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Educational/faculty development materials
Using a virtual flipped classroom model to promote critical thinking in online graduate courses in the United States: a case presentation  
Jennifer Tomesko, Deborah Cohen, Jennifer Bridenbaugh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:5.   Published online February 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.5
  • 2,926 View
  • 404 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Flipped classroom models encourage student autonomy and reverse the order of traditional classroom content such as lectures and assignments. Virtual learning environments are ideal for executing flipped classroom models to improve critical thinking skills. This paper provides health professions faculty with guidance on developing a virtual flipped classroom in online graduate nutrition courses between September 2021 and January 2022 at the School of Health Professions, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey. Examples of pre-class, live virtual face-to-face, and post-class activities are provided. Active learning, immediate feedback, and enhanced student engagement in a flipped classroom may result in a more thorough synthesis of information, resulting in increased critical thinking skills. This article describes how a flipped classroom model design in graduate online courses that incorporate virtual face-to-face class sessions in a virtual learning environment can be utilized to promote critical thinking skills. Health professions faculty who teach online can apply the examples discussed to their online courses.

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  • Análisis bibliométrico de la producción científica mundial sobre el aula invertida en la educación médica
    Gloria Katty Muñoz-Estrada, Hugo Eladio Chumpitaz Caycho, John Barja-Ore, Natalia Valverde-Espinoza, Liliana Verde-Vargas, Frank Mayta-Tovalino
    Educación Médica.2022; 23(5): 100758.     CrossRef
  • Effect of a flipped classroom course to foster medical students’ AI literacy with a focus on medical imaging: a single group pre-and post-test study
    Matthias C. Laupichler, Dariusch R. Hadizadeh, Maximilian W. M. Wintergerst, Leon von der Emde, Daniel Paech, Elizabeth A. Dick, Tobias Raupach
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Interprofessional health education teacher training at the University of Chile  
Mónica Espinoza Barrios, Sandra Oyarzo Torres
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:30.   Published online November 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.30
  • 2,674 View
  • 160 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The first interprofessional course that included students in the 8 undergraduate health programs at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile was implemented in 2015. For the 700 students, 35 teachers were trained as facilitators. The use of several strategies to train facilitators in interprofessional health education, such as working in small groups, role-playing, case analysis, personal development workshops with experts’ participation, teamwork skills, feedback, videos, and reading articles, proved to be helpful. Facilitators highlighted the use of syllabi as a fundamental tool for teaching and coordination. This guide describes the experience of interprofessional health education teacher training from 2015 to 2019, highlighting the following lessons learned: the importance of support from university authorities, raising faculty awareness about interprofessional health education and collaborative practice, creating a teachers’ coordination team including representatives from all health programs, and ongoing monitoring and feedback from participants.
Implementation and lessons learned from 2 online interprofessional faculty development programs for improving educational practice in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021  
Cesar Orsini, Veena Rodrigues, Jorge Tricio
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:21.   Published online August 9, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.21
  • 4,322 View
  • 281 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study presents the design, implementation, and lessons learned from 2 fit-for-purpose online interprofessional faculty development programs for educational practice improvement in the health professions in Chile and the United Kingdom from 2018 to 2021. Both programs were designed to enhance teaching and learning practices in an interprofessional environment based on 4 pillars: professional diversity, egalitarianism, blended/online learning, and active learning strategies. A multidisciplinary mix of educators participated, showing similar results. The 3 main lessons learned were that the following factors facilitated an interprofessional environment: a professions-inclusive teaching style, a flexible learning climate, and interprofessional peer work. These lessons may be transferable to other programs seeking to enhance and support interprofessionality. Faculty development initiatives preparing educators for interprofessional practice should be an integral component of health professions education, as delivering these courses within professional silos is no longer justifiable. As the relevance of interprofessional education grows, an effective way of promoting interprofessonal education is to train the trainers in formal interprofessional settings.

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  • Perceived team roles of medical students: a five year cross-sectional study
    Anke Boone, Mathieu Roelants, Karel Hoppenbrouwers, Corinne Vandermeulen, Marc Du Bois, Lode Godderis
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Innovative digital tools for new trends in teaching and assessment methods in medical and dental education  
Jung-Chul Park, Hyuk-Jae Edward Kwon, Chul Woon Chung
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2021;18:13.   Published online June 29, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2021.18.13
  • 5,329 View
  • 397 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
With the goal of providing optimal care to patients, student-centered active learning and the development of clinical competency have become vital components of the education of future physicians capable of sustainably coping with future challenges. However, the shape of future medicine is dramatically changing based on advances in information and communication technology, and the current classroom model seems to have difficulties in fully preparing students for the future of medicine. New trends in teaching and assessment methods include computer-aided instruction, virtual patients, augmented reality, human patient simulations, and virtual reality for the assessment of students’ competency. The digital technologies introduced in medical and dental education include Google Forms to collect students’ answers, YouTube livestreaming, Google Art & Culture (an online art museum), and choose-your-own-adventure as a story-telling technique. Innovations in digital technology will lead the way toward a revolution in medical and dental education, allowing learning to be individualized, interactive, and efficient.

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  • Application of computer-based testing in the Korean Medical Licensing Examination, the emergence of the metaverse in medical education, journal metrics and statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 2.     CrossRef
  • Metaverse, Crypto, and NFTs in Dentistry
    Kelvin I. Afrashtehfar, Aiman S. H. Abu-Fanas
    Education Sciences.2022; 12(8): 538.     CrossRef
  • An innovative approach to teaching depression and anxiety medication management: Virtual choose your own adventure, psychiatry edition
    Nina Vadiei, Jeannie K. Lee
    Mental Health Clinician.2022; 12(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Medical students’ self-assessed efficacy and satisfaction with training on endotracheal intubation and central venous catheterization with smart glasses in Taiwan: a non-equivalent control-group pre- and post-test study
    Yu-Fan Lin, Chien-Ying Wang, Yen-Hsun Huang, Sheng-Min Lin, Ying-Ying Yang
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2022; 19: 25.     CrossRef
Guidelines for the management of extravasation  
Jung Tae Kim, Jeong Yun Park, Hyun Jung Lee, Young Ju Cheon
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:21.   Published online August 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.21
  • 15,068 View
  • 681 Download
  • 18 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
The purpose of these practice guidelines is to offer and share strategies for preventing extravasation and measures for handling drugs known to cause tissue necrosis, which may occur even with the most skilled experts at intravenous (IV) injection. Herein, general knowledge about extravasation is first described, including its definition, incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and extravasation injuries. Management of extravasation includes nursing intervention and thermal application. At the first sign of extravasation, nursing intervention with following steps is recommended: stop administration of IV fluids immediately, disconnect the IV tube from the cannula, aspirate any remaining drug from the cannula, administer drug-specific antidote, and notify the physician. Local thermal treatments are used to decrease the site reaction and absorption of the infiltrate. Local cooling (ice packs) aids in vasoconstriction, theoretically limiting the drug dispersion. Although clear benefit has not been demonstrated with thermal applications, it remains a standard supportive care. The recommended application schedule for both warm and cold applications is 15 to 20 minutes, every 4 hours, for 24 to 48 hours. For prevention of extravasation, health professionals should be familiar with the extravasation management standard guidelines. They should regularly check the extravasation kit, assess patients’ sensory changes, tingling or burning, and always pay attention to patients’ words. The medical team’s continuous education on extravasation is essential. With the practical use of these guidelines, it is expected to reduce the occurrence rate of extravasation and contribute to patient care improvement.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Peripheral venous extravasation injury
    M.J. Billingham, R. Mittal
    BJA Education.2023; 23(2): 42.     CrossRef
  • Cutaneous Management after Extravasation of High-Concentrated Amino Acid Solution Administered for Renal Protection in PRRT
    Chaninart Sakulpisuti, Wichana Chamroonrat, Supatporn Tepmongkol
    Tomography.2022; 8(1): 356.     CrossRef
  • An updated narrative review on the management of the most common oncological and hematological emergencies
    Ali Issani
    Disease-a-Month.2022; : 101355.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Onkologie up2date.2022; 4(02): 116.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge regarding management of extravasation of chemotherapeutic drugs
    Prakash Pooja, Chandra Ayush , Kotha Malathi , Das Santosh Kumar , Prakash Barsha , Chandra Avinash , Sherpa Gyaljin , Acharya Sudikshya
    Insights on the Depression and Anxiety.2022; 6(1): 018.     CrossRef
  • Intervenção de enfermagem perante o extravasamento de citostáticos - um contributo na prevenção da queimadura química
    Ana Marcelino, Marta Ganhão
    Onco.News.2022; (45): e067.     CrossRef
  • Yenidoğan yoğun bakım ünitesinde çalışan sağlık personelinin ekstravazasyon bilgi birikimi ve yönetimi
    Ayşen ORMAN, Yalçın ÇELİK, Nihan ÖZEL ERÇEL
    Mersin Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; : 465.     CrossRef
  • SOP Einteilung und Therapie von Paravasaten
    Svenja Wulf
    Frauenheilkunde up2date.2021; 15(02): 107.     CrossRef
  • Tissue distribution of epirubicin after severe extravasation in humans
    Jakob Nedomansky, Werner Haslik, Ursula Pluschnig, Christoph Kornauth, Christine Deutschmann, Stefan Hacker, Günther G. Steger, Rupert Bartsch, Robert M. Mader
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology.2021; 88(2): 203.     CrossRef
  • Novel Conformal Skin Patch with Embedded Thin-Film Electrodes for Early Detection of Extravasation
    Ruiqi Lim, Ramona B. Damalerio, Choon Looi Bong, Swee Kim Tan, Ming-Yuan Cheng
    Sensors.2021; 21(10): 3429.     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of combination of localized closure, ethacridine lactate dressing, and phototherapy in treatment of severe extravasation injuries: A case series
    Yan-Xu Lu, Ying Wu, Peng-Fei Liang, Rong-Chan Wu, Ling-Yun Tian, Hui-Ying Mo
    World Journal of Clinical Cases.2021; 9(18): 4599.     CrossRef
  • Modern approaches for long-term venous access in oncology
    Yu.V. Buydenok
    Onkologiya. Zhurnal imeni P.A.Gertsena.2021; 10(3): 69.     CrossRef
  • Elaboration and validation of an algorithm for treating peripheral intravenous infiltration and extravasation in children
    Luciano Marques dos Santos, Katharinne de Jesus Nunes, Cleonara Sousa Gomes e Silva, Denise Miyuki Kusahara, Elisa da Conceição Rodrigues, Ariane Ferreira Machado Avelar
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measuring the Validity and Reliability of the Vascular Access Complication Staging and Treatment Instrument in a Pediatric Population
    Genieveve J. Cline, Virginia Pohlod, Kristina J. Burger, Ernest K. Amankwah
    Journal of Infusion Nursing.2021; 44(4): 225.     CrossRef
  • Nurses’ knowledge and experience related to short peripheral venous catheter extravasation
    Selma Atay, Şengül Üzen Cura, Sevda Efil
    The Journal of Vascular Access.2021; : 112972982110455.     CrossRef
  • Chemotherapy Extravasation: Incidence of and Factors Associated With Events in a Community Cancer Center
    Nancy Ehmke
    Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing.2021; 25(6): 680.     CrossRef
  • Drug Extravasation in a Large General Hospital in Hunan, China: A Retrospective Survey
    Zhihong Gong, Jinghui Zhang, Jianmei Hou, Shujie Chen, Zixin Hu, Xiaoya Kong, Guiyuan Ma, Lingxia Luo
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 4931.     CrossRef
  • The Journal Citation Indicator has arrived for Emerging Sources Citation Index journals, including the Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions, in June 2021
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 20.     CrossRef
Rules and guidelines for distancing in daily life to control coronavirus disease 2019 in Korea: 3rd version, announced on July 3, 2020  
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:20.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.20
  • 4,546 View
  • 149 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
In Korea, the first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was reported on January 21, 2020, after which the number of infected people began to increase. Intensive control measures stabilized the spread of COVID-19 in Korea. Therefore, the Korean government introduced the policy of “distancing in daily life” to support the maintenance of normal life starting on March 22, 2020. This policy provides rules and guidelines on distancing in daily life to facilitate the control of COVID-19 in Korea. “Distancing in daily life” refers to a new, sustainable way of life and social interactions that prepares society to face the possibility of long-term prevalence of COVID-19. These guidelines aim to achieve the goal of infection prevention and containment, while sustaining people’s everyday life, economic, and social activities. All members of society and communities are called upon to fulfill their respective responsibilities to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and to safeguard everyone’s health and well-being. Five key rules govern personal distancing in daily life: stay home for 3–4 days if you feel unwell; keep a distance of 2 arms’ length from others; wash your hands for 30 seconds and cough or sneeze into your sleeve; ventilate spaces at least twice a day and disinfect regularly; and stay connected while physically distancing. Collective distancing in daily life for communities and organizations is supported by these 5 key rules, and detailed guidelines are set out for different types of facilities. All individuals and communities are obliged to abide by these rules and guidelines for distancing as part of daily life.

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  • Social distance capacity to control the COVID-19 pandemic: A systematic review on time series analysis
    Omid Khosravizadeh, Bahman Ahadinezhad, Aisa Maleki, Zahra Najafpour, Rohollah Golmohammadi
    International Journal of Risk & Safety in Medicine.2022; 33(1): 5.     CrossRef
  • Anti-SARS-CoV-2 and anti-cytokine storm neutralizing antibody therapies against COVID-19: Update, challenges, and perspectives
    Cassiano Martin Batista, Leonardo Foti
    International Immunopharmacology.2021; 99: 108036.     CrossRef
  • Influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on Asian scholarly journal editors’ daily life, work, and opinions on future journal development
    Yeonok Chung, Sue Kim, Sun Huh
    Science Editing.2020; 7(2): 111.     CrossRef
  • Reflections as 2020 comes to an end: the editing and educational environment during the COVID-19 pandemic, the power of Scopus and Web of Science in scholarly publishing, journal statistics, and appreciation to reviewers and volunteers
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 44.     CrossRef
Analysis of the Clinical Education Situation framework: a tool for identifying the root cause of student failure in the United States  
Katherine Myers, Kyle Covington
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2019;16:11.   Published online May 10, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.11
  • 14,006 View
  • 244 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Doctor of physical therapy preparation requires extensive time in precepted clinical education, which involves multiple stakeholders. Student outcomes in clinical education are impacted by many factors, and, in the case of failure, it can be challenging to determine which factors played a primary role in the poor result. Using existing root-cause analysis processes, the authors developed and implemented a framework designed to identify the causes of student failure in clinical education. This framework, when applied to a specific student failure event, can be used to identify the factors that contributed to the situation and to reveal opportunities for improvement in both the clinical and academic environments. A root-cause analysis framework can help to drive change at the programmatic level, and future studies should focus on the framework’s application to a variety of clinical and didactic settings.

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  • The situational analysis of teaching-learning in clinical education in Iran: a postmodern grounded theory study
    Soleiman Ahmady, Hamed Khani
    BMC Medical Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
The reach of Spanish-language YouTube videos on physical examinations made by undergraduate medical students  
José M. Ramos-Rincón, Isabel Belinchón-Romero, Francisco Sánchez-Ferrer, Guillermo Martínez-de la Torre, Meggan Harris, Javier Sánchez-Fernández
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:31.   Published online December 19, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.31
  • 32,545 View
  • 211 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
This study was conducted to evaluate the performance and reach of YouTube videos on physical examinations made by Spanish university students. We analyzed performance metrics for 4 videos on physical examinations in Spanish that were created by medical students at Miguel Hernández University (Elche, Spain) and are available on YouTube, on the following topics: the head and neck (7:30), the cardiovascular system (7:38), the respiratory system (13:54), and the abdomen (11:10). We used the Analytics application offered by the YouTube platform to analyze the reach of the videos from the upload date (February 17, 2015) to July 28, 2017 (2 years, 5 months, and 11 days). The total number of views, length of watch-time, and the mean view duration for the 4 videos were, respectively: 164,403 views (mean, 41,101 views; range, 12,389 to 94,573 views), 425,888 minutes (mean, 106,472 minutes; range, 37,889 to 172,840 minutes), and 2:56 minutes (range, 1:49 to 4:03 minutes). Mexico was the most frequent playback location, followed by Spain, Colombia, and Venezuela. Uruguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Puerto Rico had the most views per 100,000 population. Spanish-language tutorials are an alternative tool for teaching physical examination skills to students whose first language is not English. The videos were especially popular in Uruguay, Ecuador, and Mexico.

Citations

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  • Student video production within health professions education: A scoping review
    Qian Liu, Susan Geertshuis, Tehmina Gladman, Rebecca Grainger
    Medical Education Online.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
A new experimental community pharmacy internship module for undergraduate pharmacy students in western Nepal: overview and reflections  
Sangita Timsina, Bhuvan K.C., Dristi Adhikari, Alian A. Alrasheedy, Mohamed Izham Mohamed Ibrahim, Atisammodavardhana Kaundinnyayana
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:18.   Published online August 16, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.18
  • 28,936 View
  • 303 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Community pharmacies in Nepal and other South Asian countries are in a mediocre state due to poor regulation and the fact that many pharmacies are run by people with insufficient training in dispensing. This has led to the inappropriate use of medicines. The problems due to poor regulation and the mediocre state of community pharmacies in South Asia encompass both academia and clinical practice. In this paper, a 2-week community pharmacy internship programme completed by 2 graduating pharmacy students of Pokhara University (a Nepalese public university) at Sankalpa Pharmacy, Pokhara, Nepal is illustrated. During the internship, they were systematically trained on store management, pharmaceutical care, counselling skills, the use of medical devices, pharmaceutical business plans, medicine information sources, and adverse drug reaction reporting. An orientation, observations and hands-on training, case presentation, discussion, and feedback from 2 senior pharmacists were used as the training method. A proper community pharmacy internship format, good pharmacy practice standards, and a better work environment for pharmacists may improve the quality of community pharmacies.

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  • Using the Business Model Canvas to Guide Doctor of Pharmacy Students in Building Business Plans
    David A. Holdford, Vasco M. Pontinha, Tyler D. Wagner
    American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education.2022; 86(3): 8719.     CrossRef
  • Rural Public Health Workforce Training and Development: The Performance of an Undergraduate Internship Programme in a Rural Hospital and Healthcare Centre
    Luis Dos Santos
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(7): 1259.     CrossRef
Educational/Faculty Development Materials
Improving student-perceived benefit of academic advising within education of occupational and physical therapy in the United States: a quality improvement initiative  
Lisa J. Barnes, Robin Parish
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2017;14:4.   Published online March 25, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2017.14.4
  • 32,339 View
  • 321 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Academic advising is a key role for faculty in the educational process of health professionals; however, the best practice of effective academic advising for occupational and physical therapy students has not been identified in the current literature. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to assess and improve the faculty/student advisor/advisee process within occupational and physical therapy programs within a school of allied health professions in the United States in 2015. A quality improvement initiative utilizing quantitative and qualitative information was gathered via survey focused on the assessment and improvement of an advisor/advisee process. The overall initiative utilized an adaptive iterative design incorporating the plan-do-study-act model which included a threestep process over a one year time frame utilizing 2 cohorts, the first with 80 students and the second with 88 students. Baseline data were gathered prior to initiating the new process. A pilot was conducted and assessed during the first semester of the occupational and physical therapy programs. Final information was gathered after one full academic year with final comparisons made to baseline. Defining an effective advisory program with an established framework led to improved awareness and participation by students and faculty. Early initiation of the process combined with increased frequency of interaction led to improved student satisfaction. Based on student perceptions, programmatic policies were initiated to promote advisory meetings early and often to establish a positive relationship. The policies focus on academic advising as one of proactivity in which the advisor serves as a portal which the student may access leading to a more successful academic experience.

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  • Preparing Students for Change: An Advisement Seminar Informed by Tolman and Kremling’s Integrated Model of Student Resistance
    Jeni Dulek, Michelle Gorenberg, Kaylinn Hill, Kelsey Walsh, Molly Perkins
    Occupational Therapy In Health Care.2023; 37(1): 164.     CrossRef
  • Student perception of academic advising in a school of pharmacy
    Caroline M Sierra, Jessa Koch, Jody Gonzalez, Khaled Bahjri
    International Journal of Pharmacy Practice.2022; 30(2): 184.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Problematic Internet Use and Social-Appearance Anxiety on the Smartphone Addiction of Adolescents
    Özlem Şensoy, Dijle Ayar
    Cyprus Journal of Medical Sciences.2022; 7(3): 354.     CrossRef
  • Academic advising in undergraduate education: A systematic review
    Zenobia C.Y. Chan, Ho Yan Chan, Hang Chak Jason Chow, Sze Nga Choy, Ka Yan Ng, Koon Yiu Wong, Pui Kan Yu
    Nurse Education Today.2019; 75: 58.     CrossRef
  • Scoping review of mentoring research in the occupational therapy literature, 2002–2018
    Nancy W. Doyle, Liat Gafni Lachter, Karen Jacobs
    Australian Occupational Therapy Journal.2019; 66(5): 541.     CrossRef
Implementation of a multi-level evaluation strategy: a case study on a program for international medical graduates
Debra Nestel, Melanie Regan, Priyanga Vijayakumar, Irum Sunderji, Cathy Haigh, Cathy Smith, Alistair Wright
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2011;8:13.   Published online December 17, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2011.8.13
  • 28,341 View
  • 164 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Evaluation of educational interventions is often focused on immediate and/or short-term metrics associated with knowledge and/or skills acquisition. We developed an educational intervention to support international medical graduates working in rural Victoria. We wanted an evaluation strategy that included participants??reactions and considered transfer of learning to the workplace and retention of learning. However, with participants in distributed locations and limited program resources, this was likely to prove challenging. Elsewhere, we have reported the outcomes of this evaluation. In this educational development report, we describe our evaluation strategy as a case study, its underpinning theoretical framework, the strategy, and its benefits and challenges. The strategy sought to address issues of program structure, process, and outcomes. We used a modified version of Kirkpatrick?占퐏 model as a framework to map our evaluation of participants??experiences, acquisition of knowledge and skills, and their application in the workplace. The predominant benefit was that most of the evaluation instruments allowed for personalization of the program. The baseline instruments provided a broad view of participants??expectations, needs, and current perspective on their role. Immediate evaluation instruments allowed ongoing tailoring of the program to meet learning needs. Intermediate evaluations facilitated insight on the transfer of learning. The principal challenge related to the resource intensive nature of the evaluation strategy. A dedicated program administrator was required to manage data collection. Although resource-intensive, we recommend baseline, immediate, and intermediate data collection points, with multi-source feedback being especially illuminating. We believe our experiences may be valuable to faculty involved in program evaluations.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The evaluation of a home-based paediatric nursing service: concept and design development using the Kirkpatrick model
    Catherine Jones, Jennifer Fraser, Sue Randall
    Journal of Research in Nursing.2018; 23(6): 492.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of a consulting training course for international development assistance for health
    Pan Gao, Hao Xiang, Suyang Liu, Yisi Liu, Shengjie Dong, Feifei Liu, Wenyuan Yu, Xiangyu Li, Li Guan, Yuanyuan Chu, Zongfu Mao, Shu Chen, Shenglan Tang
    BMC Medical Education.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Cumulative evaluation data: pediatric airway management simulation courses for pediatric residents
    Sawsan Alyousef, Haifa Marwa, Najd Alnojaidi, Hani Lababidi, Muhammad Salman Bashir
    Advances in Simulation.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Supporting international medical graduates’ transition to their host-country: realist synthesis
    Amelia Kehoe, John McLachlan, Jane Metcalf, Simon Forrest, Madeline Carter, Jan Illing
    Medical Education.2016; 50(10): 1015.     CrossRef
  • Liaison Officer for International Medical Graduates: Research Findings from Australia
    Pam McGrath, David Henderson, Hamish A. Holewa
    Illness, Crisis & Loss.2013; 21(1): 15.     CrossRef
Senior Resident Training on Educational Principles (STEP): A Proposed Innovative Step from a Developing Nation
Satendra Singh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2010;7:3.   Published online December 1, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2010.7.3
  • 45,551 View
  • 153 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Resident-as-teacher courses are pretty common in Western medical schools however they are a rarity in Asian and developing countries. The current report is a scholarly analysis of a three day orientation program for senior residents in order to improve their functioning by providing new template either for supplementing basic workshops for faculty or to advocate a change in system. The experience gained by Medical Education Unit of University College of Medical Sciences can be used to conduct training breeding grounds at national or regional levels. Resident as teachers educational interventions need to be designed taking into account their impact on education system.

Citations

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  • Curso de docencia para residentes: evaluación de un programa
    Ana C. Olascoaga
    Educación Médica.2020; 21(3): 187.     CrossRef
  • Developing Humanistic Competencies Within the Competency-Based Curriculum
    Satendra Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal, Navjeevan Singh
    Indian Pediatrics.2020; 57(11): 1060.     CrossRef
  • Minor Gynecologic Surgery: A Review of the Training Experience and Skill Building Opportunities for Providers in Low and Middle Income Countries
    Rachel Marie Clark, Leslie Siriya Bradford, Jessica Opoku-Anane, Joseph Ngonzi, Ferdous Islam, Mithila Faruque, Annekathryn Goodman
    Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2014; 04(07): 432.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions