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Successful pilot application of multi-attribute utility analysis concepts in evaluating academic-clinical partnerships in the United States: a case report  
Sara Elizabeth North, Amanda Nicole Sharp
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2022;19:18.   Published online August 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2022.19.18
  • 814 View
  • 112 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Strong partnerships between academic health professions programs and clinical practice settings, termed academic-clinical partnerships, are essential in providing quality clinical training experiences. However, the literature does not operationalize a model by which an academic program may identify priority attributes and evaluate its partnerships. This study aimed to develop a values-based academic-clinical partnership evaluation approach, rooted in methodologies from the field of evaluation and implemented in the context of an academic Doctor of Physical Therapy clinical education program. The authors developed a semi-quantitative evaluation approach incorporating concepts from multi-attribute utility analysis (MAUA) that enabled consistent, values-based partnership evaluation. Data-informed actions led to improved overall partnership effectiveness. Pilot outcomes support the feasibility and desirability of moving toward MAUA as a potential methodological framework. Further research may lead to the development of a standardized process for any academic health profession program to perform a values-based evaluation of their academic-clinical partnerships to guide decision-making.
Dental students’ learning attitudes and perceptions of YouTube as a lecture video hosting platform in a flipped classroom in Korea  
Chang Wan Seo, A Ra Cho, Jung Chul Park, Hag Yeon Cho, Sun Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:24.   Published online October 11, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.24
  • 26,539 View
  • 363 Download
  • 12 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The aim of this study was to confirm the applicability of YouTube as a delivery platform of lecture videos for dental students and to assess their learning attitudes towards the flipped classroom model.
Methods
Learning experiences after using the YouTube platform to deliver preliminary video lectures in a flipped classroom were assessed by 69 second-year students (52 males, 17 females) at Dankook University College of Dentistry, Korea, who attended periodontology lectures during 2 consecutive semesters of the 2016 academic year. The instructor uploaded the lecture videos to YouTube before each class. At the end of the second semester, the students were surveyed using a questionnaire devised by the authors.
Results
Of the students, 53 (76.8%) always watched the lecture before the class, 48 (69.6%) used their smartphones, and 66 (95.7%) stated that they watched the lectures at home. The majority of the students replied that the video lectures were easier to understand than face to face lectures (82.6%) and that they would like to view the videos again after graduation (73.9%).
Conclusion
Our results indicate that YouTube is an applicable platform to deliver video lectures and to expose students to increased learning opportunities.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Learning of paediatric dentistry with the flipped classroom model
    Nuria E. Gallardo, Antonia M. Caleya, Maria Esperanza Sánchez, Gonzalo Feijóo
    European Journal of Dental Education.2022; 26(2): 302.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Video Length on a Flipped English Classroom
    Zhonggen Yu, Mingle Gao
    SAGE Open.2022; 12(1): 215824402110684.     CrossRef
  • An Evaluation of the Usefulness of YouTube® Videos on Crown Preparation
    Syed Rashid Habib, Aleshba Saba Khan, Mohsin Ali, Essam Abdulla Abutheraa, Ahmad khaled alkhrayef, Faisal Jibrin Aljibrin, Nawaf Saad Almutairi, Ammar A. Siddiqui
    BioMed Research International.2022; 2022: 1.     CrossRef
  • Diş Hekimliği Eğitiminde Öğrencilerin Uzaktan Eğitim ve E-Öğrenme Algıları: Zorluklar ve Fırsatlar
    Ayşe TORAMAN, Ebru SAĞLAM, Serhat KÖSEOĞLU
    JOURNAL OF BIOTECHNOLOGY AND STRATEGIC HEALTH RESEARCH.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Social media as a learning tool for the budding periodontist: A questionnaire survey
    Riddhi Awasthi, Balaji Manohar, S Vinay, Santosh Kumar
    Advances in Human Biology.2022; 12(3): 286.     CrossRef
  • YouTube and Education: A Scoping Review
    Abdulhadi Shoufan, Fatma Mohamed
    IEEE Access.2022; 10: 125576.     CrossRef
  • Social media as a learning tool: Dental students’ perspectives
    Mona T. Rajeh, Shahinaz N. Sembawa, Afnan A. Nassar, Seba A. Al Hebshi, Khalid T. Aboalshamat, Mohammed K. Badri
    Journal of Dental Education.2021; 85(4): 513.     CrossRef
  • Social Media Usage among Dental Undergraduate Students—A Comparative Study
    Eswara Uma, Pentti Nieminen, Shani Ann Mani, Jacob John, Emilia Haapanen, Marja-Liisa Laitala, Olli-Pekka Lappalainen, Eby Varghase, Ankita Arora, Kanwardeep Kaur
    Healthcare.2021; 9(11): 1408.     CrossRef
  • Does forced-shift to online learning affect university brand image in South Korea? Role of perceived harm and international students’ learning engagement
    Umer Zaman, Murat Aktan, Hasnan Baber, Shahid Nawaz
    Journal of Marketing for Higher Education.2021; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Flipped Classroom Experiences in Clinical Dentistry – A Strategic Mini-Review
    Abdullah Aljabr
    The Open Dentistry Journal.2021; 15(1): 717.     CrossRef
  • Newly appointed medical faculty members’ self-evaluation of their educational roles at the Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine in 2020 and 2021: a cross-sectional survey-based study
    Sun Kim, A Ra Cho, Chul Woon Chung
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2021; 18: 28.     CrossRef
  • Attitudes toward Social Media among Practicing Dentists and Dental Students in Clinical Years in Saudi Arabia
    Khalid Aboalshamat, Sharifah Alkiyadi, Sarah Alsaleh, Rana Reda, Sharifa Alkhaldi, Arwa Badeeb, Najwa Gabb
    The Open Dentistry Journal.2019; 13(1): 143.     CrossRef
Distribution and academic significance of learning approaches among pre-clinical medical students at Trinity School of Medicine, St Vincent and the Grenadines  
Keshab Raj Paudel, Hari Prasad Nepal, Binu Shrestha, Raju Panta, Stephen Toth
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:9.   Published online April 6, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.9
  • 32,364 View
  • 247 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
Different students may adopt different learning approaches: namely, deep and surface. This study aimed to characterize the learning strategies of medical students at Trinity School of Medicine and to explore potential correlations between deep learning approach and the students’ academic scores.
Methods
The study was a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional, observational study. A total of 169 medical students in the basic science years of training were included in the study after giving informed consent. The Biggs’s Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire in paper form was distributed to subjects from January to November 2017. For statistical analyses, the Student t-test, 1-way analysis of variance followed by the post-hoc t-test, and the Pearson correlation test were used. The Cronbach alpha was used to test the internal consistency of the questionnaire.
Results
Of the 169 subjects, 132 (response rate, 78.1%) completely filled out the questionnaires. The Cronbach alpha value for the items on the questionnaire was 0.8. The score for the deep learning approach was 29.4± 4.6, whereas the score for the surface approach was 24.3± 4.2, which was a significant difference (P< 0.05). A positive correlation was found between the deep learning approach and students’ academic performance (r= 0.197, P< 0.05, df= 130).
Conclusion
Medical students in the basic science years at Trinity School of Medicine adopted the deep learning approach more than the surface approach. Likewise, students who were more inclined towards the deep learning approach scored significantly higher on academic tests.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Student characteristics associated with dominant approaches to studying: Comparing a national and an international sample
    Mikkel M. Thørrisen, Gry Mørk, Lene A. Åsli, Astrid Gramstad, Linda Stigen, Trine A. Magne, Tove Carstensen, Susanne G. Johnson, Ted Brown, Hua B. Lim, Kenneth N. K. Fong, Tore Bonsaksen
    Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy.2022; 29(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Development and Preliminary Validation of the Physical Education-Study Process Questionnaire : Insights for Physical Education University Students
    Amayra Tannoubi, Noomen Guelmami, Tore Bonsaksen, Nasr Chalghaf, Fairouz Azaiez, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predictors of undergraduate occupational therapy students’ academic performance during the Covid-19 pandemic: A hierarchical regression analysis
    Ted Brown, Luke Robinson, Kate Gledhill, Mong-Lin Yu, Stephen Isbel, Craig Greber, Dave Parsons, Jamie Etherington
    Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Formative feedback from the first-person perspective using Google Glass in a family medicine objective structured clinical examination station in the United States  
Julie Youm, Warren Wiechmann
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:5.   Published online March 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.5
  • 34,819 View
  • 329 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
This case study explored the use of Google Glass in a clinical examination scenario to capture the first-person perspective of a standardized patient as a way to provide formative feedback on students’ communication and empathy skills ‘through the patient’s eyes.’
Methods
During a 3-year period between 2014 and 2017, third-year students enrolled in a family medicine clerkship participated in a Google Glass station during a summative clinical examination. At this station, standardized patients wore Google Glass to record an encounter focused on communication and empathy skills ‘through the patient’s eyes.’ Students completed an online survey using a 4-point Likert scale about their perspectives on Google Glass as a feedback tool (N= 255).
Results
We found that the students’ experiences with Google Glass ‘through the patient’s eyes’ were largely positive and that students felt the feedback provided by the Google Glass recording to be helpful. Although a third of the students felt that Google Glass was a distraction, the majority believed that the first-person perspective recordings provided an opportunity for feedback that did not exist before.
Conclusion
Continuing exploration of first-person perspective recordings using Google Glass to improve education on communication and empathy skills is warranted.
Authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid gynecology station for the Papanicolaou test as part of a clinical skills examination in Korea  
Ji-Hyun Seo, Younglim Oh, Sunju Im, Do-Kyong Kim, Hyun-Hee Kong, HyeRin Roh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2018;15:4.   Published online February 13, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.4
  • 34,527 View
  • 308 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Purpose
The objective of this study was to evaluate the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of a hybrid station that combined a standardized patient encounter and a simulated Papanicolaou test.
Methods
We introduced a hybrid station in the routine clinical skills examination (CSE) for 335 third-year medical students at 4 universities in Korea from December 1 to December 3, 2014. After the tests, we conducted an anonymous survey on the authenticity, acceptability, and feasibility of the hybrid station.
Results
A total of 334 medical students and 17 professors completed the survey. A majority of the students (71.6%) and professors (82.4%) agreed that the hybrid station was more authentic than the standard CSE. Over 60 percent of the students and professors responded that the station was acceptable for assessing the students’ competence. Most of the students (75.2%) and professors (82.4%) assessed the required tasks as being feasible after reading the instructions.
Conclusion
Our results showed that the hybrid CSE station was a highly authentic, acceptable, and feasible way to assess medical students’ performance.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • From Research to Practice in OBGYN: How to Critically Interpret Studies in Implementation
    Rebecca F. Hamm, Michelle H. Moniz
    Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology.2022; 65(2): 277.     CrossRef
  • Clinical performance of medical students in Korea in a whole-task emergency station in the objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient complaining of palpitations
    Song Yi Park, Hyun-Hee Kong, Min-Jeong Kim, Yoo Sang Yoon, Sang-Hwa Lee, Sunju Im, Ji-Hyun Seo
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2020; 17: 42.     CrossRef
  • To the Point: The expanding role of simulation in obstetrics and gynecology medical student education
    Elise N. Everett, David A. Forstein, Susan Bliss, Samantha D. Buery-Joyner, LaTasha B. Craig, Scott C. Graziano, Brittany S. Hampton, Laura Hopkins, Margaret L. McKenzie, Helen Morgan, Archana Pradhan, Sarah M. Page-Ramsey
    American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.2019; 220(2): 129.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions