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Christian Chinyere Ezeala 3 Articles
Integration of computer-simulated practical exercises into undergraduate medical pharmacology education at Mulungushi University, Zambia  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2020;17:8.   Published online February 24, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2020.17.8
  • 6,445 View
  • 191 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study was conducted to determine whether a computer simulation of practical exercises in undergraduate medical pharmacology led to the realization of the intended learning outcomes.
Methods
The study was a descriptive analysis of laboratory classes carried out using computer simulation programs. Five programs were used to teach practical pharmacology to undergraduate medical students at the Mulungushi University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The study period was January 2018 to December 2019. The computer programs included a pharmacokinetics simulator (CyberPatient), organ bath simulator (OBSim), AutonomiCAL for simulating autonomic pharmacology, and Virtual Cat and Virtual Rat (RatCVS) for simulating cardiovascular pharmacology. Students utilized these programs during their pharmacology laboratory classes, wrote reports, and answered relevant clinical questions.
Results
The 5 programs provided easy and precise platforms for students to explore concepts and demonstrate knowledge of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, autonomic and cardiovascular pharmacology, and their clinical applications.
Conclusion
The programs were effective learning tools. Students’ learning was easily assessed based on their laboratory reports. Although the computer programs met medical students’ learning needs, wet laboratory exercises are also needed to meet the needs of students who require practical laboratory skills.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Simulation as a Tool to Illustrate Clinical Pharmacology Concepts to Healthcare Program Learners
    Liza Barbarello Andrews, Les Barta
    Current Pharmacology Reports.2020; 6(4): 182.     CrossRef
Analysis of the study skills of undergraduate pharmacy students of the University of Zambia School of Medicine  
Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Nalucha Siyanga
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2015;12:46.   Published online September 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2015.12.46
  • 26,992 View
  • 156 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
It aimed to compare the study skills of two groups of undergraduate pharmacy students in the School of Medicine, University of Zambia using the Study Skills Assessment Questionnaire (SSAQ), with the goal of analysing students’ study skills and identifying factors that affect study skills. A questionnaire was distributed to 67 participants from both programs using stratified random sampling. Completed questionnaires were rated according to participants study skill. The total scores and scores within subscales were analysed and compared quantitatively. Questionnaires were distributed to 37 students in the regular program, and to 30 students in the parallel program. The response rate was 100%. Students had moderate to good study skills: 22 respondents (32.8%) showed good study skills, while 45 respondents (67.2%) were found to have moderate study skills. Students in the parallel program demonstrated significantly better study skills (mean SSAQ score, 185.4±14.5), particularly in time management and writing, than the students in the regular program (mean SSAQ score 175±25.4; P<0.05). No significant differences were found according to age, gender, residential or marital status, or level of study. The students in the parallel program had better time management and writing skills, probably due to their prior work experience. The more intensive training to students in regular program is needed in improving time management and writing skills.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Examining anxiety and stress regarding virtual learning in colleges of health sciences: A cross-sectional study in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia
    Tahani Alshammari, Sarah Alseraye, Rawabi Alqasim, Aleksandra Rogowska, Nouf Alrasheed, Musaad Alshammari
    Saudi Pharmaceutical Journal.2022; 30(3): 256.     CrossRef
  • Ascertaining and promoting effective study skills and learning habits of first-year pharmacy students
    Bernadette D'Souza, Amy E. Broeseker
    Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning.2022; 14(5): 561.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting academic self-efficacy and learning experiences of pharmacy students: Insights from a qualitative study in Zambia
    Aubrey Chichonyi Kalungia, Micheal Chigunta, James Sichone, Bugewa Apampa, Sarah Marshall, Claire May, Georgina Mulundu, Chiluba Mwila, Sekelani Stanley Banda
    Pharmacy Education.2021; 21: 133.     CrossRef
Strengthening the admissions process in health care professional education: focus on a premier Pacific Island medical college
Christian Chinyere Ezeala, Mercy Okwudili Ezeala, Niraj Swami
J Educ Eval Health Prof. 2012;9:11.   Published online November 30, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3352/jeehp.2012.9.11
  • 29,358 View
  • 149 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Relying solely on measures of intellectual aptitude and academic performance in university admissions can be disadvantageous to underprivileged students. The Fiji School of Medicine primarily uses such measures to evaluate and select student applicants, and the introduction of supplementary assessments could provide better access for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This study examined the need for supplementary assessments in the admission process, types of additional assessments needed, and stakeholders??views on a multi-entry multi-exit strategy currently in use at the Fiji School of Medicine. A survey of the key stakeholders was conducted in February and March 2012 using closed and open ended questionnaire. One hundred and twenty-two validated questionnaires were self-administered by key stakeholders from the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences (CMNHS) and Fiji Ministries of Education and Health, with a response rate of 61%. Returned questionnaires were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Sixty-five percent of respondents supported the introduction of supplementary assessments, 49% favoured admissions test, and 16% preferred assessing non-academic factors. Many respondents supported the School?占퐏 multi-entry multi-exit strategy as a ?占퐂ood policy??that provided ?占퐀lexibility??and opportunity for students, but should be better regulated. These findings demonstrate the need for supplementary assessments in the selection process and for continued support for the use of multi-entry multi-exit strategy at the school.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identification of the components for investigation of the psychological strength of nursing applicants: A qualitative study
    Farzaneh Bagheriyeh, Akram Ghahramanian, Leila Valizadeh, Vahid Zamanzadeh, Geoffrey Dickens
    Nursing Open.2022; 9(6): 2618.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of admission criteria and selection methods in nursing education
    Vahid Zamanzadeh, Akram Ghahramanian, Leila Valizadeh, Farzaneh Bagheriyeh, Marita Lynagh
    BMC Nursing.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The New Era of : What Should Be Prepared to Be a Top Journal in the Category of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Sun Huh
    Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility.2013; 19(4): 419.     CrossRef

JEEHP : Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions