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Mee Young Kim 3 Articles
Is the Pass/Fail System Applicable to a Medical School in Korea?
Mee Young Kim
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2007;4:3.   Published online December 20, 2007
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2007.4.3
  • 37,547 View
  • 139 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
To determine whether a pass/fail system is more appropriate for medical education instead of a grade-based system, a survey of medical students and faculty members of Hallym University, Korea, was taken. A questionnaire was delivered to 54 junior students and 36 faculty members from a medical school in Korea and analyzed. Of these participants, 37.7% of students and 36.1% of faculty agreed to the pass/fail system, while 28.3% of students and 52.8% of faculty objected to it. The most frequent reason for objection was the potential decrease in learning achievement. A pass/fail system should be considered after persuasion of the students and faculty to think positively of this system.
Correlations between the scores of computerized adaptive testing, paper and pencil tests, and the Korean Medical Licensing Examination
Mee Young Kim, Yoon Hwan Lee, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2005;2(1):113-118.   Published online June 30, 2005
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2005.2.1.113
  • 41,734 View
  • 154 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
To evaluate the usefulness of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) in medical school, the General Examination for senior medical students was administered as a paper and pencil test (P&P) and using CAT. The General Examination is a graduate examination, which is also a preliminary examination for the Korean Medical Licensing Examination (KMLE). The correlations between the results of the CAT and P&P and KMLE were analyzed. The correlation between the CAT and P&P was 0.8013 (p=0.000); that between the CAT and P&P was 0.7861 (p=0.000); and that between the CAT and KMLE was 0.6436 (p=0.000). Six out of 12 students with an ability estimate below 0.52 failed the KMLE. The results showed that CAT could replace P&P in medical school. The ability of CAT to predict whether students would pass the KMLE was 0.5 when the criterion of the theta value was set at -0.52 that was chosen arbitrarily for the prediction of pass or failure.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Application of Computerized Adaptive Testing in Medical Education
    Sun Huh
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2009; 21(2): 97.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of an Examinee's Ability in the Web-Based Computerized Adaptive Testing Program IRT-CAT
    Yoon-Hwan Lee, Jung-Ho Park, In-Yong Park
    Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions.2006; 3: 4.     CrossRef
Students' Attitude toward and Acceptability of Computerized Adaptive Testing in Medical School and their Effect on the Examinees' Ability
Mee Young Kim, Sun Huh
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2005;2(1):105-111.   Published online June 30, 2005
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2005.2.1.105
  • 30,880 View
  • 158 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
An examinee's ability can be evaluated precisely using computerized adaptive testing (CAT), which is shorter than written tests and more efficient in terms of the duration of the examination. We used CAT for the second General Examination of 98 senior students in medical college on November 27, 2004. We prepared 1,050 pre-calibrated test items according to item response theory, which had been used for the General Examination administered to senior students in 2003. The computer was programmed to pose questions until the standard error of the ability estimate was smaller than 0.01. To determine the students' attitude toward and evaluation of CAT, we conducted surveys before and after the examination, via the Web. The mean of the students' ability estimates was 0.3513 and its standard deviation was 0.9097 (range -2.4680 to +2.5310). There was no significant difference in the ability estimates according to the responses of students to items concerning their experience with CAT, their ability to use a computer, or their anxiety before and after the examination (p>0.05). Many students were unhappy that they could not recheck their responses (49%), and some stated that there were too few examination items (24%). Of the students, 79 % had no complaints concerning using a computer and 63% wanted to expand the use of CAT. These results indicate that CAT can be implemented in medical schools without causing difficulties for users.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Computer-Based Testing and Construction of an Item Bank Database for Medical Education in Korea
    Sun Huh
    Korean Medical Education Review.2014; 16(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Can computerized tests be introduced to the Korean Medical Licensing Examination?
    Sun Huh
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2012; 55(2): 124.     CrossRef
  • Application of Computerized Adaptive Testing in Medical Education
    Sun Huh
    Korean Journal of Medical Education.2009; 21(2): 97.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions