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Volume 14; 2017
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Editorials
Establishment of an open data policy for Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, appreciation for invited reviewers, and acknowledgement of volunteers who made audio recordings
Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:37.   Published online December 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.37
  • 23,606 View
  • 214 Download
  • 9 Citations
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  • Position of Ultrasonography in the scholarly journal network based on bibliometrics and developmental strategies for it to become a top-tier journal
    Sun Huh
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  • Current and planned adoption of data sharing policies by editors of Korean scholarly journals
    Soo Young Kim, Hyun Jung Yi, Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2019; 6(1): 19.     CrossRef
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    Sun Huh
    Archives of Plastic Surgery.2019; 46(06): 493.     CrossRef
  • How Asian publishers can compete with publishers in Europe and North America
    Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2018; 5(1): 73.     CrossRef
  • Journal metrics of Clinical and Molecular Hepatology based on the Web of Science Core Collection
    Sun Huh
    Clinical and Molecular Hepatology.2018; 24(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • How much progress has Blood Research made since the change of the journal title in 2013
    Sun Huh
    Blood Research.2018; 53(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • Latest trends in innovative global scholarly journal publication and distribution platforms
    Soon Kim, Eunkyung Chung, Jae Yun Lee
    Science Editing.2018; 5(2): 100.     CrossRef
  • Journal Metrics of Infection & Chemotherapy and Current Scholarly Journal Publication Issues
    Sun Huh
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2018; 50(3): 219.     CrossRef
  • Updates from 2018: Being indexed in Embase, becoming an affiliated journal of the World Federation for Medical Education, implementing an optional open data policy, adopting principles of transparency and best practice in scholarly publishing, and appreci
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 36.     CrossRef
Interesting statistics regarding the papers published in Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2017
Yera Hur
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:36.   Published online December 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.36
  • 21,613 View
  • 210 Download
  • 1 Citations
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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bibliometric and content analysis of Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2018
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 35.     CrossRef
Research articles
Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats analysis of integrating the World Health Organization patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan: a qualitative case study  
Samreen Misbah, Usman Mahboob
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:35.   Published online December 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.35
  • 42,105 View
  • 430 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to conduct a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of integrating the World Health Organization (WHO) patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education in Pakistan.
Methods
A qualitative interpretive case study was conducted at Riphah International University, Islamabad, from October 2016 to June 2017. The study included 9 faculty members and 1 expert on patient safety. The interviews were audiotaped, and a thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed using NVivo software.
Results
Four themes were derived based on the need analysis model. The sub-themes derived from the collected data were arranged under the themes of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, in accordance with the principles of SWOT analysis. The strengths identified were the need for a formal patient safety curriculum and its early integration into the undergraduate program. The weaknesses were faculty awareness and participation in development programs. The opportunities were an ongoing effort to develop an appropriate curriculum, to improve the current culture of healthcare, and to use the WHO curricular resource guide. The threats were attitudes towards patient safety in Pakistani culture, resistance to implementation from different levels, and the role of regulatory authorities.
Conclusion
The theme of patient safety needs to be incorporated early into the formal medical education curriculum, with the main goals of striving to do no harm and seeing mistakes as opportunities to learn. Faculty development activities need to be organized, and faculty members should to be encouraged to participate in them. The lack of a patient safety culture was identified as the primary reason for resistance to this initiative at many levels. The WHO curriculum, amended according to local institutional culture, can be implemented appropriately with support from the corresponding regulatory bodies.

Citations

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  • Explanation of Evolving Health Technical and Vocational Education and Training System: A National Experience
    Soleiman Ahmady, Sara Shahbazi
    Journal of Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Work Safety on Organizational Social Sustainability Improvement in the Healthcare Sector: The Case of a Public Sector Hospital in Pakistan
    Zia Ullah, Mohammed Ali Bait Ali Sulaiman, Syed Babar Ali, Naveed Ahmad, Miklas Scholz, Heesup Han
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(12): 6672.     CrossRef
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    Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research.2021; 12(1): 56.     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5805.     CrossRef
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    Ali Maher, Ali Ayoubian, Sima Rafiei, Donya Sheibani Tehrani, Farnaz Mostofian, Pooneh Mazyar
    International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance.2019; 32(8): 1113.     CrossRef
The sights and insights of examiners in objective structured clinical examinations  
Lauren Chong, Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Barbara-Ann Adelstein, Boaz Shulruf
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:34.   Published online December 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.34
  • 29,066 View
  • 370 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is considered to be one of the most robust methods of clinical assessment. One of its strengths lies in its ability to minimise the effects of examiner bias due to the standardisation of items and tasks for each candidate. However, OSCE examiners’ assessment scores are influenced by several factors that may jeopardise the assumed objectivity of OSCEs. To better understand this phenomenon, the current review aims to determine and describe important sources of examiner bias and the factors affecting examiners’ assessments.
Methods
We performed a narrative review of the medical literature using Medline. All articles meeting the selection criteria were reviewed, with salient points extracted and synthesised into a clear and comprehensive summary of the knowledge in this area.
Results
OSCE examiners’ assessment scores are influenced by factors belonging to 4 different domains: examination context, examinee characteristics, examinee-examiner interactions, and examiner characteristics. These domains are composed of several factors including halo, hawk/dove and OSCE contrast effects; the examiner’s gender and ethnicity; training; lifetime experience in assessing; leadership and familiarity with students; station type; and site effects.
Conclusion
Several factors may influence the presumed objectivity of examiners’ assessments, and these factors need to be addressed to ensure the objectivity of OSCEs. We offer insights into directions for future research to better understand and address the phenomenon of examiner bias.

Citations

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    Mohamed Guled, Juned Islam, Haseeb Qureshi
    Medical Teacher.2022; 44(1): 101.     CrossRef
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    Jr-Wei Wu, Hao-Min Cheng, Shiau-Shian Huang, Jen-Feng Liang, Chia-Chang Huang, Ling-Yu Yang, Boaz Shulruf, Ying-Ying Yang, Chen-Huan Chen, Ming-Chih Hou, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
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    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Asser Sallam, Hani Atwa, Adel Abdelaziz, Asmaa Abdel Nasser
    Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health.2022; 22(1): 29.     CrossRef
  • Using Think-aloud Interviews to Examine a Clinically Oriented Performance Assessment Rubric
    Mary Roduta Roberts, Chad M. Gotch, Megan Cook, Karin Werther, Iris C. I. Chao
    Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives.2022; 20(3): 139.     CrossRef
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    Nazdar Alkhateeb, Abubakir Majeed Salih, Nazar Shabila, Ali Al-Dabbagh, Ayse Hilal Bati
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(9): e0274055.     CrossRef
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    Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, Laura Baecher-Lind, Camille A. Clare, B. Star Hampton, Michael D. Moxley, Dotun Ogunyemi, Archana A. Pradhan, Shireen M. Madani Sims, Sara Whetstone, Mark B. Woodland, Nadine T. Katz
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    Jr-Wei Wu, Hao-Min Cheng, Shiau-Shian Huang, Jen-Feng Liang, Chia-Chang Huang, Boaz Shulruf, Ying-Ying Yang, Chen-Huan Chen, Ming-Chih Hou, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
    Journal of the Chinese Medical Association.2022; 85(9): 909.     CrossRef
  • Augmenting physician examiner scoring in objective structured clinical examinations: including the standardized patient perspective
    Marguerite Roy, Josée Wojcik, Ilona Bartman, Sydney Smee
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2021; 26(1): 313.     CrossRef
  • Re-conceptualising and accounting for examiner (cut-score) stringency in a ‘high frequency, small cohort’ performance test
    Matt Homer
    Advances in Health Sciences Education.2021; 26(2): 369.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the validity of bookmark and Angoff standard setting methods in medical performance tests
    Majid Yousefi Afrashteh
    BMC Medical Education.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Examiners’ decision‐making processes in observation‐based clinical examinations
    Bunmi S. Malau‐Aduli, Richard B. Hays, Karen D’Souza, Amy M. Smith, Karina Jones, Richard Turner, Lizzi Shires, Jane Smith, Shannon Saad, Cassandra Richmond, Antonio Celenza, Tarun Sen Gupta
    Medical Education.2021; 55(3): 344.     CrossRef
  • Tutor–Student Partnership in Practice OSCE to Enhance Medical Education
    Eve Cosker, Valentin Favier, Patrice Gallet, Francis Raphael, Emmanuelle Moussier, Louise Tyvaert, Marc Braun, Eva Feigerlova
    Medical Science Educator.2021; 31(6): 1803.     CrossRef
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    Henok Fisseha, Hailemichael Desalegn
    Advances in Medical Education and Practice.2021; Volume 12: 1439.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on the Learning Outcomes of Medical Students in Taiwan: A Two-Year Prospective Cohort Study of OSCE Performance
    Tzyy-Yurn Tzeng, Chia-An Hsu, Ying-Ying Yang, Eunice J. Yuan, Ya-Ting Chang, Tzu-Hao Li, Chung-Pin Li, Jen-Feng Liang, Jiing-Feng Lirng, Tzeng-Ji Chen, Chia-Chang Huang, Ming-Chih Hou, Chen-Huan Chen, Wayne Huey-Herng Sheu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 19(1): 208.     CrossRef
  • Assessment methods and the validity and reliability of measurement tools in online objective structured clinical examinations: a systematic scoping review
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 11.     CrossRef
  • Versatility in multiple mini-interview implementation: Rater background does not significantly influence assessment scoring
    Keith D. Baker, Roy T. Sabo, Meagan Rawls, Moshe Feldman, Sally A. Santen
    Medical Teacher.2020; 42(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Qualifying online assessment during COVID-19 pandemic: Reflecting on our experience under the cognitive lens of Miller’s pyramid
    Dinesh Kumar, Rajasekhar Sajja SN
    Research and Development in Medical Education.2020; 9(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the effects of simulated patient clinical skill training and student roleplay on objective structured clinical examination performance among medical students in Australia
    Silas Taylor, Matthew Haywood, Boaz Shulruf
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2019; 16: 3.     CrossRef
  • Insights into student assessment outcomes in rural clinical campuses
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    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Clinical empathy in medical students in India measured using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy–Student Version  
Anirban Chatterjee, Rajkrishna Ravikumar, Satendra Singh, Pranjal Singh Chauhan, Manu Goel
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:33.   Published online December 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.33
  • 31,294 View
  • 399 Download
  • 20 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical empathy of a cohort of medical students spanning 4 years of undergraduate study and to identify factors associated with empathy.
Methods
A cross-sectional study to assess the empathy of undergraduate medical students at the University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital in Delhi, India, was conducted using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy–Student Version. Demographic data were obtained using a pre-tested, semi-open-ended questionnaire.
Results
Of the 600 students, 418 participated in the survey (69.7%). The mean empathy score was 96.01 (of a maximum of 140), with a standard deviation of 14.56. The empathy scores decreased from the first to the third semester, plateaued at the fifth semester, and rose again in the seventh semester. Empathy was found to be significantly associated with the gender of the participant, with females having higher scores (P<0.001). The age of the participant, place of residence, whose decision it was for the student to enroll in an MBBS (bachelor of medicine and bachelor of surgery) program, and the choice of future specialty were not significantly associated with students’ empathy scores.
Conclusion
The study found significant gender differences in empathy among the participants. The empathy scores tended to decline initially and then rebound over time. The mean empathy levels found in this study are lower than those reported in most similar studies around the world; therefore, further studies are needed to analyze and address the underlying factors associated with this discrepancy.

Citations

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    Hyoung Seok Shin, Hyunmi Park, Young-Mee Lee
    Patient Education and Counseling.2022; 105(2): 432.     CrossRef
  • Empathy, personality traits, and emotional management in 2nd and 4th-year dentistry students: a single-center study
    Christian Lermen, Willi Wetzel, Vanessa Britz, Jasmina Sterz, Wolf O Bechstein, Teresa Schreckenbach
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Gayatri Bhatia, Jyoti V. Shetty
    Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine.2022; : 025371762211046.     CrossRef
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    The National Medical Journal of India.2022; 35: 100.     CrossRef
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    Educación Médica.2022; 23(6): 100769.     CrossRef
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    P Mohan Kumar, D Praveen, G Praveen, P Arun Bhupathi, M Ravi Kanth, KS Uloopi
    Journal of Patient Experience.2021; 8: 237437352110565.     CrossRef
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    Kerstin M Palombaro, Jill D Black, Robin L Dole, Sidney A Jones, Alexander R Stewart
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    Ivana Brekalo Prso, Katarzyna Mocny‐Pachońska, Agata Trzcionka, Sonja Pezelj‐Ribaric, Ema Paljevic, Marta Tanasiewicz, Romana Persic Bukmir
    European Journal of Dental Education.2020; 24(4): 687.     CrossRef
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    Özge Akgün, Melahat Akdeniz, Ethem Kavukcu, Hasan Hüseyin Avcı
    Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development.2020; 7: 238212052094065.     CrossRef
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    Indian Pediatrics.2020; 57(11): 1060.     CrossRef
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    Medical Education.2019; 53(7): 655.     CrossRef
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    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
Usefulness of the DETECT program for assessing the internal structure of dimensionality in simulated data and results of the Korean nursing licensing examination  
Dong Gi Seo, Younyoung Choi, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:32.   Published online December 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.32
  • 24,336 View
  • 253 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The dimensionality of examinations provides empirical evidence of the internal test structure underlying the responses to a set of items. In turn, the internal structure is an important piece of evidence of the validity of an examination. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the DETECT program and to use it to examine the internal structure of the Korean nursing licensing examination.
Methods
Non-parametric methods of dimensional testing, such as the DETECT program, have been proposed as ways of overcoming the limitations of traditional parametric methods. A non-parametric method (the DETECT program) was investigated using simulation data under several conditions and applied to the Korean nursing licensing examination.
Results
The DETECT program performed well in terms of determining the number of underlying dimensions under several different conditions in the simulated data. Further, the DETECT program correctly revealed the internal structure of the Korean nursing licensing examination, meaning that it detected the proper number of dimensions and appropriately clustered the items within each dimension.
Conclusion
The DETECT program performed well in detecting the number of dimensions and in assigning items for each dimension. This result implies that the DETECT method can be useful for examining the internal structure of assessments, such as licensing examinations, that possess relatively many domains and content areas.

Citations

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  • Meanings of Rough Sex across Gender, Sexual Identity, and Political Ideology: A Conditional Covariance Approach
    Dubravka Svetina Valdivia, Debby Herbenick, Tsung-chieh Fu, Heather Eastman-Mueller, Lucia Guerra-Reyes, Molly Rosenberg
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    Dong Gi Seo, Jae Kum Kim
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 15.     CrossRef
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    Younyoung Choi, Dong Gi Seo
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 35.     CrossRef
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    Dong Gi Seo, Myeong Gi Kim, Na Hui Kim, Hye Sook Shin, Hyun Jung Kim
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Educational/faculty development material
The reach of Spanish-language YouTube videos on physical examinations made by undergraduate medical students  
José M. Ramos-Rincón, Isabel Belinchón-Romero, Francisco Sánchez-Ferrer, Guillermo Martínez-de la Torre, Meggan Harris, Javier Sánchez-Fernández
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:31.   Published online December 19, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.31
  • 32,408 View
  • 211 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study was conducted to evaluate the performance and reach of YouTube videos on physical examinations made by Spanish university students. We analyzed performance metrics for 4 videos on physical examinations in Spanish that were created by medical students at Miguel Hernández University (Elche, Spain) and are available on YouTube, on the following topics: the head and neck (7:30), the cardiovascular system (7:38), the respiratory system (13:54), and the abdomen (11:10). We used the Analytics application offered by the YouTube platform to analyze the reach of the videos from the upload date (February 17, 2015) to July 28, 2017 (2 years, 5 months, and 11 days). The total number of views, length of watch-time, and the mean view duration for the 4 videos were, respectively: 164,403 views (mean, 41,101 views; range, 12,389 to 94,573 views), 425,888 minutes (mean, 106,472 minutes; range, 37,889 to 172,840 minutes), and 2:56 minutes (range, 1:49 to 4:03 minutes). Mexico was the most frequent playback location, followed by Spain, Colombia, and Venezuela. Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico had the most views per 100,000 population. Spanish-language tutorials are an alternative tool for teaching physical examination skills to students whose first language is not English. The videos were especially popular in Uruguay, Ecuador, and Mexico.

Citations

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  • Student video production within health professions education: A scoping review
    Qian Liu, Susan Geertshuis, Tehmina Gladman, Rebecca Grainger
    Medical Education Online.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Opinion
An empirical approach to assessing training needs for emergency department management of intentional self-harm and related behaviors in the United States
Monica Whitehead, Jeffrey Shahidullah, Paul Kettlewell, Nicole Quinlan, Robert Strony
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:30.   Published online December 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.30
  • 22,855 View
  • 223 Download
PDFSupplementary Material
Research articles
Efficacy of an asynchronous electronic curriculum in emergency medicine education in the United States  
Alisa Wray, Kathryn Bennett, Megan Boysen-Osborn, Warren Wiechmann, Shannon Toohey
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:29.   Published online December 11, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.29
  • 30,230 View
  • 230 Download
  • 6 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to measure the effect of an iPad-based asynchronous curriculum on emergency medicine resident performance on the in-training exam (ITE). We hypothesized that the implementation of an asynchronous curriculum (replacing 1 hour of weekly didactic time) would result in non-inferior ITE scores compared to the historical scores of residents who had participated in the traditional 5-hour weekly didactic curriculum.
Methods
The study was a retrospective, non-inferiority study. conducted at the University of California, Irvine Emergency Medicine Residency Program. We compared ITE scores from 2012 and 2013, when there were 5 weekly hours of didactic content, with scores from 2014 and 2015, when 1 hour of conference was replaced with asynchro-nous content. Examination results were compared using a non-inferiority data analysis with a 10% margin of difference.
Results
Using a non-inferiority test with a 95% confidence interval, there was no difference between the 2 groups (before and after implementation of asynchronous learning), as the confidence interval for the change of the ITE was −3.5 to 2.3 points, whereas the 10% non-inferiority margin was 7.8 points.
Conclusion
Replacing 1 hour of didactic conference with asynchronous learning showed no negative impact on resident ITE scores.

Citations

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  • Development and Validation of Pediatric Opioid Analgesia Self-Instruction System (PedOASIS): An Opioid Knowledge Tool for Pediatric Clinicians
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Developing a framework for evaluating the impact of Healthcare Improvement Science Education across Europe: a qualitative study  
Manuel Lillo-Crespo, M. Cristina Sierras-Davó, Rhoda MacRae, Kevin Rooney
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:28.   Published online November 29, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.28
  • 32,123 View
  • 386 Download
  • 7 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Frontline healthcare professionals are well positioned to improve the systems in which they work. Educational curricula, however, have not always equipped healthcare professionals with the skills or knowledge to implement and evaluate improvements. It is important to have a robust and standardized framework in order to evaluate the impact of such education in terms of improvement, both within and across European countries. The results of such evaluations will enhance the further development and delivery of healthcare improvement science (HIS) education. We aimed to describe the development and piloting of a framework for prospectively evaluating the impact of HIS education and learning.
Methods
The evaluation framework was designed collaboratively and piloted in 7 European countries following a qualitative methodology. The present study used mixed methods to gather data from students and educators. The framework took the Kirkpatrick model of evaluation as a theoretical reference.
Results
The framework was found to be feasible and acceptable for use across differing European higher education contexts according to the pilot study and the participants’ consensus. It can be used effectively to evaluate and develop HIS education across European higher education institutions.
Conclusion
We offer a new evaluation framework to capture the impact of HIS education. The implementation of this tool has the potential to facilitate the continuous development of HIS education.

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    Clifford Y. Ko, Tejen Shah, Heidi Nelson, Avery B. Nathens
    JAMA Surgery.2022; 157(8): 737.     CrossRef
  • Kirkpatrick Model: Its Limitations as Used in Higher Education Evaluation
    Michael CAHAPAY
    International Journal of Assessment Tools in Education.2021; 8(1): 135.     CrossRef
  • Transforming the Future Healthcare Workforce across Europe through Improvement Science Training: A Qualitative Approach
    Maria Cristina Sierras-Davo, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdu, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(3): 1298.     CrossRef
  • Qualitative evaluation of an educational intervention about healthcare improvement for nursing students
    María Cristina Sierras-Davó, Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Patricia Verdú Rodríguez
    Aquichan.2021; 21(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Advanced Field Epidemiology Training Programs in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: A Multi-Country Study
    Mohannad Al Nsour, Yousef Khader, Haitham Bashier, Majd Alsoukhni
    Frontiers in Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The United Kingdom Field Epidemiology Training Programme: meeting programme objectives
    Paola Dey, Jeremy Brown, John Sandars, Yvonne Young, Ruth Ruggles, Samantha Bracebridge
    Eurosurveillance.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mapping the Status of Healthcare Improvement Science through a Narrative Review in Six European Countries
    Manuel Lillo-Crespo, Maria Cristina Sierras-Davó, Alan Taylor, Katrina Ritters, Aimilia Karapostoli
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(22): 4480.     CrossRef
Opinion
Utility of eye-tracking technology for preparing medical students in Spain for the summative objective structured clinical examination
Francisco Sánchez-Ferrer, J.M. Ramos-Rincón, M.D. Grima-Murcia, María Luisa Sánchez-Ferrer, Francisco Sánchez-del Campo, Antonio F. Compañ-Rosique, Eduardo Fernández-Jover
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:27.   Published online November 12, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.27
  • 37,514 View
  • 274 Download
  • 2 Citations
PDFSupplementary Material

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  • Assessment methods and the validity and reliability of measurement tools in online objective structured clinical examinations: a systematic scoping review
    Jonathan Zachary Felthun, Silas Taylor, Boaz Shulruf, Digby Wigram Allen
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 11.     CrossRef
  • Interesting statistics regarding the papers published in Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions in 2017
    Yera Hur
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2017; 14: 36.     CrossRef
Research articles
Perception survey on the introduction of clinical performance examination as part of the national nursing licensing examination in Korea  
Su Jin Shin, Yeong Kyeong Kim, Soon-Rim Suh, Duk Yoo Jung, Yunju Kim, Mi Kyoung Yim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:26.   Published online October 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.26
  • 30,170 View
  • 287 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to analyze opinions about the action plan for implementation of clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing examination and presents the expected effects of the performance exam and aspects to consider regarding its implementation.
Methods
This study used a mixed-methods design. Quantitative data were collected by a questionnaire survey, while qualitative data were collected by focus group interviews with experts. The survey targeted 200 nursing professors and clinical nurses with more than 5 years of work experience, and the focus group interviews were conducted with 28 of professors, clinical instructors, and nurses at hospitals.
Results
First, nursing professors and clinical specialists agreed that the current written tests have limitations in evaluating examinees’ ability, and that the introduction of a clinical performance exam will yield positive results. Clinical performance exam is necessary to evaluate and improve nurses’ work ability, which means that the implementation of a performance exam is advisable if its credibility and validity can be verified. Second, most respondents chose direct performance exams using simulators or standardized patients as the most suitable format of the test.
Conclusion
In conclusion, the current national nursing licensing exam is somewhat limited in its ability to identify competent nurses. Thus, the time has come for us to seriously consider the introduction of a performance exam. The prerequisites for successfully implementing clinical performance exam as part of the national nursing licensing exam are a professional training process and forming a consortium to standardize practical training.

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  • The Clinical Nursing Competency Assessment System of Ghana: Perspectives of Key Informants
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    SAGE Open.2022; 12(2): 215824402210899.     CrossRef
  • Adaptation of Extended Reality Smart Glasses for Core Nursing Skill Training Among Undergraduate Nursing Students: Usability and Feasibility Study
    Sun Kyung Kim, Youngho Lee, Hyoseok Yoon, Jongmyung Choi
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2021; 23(3): e24313.     CrossRef
  • Nursing Students’ Experiences on Clinical Competency Assessment in Ghana
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    Nurse Media Journal of Nursing.2021; 11(3): 278.     CrossRef
  • Clinical nursing competency assessment: a scoping review
    Oboshie Anim-Boamah, Christmal Dela Christmals, Susan Jennifer Armstrong
    Frontiers of Nursing.2021; 8(4): 341.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Success of the National Nursing Competency Examination taken by the Nursing Diploma Students in Yogyakarta
    Yulia Wardani
    Jurnal Ners.2020; 14(2): 172.     CrossRef
Evaluation of a course to prepare international students for the United States Medical Licensing Examination step 2 clinical skills exam  
Rachel B. Levine, Andrew P. Levy, Robert Lubin, Sarah Halevi, Rebeca Rios, Danelle Cayea
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:25.   Published online October 24, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.25
  • 28,517 View
  • 217 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
United States (US) and Canadian citizens attending medical school abroad often desire to return to the US for residency, and therefore must pass US licensing exams. We describe a 2-day United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) step 2 clinical skills (CS) preparation course for students in the Technion American Medical School program (Haifa, Israel) between 2012 and 2016.
Methods
Students completed pre- and post-course questionnaires. The paired t-test was used to measure students’ perceptions of knowledge, preparation, confidence, and competence in CS pre- and post-course. To test for differences by gender or country of birth, analysis of variance was used. We compared USMLE step 2 CS pass rates between the 5 years prior to the course and the 5 years during which the course was offered.
Results
Ninety students took the course between 2012 and 2016. Course evaluations began in 2013. Seventy-three students agreed to participate in the evaluation, and 64 completed the pre- and post-course surveys. Of the 64 students, 58% were US-born and 53% were male. Students reported statistically significant improvements in confidence and competence in all areas. No differences were found by gender or country of origin. The average pass rate for the 5 years prior to the course was 82%, and the average pass rate for the 5 years of the course was 89%.
Conclusion
A CS course delivered at an international medical school may help to close the gap between the pass rates of US and international medical graduates on a high-stakes licensing exam. More experience is needed to determine if this model is replicable.

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  • Immigrant Neurologists in the United States
    Abhimanyu Mahajan, Zachary London, Andrew M. Southerland, Jaffar Khan, Erica A. Schuyler
    Neurology.2021; 96(8): 378.     CrossRef
  • Three Decades Later: A Scoping Review of the Literature Related to the United States Medical Licensing Examination
    Hanin Rashid, Kristen M. Coppola, Robert Lebeau
    Academic Medicine.2020; 95(11S): S114.     CrossRef
  • Improving Passage Rate on USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills: Results from a Pilot Program
    Michael S. Ryan, Melissa Bradner, Fidelma Rigby, Bennett Lee, Elizabeth Waterhouse, Catherine Grossman
    Medical Science Educator.2019; 29(3): 709.     CrossRef
Does the acceptance of hybrid learning affect learning approaches in France?  
Lionel Di Marco, Alain Venot, Pierre Gillois
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:24.   Published online October 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.24
  • 29,435 View
  • 224 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Acceptance of a learning technology affects students’ intention to use that technology, but the influence of the acceptance of a learning technology on learning approaches has not been investigated in the literature. A deep learning approach is important in the field of health, where links must be created between skills, knowledge, and habits. Our hypothesis was that acceptance of a hybrid learning model would affect students’ way of learning.
Methods
We analysed these concepts, and their correlations, in the context of a flipped classroom method using a local learning management system. In a sample of all students within a single year of study in the midwifery program (n= 38), we used 3 validated scales to evaluate these concepts (the Study Process Questionnaire, My Intellectual Work Tools, and the Hybrid E-Learning Acceptance Model: Learner Perceptions).
Results
Our sample had a positive acceptance of the learning model, but a neutral intention to use it. Students reported that they were distractible during distance learning. They presented a better mean score for the deep approach than for the superficial approach (P< 0.001), which is consistent with their declared learning strategies (personal reorganization of information; search and use of examples). There was no correlation between poor acceptance of the learning model and inadequate learning approaches. The strategy of using deep learning techniques was moderately correlated with acceptance of the learning model (rs= 0.42, P= 0.03).
Conclusion
Learning approaches were not affected by acceptance of a hybrid learning model, due to the flexibility of the tool. However, we identified problems in the students’ time utilization, which explains their neutral intention to use the system.

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  • Online learning and teaching approaches used in midwifery programs: A scoping review
    Terri Downer, Michelle Gray, Tanya Capper
    Nurse Education Today.2021; 103: 104980.     CrossRef
  • Investigating the Flipped Classroom Model in a High School Writing Course: Action Research to Impact Student Writing Achievement and Engagement
    Elizabeth Ann Florence, Tammi Kolski
    TechTrends.2021; 65(6): 1042.     CrossRef
  • User-centered evaluation of Discord in midwifery education during the COVID-19 pandemic: Analysis of the adaptation of the tool to student needs
    Lionel Di Marco
    European Journal of Midwifery.2021; 5(November): 1.     CrossRef
  • Utilization of Nursing Defect Management Evaluation and Deep Learning in Nursing Process Reengineering Optimization
    Yue Liu, Huaping Liu, Osamah Ibrahim Khalaf
    Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Utilisation d’outils numériques dans le cadre d’un dispositif hybride pour l’apprentissage par problème de la physiologie en deuxième année des études médicales. Étude de faisabilité du recours au laboratoire numérique de physiologie « e-ϕsioLab ».
    Fares Gouzi, François Bughin, Lucie Barateau, Agathe Hubert, Savine Volland, Dalila Laoudj-Chenivesse, Emilie Passerieux, Régis Lopez, Antonia Perez-Martin, Iris Schuster-Beck, Stephan Matecki, Michel Dauzat, Yves Dauvilliers, Maurice Hayot, Jacques Merci
    Pédagogie Médicale.2018; 19(2): 77.     CrossRef
Opinion
Suggestions for a standard clinical practice curriculum and learning objectives for physical therapy education in Korea
Tae Young Oh, Kyung Soon Lee, Byung Jo Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:23.   Published online October 19, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.23
  • 25,701 View
  • 212 Download
  • 1 Citations
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Citations

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  • Integrated clinical experience with concurrent problem-based learning is associated with improved clinical reasoning among physical therapy students in the United States
    Brad Warren Willis, Anita Sethi Campbell, Stephen Paul Sayers, Kyle Gibson
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2018; 15: 30.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions