education of students of the health professions.
Conclusion
Evidence showed that IPE activities were an effective tool for improving attitudes toward interdisciplinary teamwork, communication, shared problem-solving, and knowledge and skills in preparation for collaboration within interdisciplinary teams.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Nursing students’ experiences of applying problem‐based learning to train the core competence teamwork and collaboration: An interview study
    Camilla Allert, Helén Dellkvist, Markus Hjelm, Ewa K. Andersson
    Nursing Open.2022; 9(1): 569.     CrossRef
  • The effect of ISBARR on knowledge of and attitudes about interprofessional communication skills among Chinese undergraduate nursing students
    Weiwen Wang, Juan Shen, W. Brian Greene, Dianxu Ren, Paula Sherwood
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 109: 105207.     CrossRef
  • Undergraduate-level teaching and learning approaches for interprofessional education in the health professions: a systematic review
    Marwh Gassim Aldriwesh, Sarah Mohammed Alyousif, Nouf Sulaiman Alharbi
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Experiences of physical therapists during the COVID-19 pandemic: an interpretive phenomenological analysis
    Marc Campo, Matthew Hyland, Ruth Hansen
    Physiotherapy Theory and Practice.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • How does interprofessional education influence students’ perceptions of collaboration in the clinical setting? A qualitative study
    Carolyn Teuwen, Stéphanie van der Burgt, Rashmi Kusurkar, Hermien Schreurs, Hester Daelmans, Saskia Peerdeman
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validation of a Very Brief Assessment of Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Skill Gains: ICCAS-Q21
    Patricia J. Ohtake, Daniel J. Kruger, Jessica S. Kruger
    Journal of Physical Therapy Education.2022; 36(4): 311.     CrossRef
  • Enhancing interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education in women’s health
    Laura Baecher-Lind, Angela C. Fleming, Rashmi Bhargava, Susan M. Cox, Elise N. Everett, David A. Forstein, Shireen Madani Sims, Helen K. Morgan, Christopher M. Morosky, Celeste S. Royce, Tammy S. Sonn, Jill M. Sutton, Scott C. Graziano
    Medical Education Online.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Formation des étudiants en pharmacie d’officine et en médecine générale à la communication interprofessionnelle : évaluation d’un programme de simulation
    I. Bodein, M. Forestier, C. Le Borgne, J.-M. Lefebvre, C. Pinçon, A. Garat, A. Standaert, B. Décaudin
    Annales Pharmaceutiques Françaises.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Designing Oral Health Curriculum That Facilitates Greater Integration of Oral Health Into Overall Health
    Keith A. Mays
    Frontiers in Dental Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of an Interprofessional Education Model to Influence Students' Perceptions on Interdisciplinary Work
    Eva Swinnen, Maaike Fobelets, Nele Adriaenssens, Ellen Vandyck, Guido Goelen, Elke Moortgat, Dorothée Laforge, Wim Peersman
    Journal of Nursing Education.2021; 60(9): 494.     CrossRef
  • Intraprofessional workplace learning in postgraduate medical education: a scoping review
    Lara Teheux, Ester H. A. J. Coolen, Jos M. T. Draaisma, Marieke de Visser, Nynke D. Scherpbier-de Haan, Wietske Kuijer-Siebelink, Janiëlle A. E. M. van der Velden
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exposing undergraduate medical students to inter-professionalism education in the competency-based curriculum
    SaurabhRamBihariLal Shrivastava, PrateekSaurabh Shrivastava
    MAMC Journal of Medical Sciences.2020; 6(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • A virtual patient model for students’ interprofessional learning in primary healthcare
    Carrie Tran, Eva Toth-Pal, Solvig Ekblad, Uno Fors, Helena Salminen, Elisa J. F. Houwink
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(9): e0238797.     CrossRef
  • “It’s Not Just About Getting Along”: Exploring Learning Through the Discourse and Practice of Interprofessional Collaboration
    Maria Athina (Tina) Martimianakis, Oshan Fernando, Rayfel Schneider, Shirley Tse, Maria Mylopoulos
    Academic Medicine.2020; 95(11S): S73.     CrossRef
  • Personality and learning styles in relation to attitudes towards interprofessional education: a cross-sectional study on undergraduate medical students during their clinical courses
    Caroline Olsson, Hanna Lachmann, Susanne Kalén, Sari Ponzer, Cecilia Mellstrand Navarro
    BMC Medical Education.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Effect of student-directed solicitation of evaluation forms on the timeliness of completion by preceptors in the United States  
Conrad Krawiec, Vonn Walter, Abigail Kate Myers
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:32.   Published online October 16, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.32
  • 7,926 View
  • 116 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Summative evaluation forms assessing a student’s clinical performance are often completed by a faculty preceptor at the end of a clinical training experience. At our institution, despite the use of an electronic system, timeliness of completion has been suboptimal, potentially limiting our ability to monitor students’ progress. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a student-directed approach to summative evaluation form collection at the end of a pediatrics clerkship would enhance timeliness of completion for third-year medical students.
Methods
This was a pre- and post-intervention educational quality improvement project focused on 156 (82 pre-intervention, 74 post-intervention) third-year medical students at Penn State College of Medicine completing their 4-week pediatric clerkship. Utilizing REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) informatics support, student-directed evaluation form solicitation was encouraged. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was applied to compare the pre-intervention (May 1, 2017 to March 2, 2018) and post-intervention (April 2, 2018 to December 21, 2018) percentages of forms completed before the rotation midpoint.
Results
In total, 740 evaluation forms were submitted during the pre-intervention phase and 517 during the post-intervention phase. The percentage of forms completed before the rotation midpoint increased after implementing student-directed solicitation (9.6% vs. 39.7%, P<0.05).
Conclusion
Our clerkship relies on subjective summative evaluations to track students’ progress, deploy improvement strategies, and determine criteria for advancement; however, our preceptors struggled with timely submission. Allowing students to direct the solicitation of evaluation forms enhanced the timeliness of completion and should be considered in clerkships facing similar challenges.
Application of an objective structured clinical examination to evaluate and monitor interns’ proficiency in hand hygiene and personal protective equipment use in the United States  
Ying Nagoshi, Lou Ann Cooper, Lynne Meyer, Kartik Cherabuddi, Julia Close, Jamie Dow, Merry Jennifer Markham, Carolyn Stalvey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:31.   Published online October 15, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.31
  • 8,450 View
  • 134 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine whether an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) could be used to evaluate and monitor hand hygiene and personal protective equipment (PPE) proficiency among medical interns in the United States.
Methods
Interns in July 2015 (N=123, cohort 1) with no experience of OSCE-based contact precaution evaluation and teaching were evaluated in early 2016 using an OSCE for hand hygiene and PPE proficiency. They performed poorly. Therefore, the new interns entering in July 2016 (N=151, cohort 2) were immediately tested at the same OSCE stations as cohort 1, and were provided with feedback and teaching. Cohort 2 was then retested at the OSCE station in early 2017. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the performance of cohort 1 and cohort 2 on checklist items. In cohort 2, performance differences between the beginning and end of the intern year were compared using the McNemar chi-square test for paired nominal data.
Results
Checklist items were scored, summed, and reported as percent correct. In cohort 2, the mean percent correct was higher on the posttest than on the pretest (92% vs. 77%, P<0.0001), and the passing rate (100% correct) was also significantly higher on the posttest (55% vs. 16%). At the end of intern year, the mean percent correct was higher in cohort 2 than in cohort 1 (95% vs. 90%, P<0.0001), and 55% of cohort 2 passed (a perfect score) compared to 24% in cohort 1 (P<0.0001).
Conclusion
An OSCE can be utilized to evaluate and monitor hand hygiene and PPE proficiency among interns in the United States.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Virtual Reality Medical Training for COVID-19 Swab Testing and Proper Handling of Personal Protective Equipment: Development and Usability
    Paul Zikas, Steve Kateros, Nick Lydatakis, Mike Kentros, Efstratios Geronikolakis, Manos Kamarianakis, Giannis Evangelou, Ioanna Kartsonaki, Achilles Apostolou, Tanja Birrenbach, Aristomenis K. Exadaktylos, Thomas C. Sauter, George Papapagiannakis
    Frontiers in Virtual Reality.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness and Utility of Virtual Reality Simulation as an Educational Tool for Safe Performance of COVID-19 Diagnostics: Prospective, Randomized Pilot Trial
    Tanja Birrenbach, Josua Zbinden, George Papagiannakis, Aristomenis K Exadaktylos, Martin Müller, Wolf E Hautz, Thomas Christian Sauter
    JMIR Serious Games.2021; 9(4): e29586.     CrossRef
  • Rapid Dissemination of a COVID-19 Airway Management Simulation Using a Train-the-Trainers Curriculum
    William J. Peterson, Brendan W. Munzer, Ryan V. Tucker, Eve D. Losman, Carrie Harvey, Colman Hatton, Nana Sefa, Ben S. Bassin, Cindy H. Hsu
    Academic Medicine.2021; 96(10): 1414.     CrossRef
  • Empirical analysis comparing the tele-objective structured clinical examination and the in-person assessment in Australia
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 23.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of students' performance of objective structured clinical examination during clinical practice
    Jihye Yu, Sukyung Lee, Miran Kim, Janghoon Lee
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2020; 32(3): 231.     CrossRef
Dreyfus scale-based feedback increased medical students’ satisfaction with the complex cluster part of a interviewing and physical examination course and improved skills readiness in Taiwan  
Shiau-Shian Huang, Chia-Chang Huang, Ying-Ying Yang, Shuu-Jiun Wang, Boaz Shulruf, Chen-Huan Chen
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:30.   Published online October 11, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.30
  • 9,176 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
In contrast to the core part of the clinical interviewing and physical examination (PE) skills course, corresponding to the basic, head-to-toe, and thoracic systems, learners need structured feedback in the cluster part of the course, which includes the abdominal, neuromuscular, and musculoskeletal systems. This study evaluated the effects of using Dreyfus scale-based feedback, which has elements of continuous professional development, instead of Likert scale-based feedback in the cluster part of training in Taiwan.
Methods
Instructors and final-year medical students in the 2015–2016 classes of National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan comprised the regular cohort, whereas those in the 2017–2018 classes formed the intervention cohort. In the intervention cohort, Dreyfus scale-based feedback, rather than Likert scale-based feedback, was used in the cluster part of the course.
Results
In the cluster part of the course in the regular cohort, pre-trained standardized patients rated the class climate as poor, and students expressed low satisfaction with the instructors and course and low self-assessed readiness. In comparison with the regular cohort, improved end-of-course group objective structured clinical examination scores after the cluster part were noted in the intervention cohort. In other words, the implementation of Dreyfus scale-based feedback in the intervention cohort for the cluster part improved the deficit in this section of the course.
Conclusion
The implementation of Dreyfus scale-based feedback helped instructors to create a good class climate in the cluster part of the clinical interviewing and PE skills course. Simultaneously, this new intervention achieved the goal of promoting medical students’ readiness for interviewing, PE, and self-directed learning.
Peer-assisted feedback: a successful approach for providing feedback on United States Medical Licensing Exam-style clinical skills exam notes in the United States  
Kira Nagoshi, Zareen Zaidi, Ashleigh Wright, Carolyn Stalvey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:29.   Published online October 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.29
  • 8,496 View
  • 116 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Peer-assisted learning (PAL) promotes the development of communication, facilitates improvements in clinical skills, and is a way to provide feedback to learners. We utilized PAL as a conceptual framework to explore the feasibility of peer-assisted feedback (PAF) to improve note-writing skills without requiring faculty time. The aim was to assess whether PAL was a successful method to provide feedback on the United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE)-style clinical skills exam notes by using student feedback on a survey in the United States.
Methods
The University of Florida College of Medicine administers clinical skills examination (CSEs) that include USMLE-like note-writing. PAL, in which students support the learning of their peers, was utilized as an alternative to faculty feedback. Second-year (MS2) and third-year (MS3) medical students taking CSEs participated in faculty-run note-grading sessions immediately after testing, which included explanations of grading rubrics and the feedback process. Students graded an anonymized peer’s notes. The graded material was then forwarded anonymously to its student author to review. Students were surveyed on their perceived ability to provide feedback and the benefits derived from PAF using a Likert scale (1–6) and open-ended comments during the 2017–2018 academic year.
Results
Students felt generally positively about the activity, with mean scores for items related to educational value of 4.49 for MS2s and 5.11 for MS3s (out of 6). MS3s perceived peer feedback as constructive, felt that evaluating each other’s notes was beneficial, and felt that the exercise would improve their future notes. While still positive, MS2 students gave lower scores than the MS3 students.
Conclusion
PAF was a successful method of providing feedback on student CSE notes, especially for MS3s. MS2s commented that although they learned during the process, they might be more invested in improving their note-writing as they approach their own USMLE exam.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Benefits of semiology taught using near-peer tutoring are sustainable
    Benjamin Gripay, Thomas André, Marie De Laval, Brice Peneau, Alexandre Secourgeon, Nicolas Lerolle, Cédric Annweiler, Grégoire Justeau, Laurent Connan, Ludovic Martin, Loïc Bière
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Teaching feedback skills to veterinary students by peer-assisted learning
    Aytaç ÜNSAL ADACA
    Ankara Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Goodness of fit of the items used in the 2nd cycle of evaluation and accreditation of medical schools by the Korea Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation based on the Rasch model  
Man Sup Lim, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:28.   Published online September 30, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.28
  • 8,527 View
  • 160 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Since 2004, the Korea Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation has been responsible for the evaluation and accreditation of medical schools in Korea. The 2nd cycle of evaluations was conducted from 2007 to 2011. The present study aimed at testing the goodness of fit of the items used in the 2nd cycle of evaluation and accreditation based on the Rasch model.
Methods
Dichotomous data on 40 medical schools were analyzed using Winsteps, a tool based on the Rasch model that includes goodness-of-fit testing.
Results
Two of the 109 items had an outfit mean square exceeding 2.0. The other 107 items showed a goodness of fit in the acceptable range for the outfit mean square. All items were in the acceptable range in terms of the infit mean square. Furthermore, 1 school had an outfit mean square exceeding 2.0, while all schools were in the acceptable range for the infit mean square. An outfit mean square value over 2.0 means that an item is a outlier. Therefore, 2 items showed an extreme response relative to the overall response. Meanwhile, the finding of an outfit mean square over 2.0 for 1 school means that it showed extraordinary responses to specific items, despite its excellent overall competency.
Conclusion
The goodness of fit of the items used for evaluation and accreditation by the Korea Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation should be checked so that they can be revised appropriately. Furthermore, the outlier school should be investigated to determine why it showed such an inappropriate goodness of fit.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Changes in the accreditation standards of medical schools by the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation from 2000 to 2019
    Hyo Hyun Yoo, Mi Kyung Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Keun Mi Lee, Jong Hun Lee, Seung-Jae Hong, Jung –Sik Huh, Won Kyun Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 2.     CrossRef
  • Status of the data sharing policies of scholarly journals published in Brazil, France, and Korea and listed in both the 2018 Scimago Journal and Country Ranking and the Web of Science
    Geum Hee Jeong
    Science Editing.2020; 7(2): 136.     CrossRef
  • Recent trends in medical journals’ data sharing policies and statements of data availability
    Sun Huh
    Archives of Plastic Surgery.2019; 46(06): 493.     CrossRef
Brief report
Higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career among Spanish-speaking physician assistant students after their volunteer work at a student-run free clinic in the United States  
Shannon Weaver, Zainub Hussaini, Virginia Lynn Valentin, Samin Panahi, Sarah Elizabeth Levitt, Jeanie Ashby, Akiko Kamimura
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:27.   Published online September 6, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.27
  • 22,102 View
  • 141 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Volunteering at a free clinic may influence career choice among health profession students. The purpose of this study was to explore knowledge, skills, attitudes, self-efficacy, interest in future work with the underserved, and interest in primary care among physician assistant (PA) students through an analysis of demographic characteristics of PA students at a student-run free clinic in the United States. Data were collected from 56 PA students through a quantitative survey in October 2018 after their participation at a student-run free clinic in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the intermountain west region of the USA. Out of the 3 sub-scales (attitudes, effect, and readiness), students responded most positively to items exploring the effect of their experiences of volunteering at the free clinic. Students who spoke Spanish showed higher levels of self-efficacy and readiness for a future career than non-Spanish speakers.

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions