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Upreet Dhaliwal 3 Articles
Visible Facebook profiles and e-professionalism in undergraduate medical students in India  
Setu Gupta, Satendra Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:50.   Published online October 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.50
  • 44,762 View
  • 182 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to assess medical students’ presence on Facebook and the extent of their visible activity, with particular reference to online professionalism. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including all medical students enrolled in the University College of Medical Sciences, University of Delhi, India during the period of the study, which was conducted from 2011 to 2012. After approval by the Institutional Ethical Committee, the full names of all students were obtained from our institution. After creating a fictitious profile, Facebook was searched for students’ profiles, and those found were examined for visible content and unprofessional behaviour. Results: Of 611 students, 477 (78.1%) had detectable Facebook profiles. Out of 477 profiles, date of birth, address, email, phone number, religion, and political views were rarely shared; sexual orientation and relationship status were displayed on approximately one third of the profiles; and an identifiable profile picture (80.3%), field of study (51.6%), and institution (86.2%) were commonly shared . The visible content included friend lists (88.7%), photo albums (36.1%), and associations with diverse groups and pages (97.1%). Five profiles (1.05%) displayed unprofessional content, including one profile photograph depicting alcohol consumption, one association with groups relating to excessive alcohol consumption, two profiles containing sexually explicit language, and one association with a sexist page. Conclusion: Most of our students use Facebook’s privacy settings to hide some content from others. Unprofessional content was rarely visible from a stranger’s profile. However, even when hidden from strangers, unprofessional behaviour is still unprofessional behaviour. As Facebook is an integral part of life, it is important for medical educators and students to understand the implications and importance of e-professionalism. Professionalism curricula should address e-professionalism.

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  • Online professionalism of Facebook usage in dental education: A retrospective exploration
    Tawepong Arayapisit, Jidapa Jarunsiripaisarn, Thitaree Setthamongkol, Dhitaya Ochaphan, Tanaporn Songsomsup, Kawin Sipiyaruk
    Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dangers and Benefits of Social Media on E-Professionalism of Health Care Professionals: Scoping Review
    Tea Vukušić Rukavina, Joško Viskić, Lovela Machala Poplašen, Danko Relić, Marko Marelić, Drazen Jokic, Kristijan Sedak
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2021; 23(11): e25770.     CrossRef
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    Lynne Briggs, Patricia Fronek
    Journal of Social Work Education.2020; 56(2): 238.     CrossRef
  • Impact of experience of psychiatrists and psychiatry residents regarding electronic communication and social networking on internet use patterns: a questionnaire survey for developing e-professionalism in South Korea
    Yeon Jung Lee, Jaeuk Hwang, Soyoung Irene Lee, Sung-Il Woo, Sang Woo Hahn, Steve Koh
    BMC Medical Education.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ryan Laws, Geoffrey Hunt, Tamar M. J. Antin
    Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.2018; 35(4): 288.     CrossRef
Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India  
Satendra Singh, Navjeevan Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2014;11:12.   Published online June 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2014.11.12
  • 30,808 View
  • 215 Download
  • 23 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers) were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors.
Methods
Volunteer faculty (n=52), near-peers (n=57), and new entrants (n=148) admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]).
Results
Many respondent faculty (27, 96%) and mentees (65, 88%) believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33%) to 34/74 (46%). Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees); 23 mentees (82%) wanted to become near-peers themselves.
Conclusion
Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

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    Satendra Singh, Upreet Dhaliwal, Navjeevan Singh
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Medical students’ perception of the educational environment in a medical college in India: a cross-sectional study using the Dundee Ready Education Environment questionnaire  
Varun Kohli, Upreet Dhaliwal
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2013;10:5.   Published online June 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2013.10.5
  • 64,684 View
  • 429 Download
  • 22 Citations
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JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions