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Sonja E. Raaum 1 Article
Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States  
Sonja E. Raaum, Christian Arbelaez, Carlos Eduardo Vallejo, Andres M. Patino, Jorie M. Colbert-Getz, Caroline K. Milne
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:48.   Published online October 29, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.48
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps) that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two United States academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. Methods: In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100%) were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text) and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%). The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2%) was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44 (33.0%, P<0.001). The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1%) than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%, P=0.035), and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6%) in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%, P= 0.001). The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5%) than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P=0.044). Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use. Conclusion: Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • SMARTPHONE MEDICAL APPLICATION USE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG PHYSICIAN AT REFERRAL HOSPITALS IN AMHARA REGION NORTH ETHIOPIA: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY, 2019. (Preprint)
    Gizaw Hailiye, Binyam Cheklu Tilahun, Habtamu Alganeh Guadie, Ashenafi Tazebew Amare
    JMIR mHealth and uHealth.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(7): e0217988.     CrossRef
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    Jouke P. Bokma, Joshua A. Daily, Adrienne H. Kovacs, Erwin N. Oechslin, Helmut Baumgartner, Paul Khairy, Barbara J.M. Mulder, Gruschen R. Veldtman
    Cardiology in the Young.2019; 29(11): 1356.     CrossRef
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    Neurology.2018; 91(13): 597.     CrossRef
  • E-Scripts and Cell Phones
    Susie T. Harris, Paul D. Bell, Elizabeth A. Baker
    The Health Care Manager.2017; 36(4): 320.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions