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Volume 15; 2018
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Editorials
Updates from 2018: Being indexed in Embase, becoming an affiliated journal of the World Federation for Medical Education, implementing an optional open data policy, adopting principles of transparency and best practice in scholarly publishing, and appreciation to reviewers
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:36.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.36
  • 15,521 View
  • 155 Download
  • 6 Citations
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  • Position of Ultrasonography in the scholarly journal network based on bibliometrics and developmental strategies for it to become a top-tier journal
    Sun Huh
    Ultrasonography.2020; 39(3): 238.     CrossRef
  • How Annals of Dermatology Has Improved the Scientific Quality and Ethical Standards of its Articles in the Two-Year Period since October 2018
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Dermatology.2020; 32(5): 353.     CrossRef
  • Special reviews on the history and future of the Korean Institute of Medical Education and Evaluation to memorialize its collaboration with the Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute to designate JEEHP as a co-official journal
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 33.     CrossRef
  • Is it possible to foster first-rate publishers through a journal publishing cooperative in Korea?
    Sun Huh
    Archives of Plastic Surgery.2019; 46(01): 3.     CrossRef
  • Protection of Personal Information in Medical Journal Publications
    Sun Huh
    Neurointervention.2019; 14(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Journal statistics, coping strategy with upcoming scholarly journal publishing environment including Plan-S, and appreciation for reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 41.     CrossRef
Bibliometric and content analysis of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2018
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:35.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.35
  • 15,889 View
  • 154 Download
  • 1 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

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  • Promotion to Top-Tier Journal and Development Strategy of the Annals of Laboratory Medicine for Strengthening its Leadership in the Medical Laboratory Technology Category: A Bibliometric Study
    Sun Huh
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2022; 42(3): 321.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors predictive of performance in a doctor of physical therapy program in the United States  
Maureen Conard, Kristin Schweizer
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:34.   Published online December 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.34
  • 17,588 View
  • 235 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study aimed to conduct a personality-oriented job analysis to identify non-cognitive factors that may predict successful performance or performance difficulties in doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students. The study employed focus groups and a survey with 9 DPT subject matter experts. The focus group participants, who included 3 DPT faculty members and 4 recent graduates of the DPT program, identified 22 non-cognitive factors. Fifteen of these factors were thought to be possibly associated with successful performance and 7 factors were thought to be possibly associated with performance difficulties. Administration of a questionnaire employing the combination job analysis method resulted in 12 factors that could be used in selection, and 10 that could be incorporated into training. The present study employed an established job analysis method using subject matter experts to identify a broad array of factors that go beyond what previous studies have examined, and which may predict success or difficulties in a DPT program.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The relationship of non-cognitive factors to academic and clinical performance in graduate rehabilitation science students in the United States: a systematic review
    Kelly Reynolds, Caroline Bazemore, Cannon Hanebuth, Steph Hendren, Maggie Horn
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 31.     CrossRef
Research articles
The relationship of examinees’ individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of smart device-based testing to test scores on the practice test of the Korea Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination  
Eun Young Lim, Mi Kyoung Yim, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:33.   Published online December 27, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.33
  • 17,821 View
  • 224 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Smart device-based testing (SBT) is being introduced into the Republic of Korea’s high-stakes examination system, starting with the Korean Emergency Medicine Technician Licensing Examination (KEMTLE) in December 2017. In order to minimize the effects of variation in examinees’ environment on test scores, this study aimed to identify any associations of variables related to examinees’ individual characteristics and their perceived acceptability of SBT with their SBT practice test scores.
Methods
Of the 569 candidate students who took the KEMTLE on September 12, 2015, 560 responded to a survey questionnaire on the acceptability of SBT after the examination. The questionnaire addressed 8 individual characteristics and contained 2 satisfaction, 9 convenience, and 9 preference items. A comparative analysis according to individual variables was performed. Furthermore, a generalized linear model (GLM) analysis was conducted to identify the effects of individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT on test scores.
Results
Among those who preferred SBT over paper-and-pencil testing, test scores were higher for male participants (mean± standard deviation [SD], 4.36± 0.72) than for female participants (mean± SD, 4.21± 0.73). According to the GLM, no variables evaluated— including gender and experience with computer-based testing, SBT, or using a tablet PC—showed a statistically significant relationship with the total score, scores on multimedia items, or scores on text items.
Conclusion
Individual characteristics and perceived acceptability of SBT did not affect the SBT practice test scores of emergency medicine technician students in Korea. It should be possible to adopt SBT for the KEMTLE without interference from the variables examined in this study.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Student Satisfaction with Ubiquitous-Based Tests in Women’s Health Nursing Course
    Mi-Young An, Yun-Mi Kim
    Healthcare.2021; 9(12): 1664.     CrossRef
Comparison of standard-setting methods for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination: Angoff, Ebel, bookmark, and Hofstee  
Janghee Park, Duck-Sun Ahn, Mi Kyoung Yim, Jaehyoung Lee
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:32.   Published online December 26, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.32
  • 17,495 View
  • 213 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to compare the possible standard-setting methods for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination, which has a fixed cut score, and to suggest the most appropriate method.
Methods
Six radiological technology professors set standards for 250 items on the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination administered in December 2016 using the Angoff, Ebel, bookmark, and Hofstee methods.
Results
With a maximum percentile score of 100, the cut score for the examination was 71.27 using the Angoff method, 62.2 using the Ebel method, 64.49 using the bookmark method, and 62 using the Hofstee method. Based on the Hofstee method, an acceptable cut score for the examination would be between 52.83 and 70, but the cut score was 71.27 using the Angoff method.
Conclusion
The above results suggest that the best standard-setting method to determine the cut score would be a panel discussion with the modified Angoff or Ebel method, with verification of the rated results by the Hofstee method. Since no standard-setting method has yet been adopted for the Korean Radiological Technologist Licensing Examination, this study will be able to provide practical guidance for introducing a standard-setting process.

Citations

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  • The challenges inherent with anchor-based approaches to the interpretation of important change in clinical outcome assessments
    Kathleen W. Wyrwich, Geoffrey R. Norman
    Quality of Life Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Possibility of independent use of the yes/no Angoff and Hofstee methods for the standard setting of the Korean Medical Licensing Examination written test: a descriptive study
    Do-Hwan Kim, Ye Ji Kang, Hoon-Ki Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 33.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the validity of bookmark and Angoff standard setting methods in medical performance tests
    Majid Yousefi Afrashteh
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparing the cut score for the borderline group method and borderline regression method with norm-referenced standard setting in an objective structured clinical examination in medical school in Korea
    Song Yi Park, Sang-Hwa Lee, Min-Jeong Kim, Ki-Hwan Ji, Ji Ho Ryu
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 25.     CrossRef
  • Using the Angoff method to set a standard on mock exams for the Korean Nursing Licensing Examination
    Mi Kyoung Yim, Sujin Shin
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 14.     CrossRef
  • Performance of the Ebel standard-setting method for the spring 2019 Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada internal medicine certification examination consisting of multiple-choice questions
    Jimmy Bourque, Haley Skinner, Jonathan Dupré, Maria Bacchus, Martha Ainslie, Irene W. Y. Ma, Gary Cole
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 12.     CrossRef
  • Similarity of the cut score in test sets with different item amounts using the modified Angoff, modified Ebel, and Hofstee standard-setting methods for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination
    Janghee Park, Mi Kyoung Yim, Na Jin Kim, Duck Sun Ahn, Young-Min Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 28.     CrossRef
An innovative resident-driven mortality case review curriculum to teach and drive system-based practice improvements in the United States  
Nila S. Radhakrishnan, Margaret C. Lo, Rohit Bishnoi, Subhankar Samal, Robert Leverence, Eric Rosenberg, Zareen Zaidi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:31.   Published online December 26, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.31
  • 18,381 View
  • 254 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Traditionally, the morbidity and mortality conference (M&MC) is a forum where possible medical errors are discussed. Although M&MCs can facilitate identification of opportunities for systemwide improvements, few studies have described their use for this purpose, particularly in residency training programs. This paper describes the use of M&MC case review as a quality improvement activity that teaches system-based practice and can engage residents in improving systems of care.
Methods
Internal medicine residents at a tertiary care academic medical center reviewed 347 consecutive mortalities from March 2014 to September 2017. The residents used case review worksheets to categorize and track causes of mortality, and then debriefed with a faculty member. Selected cases were then presented at a larger interdepartmental meeting and action items were implemented. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were used to analyze the results.
Results
The residents identified a possible diagnostic mismatch at some point from admission to death in 54.5% of cases (n= 189) and a possible need for improved management in 48.0% of cases. Three possible management failure themes were identified, including failure to plan, failure to communicate, and failure to rescue, which accounted for 21.9%, 10.7 %, and 10.1% of cases, respectively. Following these reviews, quality improvement initiatives proposed by residents led to system-based changes.
Conclusion
A resident-driven mortality review curriculum can lead to improvements in systems of care. This novel type of curriculum can be used to teach system-based practice. The recruitment of teaching faculty with expertise in quality improvement and mortality case analyses is essential for such a project.
Brief Report
Integrated clinical experience with concurrent problem-based learning is associated with improved clinical reasoning among physical therapy students in the United States  
Brad Warren Willis, Anita Sethi Campbell, Stephen Paul Sayers, Kyle Gibson
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:30.   Published online December 25, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.30
  • 18,233 View
  • 370 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Clinical reasoning (CR) is a key learning domain for physical therapy educators and a core skill for entry-level practitioners. Integrated clinical experience (ICE) and problem-based learning (PBL) have each been reported to improve interpersonal and social domains, while promoting knowledge acquisition and CR. Unfortunately, studies monitoring CR during ICE with concurrent PBL in physical therapy education are sparse. We hypothesized that ICE with concurrent PBL would be associated with improved self-reported CR in third-year student physical therapists (PTs) in the United States. The Self-Assessment of Clinical Reflection and Reasoning (SACRR) survey was administered to 42 student PTs at the beginning and end of their third and final year of didactic training. Between the pretest and posttest analyses, the participants completed faculty-led ICE and PBL coursework for 16 weeks. The overall SACRR score and 26 individual item scores were examined. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test and paired t-test were used, with statistical significance accepted at P< 0.05. Significant improvements were observed in the overall SACRR score (P< 0.001), including 6 of the 26 survey items centered around decision-making based on experience and evidence, as well as self-reflection and reasoning. ICE with PBL was associated with improved self-assessed CR and reflection in third-year student PTs in the United States. Monitoring the impact of curricular design on CR may improve educators’ ability to enhance cognitive and psychomotor skills, which underscores the importance of increasing the explicit use of theoretical frameworks and teaching techniques for coping with uncertainty as a way of enhancing entry-level training.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Renovación metodológica y evaluación como plataforma para el desarrollo de competencias de razonamiento profesional
    Máximo Escobar Cabello, Iván Sánchez Soto
    Investigación en Educación Médica.2020; (34): 76.     CrossRef
Research articles
The effects of an empathy role-playing program for operating room nursing students in Iran  
Negin Larti, Elaheh Ashouri, Akram Aarabi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:29.   Published online December 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.29
  • 24,081 View
  • 426 Download
  • 17 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a role-playing training program conducted among operating room nursing students on empathetic communication with patients through measurements of empathy scores.
Methods
This study was carried out among 77 operating room nursing students from the first to the fourth years studying at the School of Nursing and Midwifery of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in the academic year 2017–2018. The intervention administered to the experimental group included a 12-hour training program on expressing empathy to patients that incorporated roleplaying. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Student version was completed by the participants before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. A comparative analysis of these 3 time points was conducted.
Results
No significant difference was found in the total pre-intervention mean empathy scores before the intervention between the control group and the experimental group (P= 0.50). However, the total mean empathy scores in the experimental group immediately after and 1 month after the intervention were higher than those in the control group (P< 0.001).
Conclusion
Empathy training through a role-playing technique was effective at improving the empathy scores of operating room nursing students, and this finding also underscores the fact that empathy can be promoted by education. Changing the educational curriculum of operating room nursing students is suggested in order to familiarize them with the concept of empathy in the operating room.

Citations

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    Lisa Powell, Nicholas McGuigan
    Meditari Accountancy Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Maryam Bastami, Behzad Imani, Moghadari Koosha
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2022; 11(4): 1282.     CrossRef
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    Leina Bian, Jianhua Li, Wang Li, Xiaoyan Hu, Ming Dai, Yuvaraja Teekaraman
    Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
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    Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
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    Pablo-Jesús Marín-García, Lola Llobat
    Education Sciences.2022; 12(7): 476.     CrossRef
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    Qinghua Wang, Xiaohong Cao, Tianjiao Du
    BMC Nursing.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Joelle Yan Xin Chua, Emily Ang, Siew Tiang Lydia Lau, Shefaly Shorey
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 104: 105000.     CrossRef
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    S. I. Chistyakov, A. Yu. Smorkalov, O. V. Gorokh, A. A. Pevnev
    Virtual Technologies in Medicine.2021; (1): 26.     CrossRef
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    Ellen E. Lee, Tushara Govind, Marina Ramsey, Tsung Chin Wu, Rebecca Daly, Jinyuan Liu, Xin M. Tu, Martin P. Paulus, Michael L. Thomas, Dilip V. Jeste
    Translational Psychiatry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Arzu Kul Uçtu, Nazan Karahan
    European Journal of Midwifery.2021; 5(September): 1.     CrossRef
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    Eugenia Smirna González-Díaz, María Guadalupe Silva-Vetri, Patricia Díaz-Calzadilla, Aracelis Calzadilla-Núñez, Alejandro Reyes-Reyes, Víctor Patricio Díaz-Narváez
    Revista de la Facultad de Medicina.2021; 69(4): e86227.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of Randomized Clinical Trials of Interventions to Enhance Social, Emotional, and Spiritual Components of Wisdom
    Ellen E. Lee, Katherine J. Bangen, Julie A. Avanzino, BaiChun Hou, Marina Ramsey, Graham Eglit, Jinyuan Liu, Xin M. Tu, Martin Paulus, Dilip V. Jeste
    JAMA Psychiatry.2020; 77(9): 925.     CrossRef
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    Tahani Casameni Montiel, Andrea Ancer Leal, Nicole Baltazar
    Nursing.2020; 50(7): 61.     CrossRef
  • Comparing Empathy Levels in Doctor of Pharmacy Students and Exemplary Pharmacist Preceptors
    Charlene R. Williams, Philip T. Rodgers, Jacqueline E. McLaughlin, Thomas A. Angelo, Greene Shepherd
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2020; 84(3): 7497.     CrossRef
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    Rachel Winter, Eyad Issa, Nia Roberts, Robert I Norman, Jeremy Howick
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(9): e036471.     CrossRef
  • Effects of an Educational Film About Body Donors on Students' Empathy and Anxiety Levels in Gross Anatomy
    Julia Iaconisi, Friederike Hasselblatt, Benjamin Mayer, Michael Schoen, Tobias Maria Böckers, Anja Böckers
    Anatomical Sciences Education.2019; 12(4): 386.     CrossRef
Comparison of the level of cognitive processing between case-based items and non-case-based items on the Interuniversity Progress Test of Medicine in the Netherlands  
Dario Cecilio-Fernandes, Wouter Kerdijk, Andreas Johannes Bremers, Wytze Aalders, René Anton Tio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:28.   Published online December 12, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.28
  • 17,790 View
  • 186 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
It is assumed that case-based questions require higher-order cognitive processing, whereas questions that are not case-based require lower-order cognitive processing. In this study, we investigated to what extent case-based and non-case-based questions followed this assumption based on Bloom’s taxonomy.
Methods
In this article, 4,800 questions from the Interuniversity Progress Test of Medicine were classified based on whether they were case-based and on the level of Bloom’s taxonomy that they involved. Lower-order questions require students to remember or/and have a basic understanding of knowledge. Higher-order questions require students to apply, analyze, or/and evaluate. The phi coefficient was calculated to investigate the relationship between whether questions were case-based and the required level of cognitive processing.
Results
Our results demonstrated that 98.1% of case-based questions required higher-level cognitive processing. Of the non-case-based questions, 33.7% required higher-level cognitive processing. The phi coefficient demonstrated a significant, but moderate correlation between the presence of a patient case in a question and its required level of cognitive processing (phi coefficient= 0.55, P< 0.001).
Conclusion
Medical instructors should be aware of the association between item format (case-based versus non-case-based) and the cognitive processes they elicit in order to meet the desired balance in a test, taking the learning objectives and the test difficulty into account.

Citations

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  • What faculty write versus what students see? Perspectives on multiple-choice questions using Bloom’s taxonomy
    Seetha U. Monrad, Nikki L. Bibler Zaidi, Karri L. Grob, Joshua B. Kurtz, Andrew W. Tai, Michael Hortsch, Larry D. Gruppen, Sally A. Santen
    Medical Teacher.2021; 43(5): 575.     CrossRef
  • Aménagement du concours de première année commune aux études de santé (PACES) : entre justice sociale et éthique confraternelle en devenir ?
    R. Pougnet, L. Pougnet
    Éthique & Santé.2020; 17(4): 250.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge of dental faculty in gulf cooperation council states of multiple-choice questions’ item writing flaws
    Mawlood Kowash, Hazza Alhobeira, Iyad Hussein, Manal Al Halabi, Saif Khan
    Medical Education Online.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Corrigendum
Funding information of the article entitled “Post-hoc simulation study of computerized adaptive testing for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination”
Dong Gi Seo, Jeongwook Choi
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:27.   Published online December 4, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.27    [Epub ahead of print]
Corrects: J Educ Eval Health Prof 2018;15(0):14
  • 16,418 View
  • 165 Download
PDF
Research article
Linear programming method to construct equated item sets for the implementation of periodical computer-based testing for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination  
Dong Gi Seo, Myeong Gi Kim, Na Hui Kim, Hye Sook Shin, Hyun Jung Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:26.   Published online October 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.26
  • 19,553 View
  • 272 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to identify the best way of developing equivalent item sets and to propose a stable and effective management plan for periodical licensing examinations.
Methods
Five pre-equated item sets were developed based on the predicted correct answer rate of each item using linear programming. These pre-equated item sets were compared to the ones that were developed with a random item selection method based on the actual correct answer rate (ACAR) and difficulty from item response theory (IRT). The results with and without common items were also compared in the same way. ACAR and the IRT difficulty were used to determine whether there was a significant difference between the pre-equating conditions.
Results
There was a statistically significant difference in IRT difficulty among the results from different pre-equated conditions. The predicted correct answer rate was divided using 2 or 3 difficulty categories, and the ACAR and IRT difficulty parameters of the 5 item sets were equally constructed. Comparing the item set conditions with and without common items, including common items did not make a significant contribution to the equating of the 5 item sets.
Conclusion
This study suggested that the linear programming method is applicable to construct equated-item sets that reflect each content area. The suggested best method to construct equated item sets is to divide the predicted correct answer rate using 2 or 3 difficulty categories, regardless of common items. If pre-equated item sets are required to construct a test based on the actual data, several methods should be considered by simulation studies to determine which is optimal before administering a real test.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Reading Comprehension Tests for Children: Test Equating and Specific Age-Interval Reports
    Patrícia Silva Lúcio, Fausto Coutinho Lourenço, Hugo Cogo-Moreira, Deborah Bandalos, Carolina Alves Ferreira de Carvalho, Adriana de Souza Batista Kida, Clara Regina Brandão de Ávila
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Brief report
Benefits of focus group discussions beyond online surveys in course evaluations by medical students in the United States: a qualitative study  
Katharina Brandl, Soniya V. Rabadia, Alexander Chang, Jess Mandel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:25.   Published online October 16, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.25
  • 21,055 View
  • 304 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
In addition to online questionnaires, many medical schools use supplemental evaluation tools such as focus groups to evaluate their courses. Although some benefits of using focus groups in program evaluation have been described, it is unknown whether these inperson data collection methods provide sufficient additional information beyond online evaluations to justify them. In this study, we analyze recommendations gathered from student evaluation team (SET) focus group meetings and analyzed whether these items were captured in open-ended comments within the online evaluations. Our results indicate that online evaluations captured only 49% of the recommendations identified via SETs. Surveys to course directors identified that 74% of the recommendations exclusively identified via the SETs were implemented within their courses. Our results indicate that SET meetings provided information not easily captured in online evaluations and that these recommendations resulted in actual course changes.

Citations

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  • Student evaluations of teaching and the development of a comprehensive measure of teaching effectiveness for medical schools
    Constantina Constantinou, Marjo Wijnen-Meijer
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Daniel T. L. Shek, Xiaoqin Zhu, Diya Dou, Xiang Li
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 20(1): 553.     CrossRef
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    Wendy A. Hall, Sarah Liva
    Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning.2021; 29(1): 6.     CrossRef
Case report
Dental students’ learning attitudes and perceptions of YouTube as a lecture video hosting platform in a flipped classroom in Korea  
Chang Wan Seo, A Ra Cho, Jung Chul Park, Hag Yeon Cho, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:24.   Published online October 11, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.24
  • 26,564 View
  • 363 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to confirm the applicability of YouTube as a delivery platform of lecture videos for dental students and to assess their learning attitudes towards the flipped classroom model.
Methods
Learning experiences after using the YouTube platform to deliver preliminary video lectures in a flipped classroom were assessed by 69 second-year students (52 males, 17 females) at Dankook University College of Dentistry, Korea, who attended periodontology lectures during 2 consecutive semesters of the 2016 academic year. The instructor uploaded the lecture videos to YouTube before each class. At the end of the second semester, the students were surveyed using a questionnaire devised by the authors.
Results
Of the students, 53 (76.8%) always watched the lecture before the class, 48 (69.6%) used their smartphones, and 66 (95.7%) stated that they watched the lectures at home. The majority of the students replied that the video lectures were easier to understand than face to face lectures (82.6%) and that they would like to view the videos again after graduation (73.9%).
Conclusion
Our results indicate that YouTube is an applicable platform to deliver video lectures and to expose students to increased learning opportunities.

Citations

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    European Journal of Dental Education.2022; 26(2): 302.     CrossRef
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    Zhonggen Yu, Mingle Gao
    SAGE Open.2022; 12(1): 215824402110684.     CrossRef
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    Syed Rashid Habib, Aleshba Saba Khan, Mohsin Ali, Essam Abdulla Abutheraa, Ahmad khaled alkhrayef, Faisal Jibrin Aljibrin, Nawaf Saad Almutairi, Ammar A. Siddiqui
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Research articles
Agreement between 2 raters’ evaluations of a traditional prosthodontic practical exam integrated with directly observed procedural skills in Egypt  
Ahmed Khalifa Khalifa, Salah Hegazy
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:23.   Published online September 27, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.23
  • 22,608 View
  • 194 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This study aimed to assess the agreement between 2 raters in evaluations of students on a prosthodontic clinical practical exam integrated with directly observed procedural skills (DOPS).
Methods
A sample of 76 students was monitored by 2 raters to evaluate the process and the final registered maxillomandibular relation for a completely edentulous patient at Mansoura Dental School, Egypt on a practical exam of bachelor’s students from May 15 to June 28, 2017. Each registered relation was evaluated from a total of 60 marks subdivided into 3 score categories: occlusal plane orientation (OPO), vertical dimension registration (VDR), and centric relation registration (CRR). The marks for each category included an assessment of DOPS. The marks of OPO and VDR for both raters were compared using the graph method to measure reliability through Bland and Altman analysis. The reliability of the CRR marks was evaluated by the Krippendorff alpha ratio.
Results
The results revealed highly similar marks between raters for OPO (mean= 18.1 for both raters), with close limits of agreement (0.73 and −0.78). For VDR, the mean marks were close (mean= 17.4 and 17.1 for examiners 1 and 2, respectively), with close limits of agreement (2.7 and −2.2). There was a strong correlation (Krippendorff alpha ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.79– 0.99) between the raters in the evaluation of CRR.
Conclusion
The 2 raters’ evaluation of a clinical traditional practical exam integrated with DOPS showed no significant differences in the evaluations of candidates at the end of a clinical prosthodontic course. The limits of agreement between raters could be optimized by excluding subjective evaluation parameters and complicated cases from the examination procedure.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • In‐person and virtual assessment of oral radiology skills and competences by the Objective Structured Clinical Examination
    Fernanda R. Porto, Mateus A. Ribeiro, Luciano A. Ferreira, Rodrigo G. Oliveira, Karina L. Devito
    Journal of Dental Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Learning through multiple lenses: analysis of self, peer, nearpeer, and faculty assessments of a clinical history-taking task in Australia  
Kylie Fitzgerald, Brett Vaughan
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:22.   Published online September 18, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.22
  • 22,058 View
  • 269 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Peer assessment provides a framework for developing expected skills and receiving feedback appropriate to the learner’s level. Near-peer (NP) assessment may elevate expectations and motivate learning. Feedback from peers and NPs may be a sustainable way to enhance student assessment feedback. This study analysed relationships among self, peer, NP, and faculty marking of an assessment and students’ attitudes towards marking by those various groups.
Methods
A cross-sectional study design was used. Year 2 osteopathy students (n= 86) were invited to perform self and peer assessments of a clinical history-taking and communication skills assessment. NPs and faculty also marked the assessment. Year 2 students also completed a questionnaire on their attitudes to peer/NP marking. Descriptive statistics and the Spearman rho coefficient were used to evaluate relationships across marker groups.
Results
Year 2 students (n= 9), NPs (n= 3), and faculty (n= 5) were recruited. Correlations between self and peer (r= 0.38) and self and faculty (r= 0.43) marks were moderate. A weak correlation was observed between self and NP marks (r= 0.25). Perceptions of peer and NP marking varied, with over half of the cohort suggesting that peer or NP assessments should not contribute to their grade.
Conclusion
Framing peer and NP assessment as another feedback source may offer a sustainable method for enhancing feedback without overloading faculty resources. Multiple sources of feedback may assist in developing assessment literacy and calibrating students’ self-assessment capability. The small number of students recruited suggests some acceptability of peer and NP assessment; however, further work is required to increase its acceptability.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • History-taking level and its influencing factors among nursing undergraduates based on the virtual standardized patient testing results: Cross sectional study
    Jingrong Du, Xiaowen Zhu, Juan Wang, Jing Zheng, Xiaomin Zhang, Ziwen Wang, Kun Li
    Nurse Education Today.2022; 111: 105312.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions